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April 11, 1959 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-11

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"Shall We Turn Up The News Broadcast A Little?"

u74g £ir4frnu Dally
Sixty-Ninth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
'When Opinions Are Free UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
Truth WIll Prevail" rn ,7TrPT , o r Rr"" vrAan ldr maeYTnid

SECOND SEMESTER

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JTUDrNTA.PUBlLICftAIONS BLDGI. .lAN±N ARBOR,, MYU~ICH. 'JphoneINO 1-jzt

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

RDAY, APRIL 11, 1959

NIGHT EDITOR: PETER DAWSON

Early Publication of Exam Schedule
Would Benefit Serious Students

,/
'/i /

IF STUDENT GOVERNMENT Council's rec-
ommendation is passed, the first semester
examination schedule will be listed on the last
page of the semester's time schedule.
Such a development should prove of argu-
able value to the intellectual climate of the
University. Theoretically, it will give the de-
voted student the opportunity to choose well-
spaced final exams so that he will be able to
study diligently and give a maximum perform-
ance in his courses.
Since the purpose of the final examination
is supposedly to enable the student to synthe-
size the material of the course into some sort
of a coherent whole, well-spaced tests would
allow him to do a much more efficient job of
studying and compiling a summary of the
material.
IT IS EVIDENT that anyone with four exams
on the first four days of exams won't be able
to do much of a job in any of them. Thus,
if used as intended, the pre-announced exam-
ination schedule will provide a needed oppor-
tunity for the serious student.
Admittedly, though, the plan will also serve
the student who just doesn't really give a darn
about making the most out of his educational
opportunities.
For those with the supreme goal in life of
leaving the University as soon as is humanly
possible, the early schedule will allegedly aid
them in their unacademic behavior. Some pes-
simistic observors even predict that certain
courses will become known as May 29th or
June 8 courses and popularized accordingly.
Followed to its extreme conclusion, this spec-
plation would see herds of eager-to-get-out-

early students flocking to those courses with
early exams, abandoning all rational consider-
ation of academic merits. On this basis the
enrollment in certain courses could be pre-
dicted by an analysis of the departing plane
schedule.
THE PROBLEM seems to center around stu-
dent responsibility. While early publication
of the traditional schedule may result in
throwing the academic careers of hundreds of
irresponsible undergraduates to the wolves,
witholding the schedule could result in an ac-
cusation of over-protection of the supposedly
mature University student.
The best solution to the dilemma is definite-
ly to proceed with the publication under the
assumption that University students have
enough sense to choose their courses on their
academic worth rather than on the basis of
their early finals.
THEN, TOO, the schedule would have great
practical value to students who have to
llan ahead for summer employment and would
allow truly serious students to plan their sec-
tions to enable them to have sufficient study
time.
Undeniably, there are bound to be those
students who will take advantage of the serv-
ice, but if they can manage to scrape through
the University with the least amount of effort
possible, they are the ones who lose. Withold-
ing the preliminary schedule surely won't do
much to divert them from !heir erring path
and would be of great assistance to those stu-
dents seriously interested in an education.
-JEAN HARTWIG

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIQN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 29 to June 9,1959
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at, special periods as noted below'the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the-conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
6, 8 and 9 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student'for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee.
EVENING SCHEDULE FOR DEGREE CANDIDATES
Regular Tues., June 9 Tues., June 9 Sat., June 6
Exam Time 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M.
Special Fri., May 29 Sat., May 30 Mon., June 1
Period 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M.
Regular Sat., June 6 Mon., June 8 Mon., June 8
Exam Time 2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M.
Special Tues., June 2 Wed., June 3 Thurs., June 4
Period 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time .and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

A

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:
India Maintains 'Dynamic Neutrality'

And the Ranks Falter

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, who admitted he
was the "greatest livingg architect," died
Thursday and with his passing America lost
one of its greatest thinking non-conformists.
His unquestioned brilliance in the field will
undoubtedly make him a figure that will con-
tinually influence modern architecture.
But his persistent desire to stand up for
schemes often regarded by conservatives as
crackpot or outlandish may -prove to be his
most important gift to American 'society.
In his long career, Wright expended a great
deal of effort rebelling against facets of Amer-
ican life that he disliked. "The United States'
lust for ugliness and the murderous custom of

retirement at 60" were two of the complaints
that he loudly lodged.
His continual questioning of people's atti-
tudes and willingness to stir up controversy
show an admirable effort to avoid submerging
-himself in the mediocre same thinking groups.
Wright stood among the leaders of a vanish-
ing breed of men who spoke their mind.
Far reaching innovations which will have
a permanent effect on the American archi-
tectural scene are the tangible results of his
originality. But even more important, his ef-
forts make him an example of an individual
successfully retaining his personal identity
while so many rushed to lose theirs.
-CHARLES KOZOLL

To the Editor:
IGNORANCE muffled in silence is
harmless; but ignorance blat-
antly voiced is folly and at times
even dangerous. The latter is the
case with the editorial, "Nehru's
New Outlook," by some Charles
Kozoll in the April 8, 1959 issue
of The Daily.
Faced with Red China's aggres-
sion, writes the above writer,
across her borders in Tibet, India
will realistically abandon her
policy of neutrality. Such an aban-
donment is seen in its nascent
stages, it is claimed, in granting
political asylum to Dalai Lama,
access to India of Tibetan refu-
gees and the political tirade
against the Indian Communist
party by Nehru.
This letter is just to point out
that it is only the wrong under-
standing or ignlorance of India's
foreign policy that sees any such
change or abandonment in recent
developments. India's foreign pol-
icy is and had always been one -of
dynamic neutrality as differenti-
ated from passive neutrality. Pass-
ive neutrality is tantamont to
isolationism, whereas dynamic
neutrality is equivalent to impar-
tial or unaligned arbitration.
The subtleties of a concept are
sometimes hard, and at times even
impossible, to understand unless
compared with a more physical
picture. India's dynamicneutrality
can best be compared to the role
of the referee in a boxing ring.
The referee is not aligned with or
inr the camp of either of the box-
ers, as the respective fans are

(this is alignment). .On the other
hand he is not passively sitting
there and watching the game as a
spectator not on the side of either
of the boxers (this is passive neu-
trality): But the referee plays the
role of impartial and unaligned
arbitration between the boxers
(this is dynamic neutrality).
True to her role of dynamic neu-
trality, India did always condemn
and act if and when any aggres-
sion was committed by the Com-
munists or the West, always pre-
serving her non-alignment policy.
Thus here recent actions con-
cerning Tibet are not indicative of
any change in or abandonment of
her policy of dynamic neutrality.
-Thomas S. David
Laina .
To the Editor:
T IS A misleading impression
created by Joan Kaatz in her
article, "Buddhist Living God,"
about the Tibetan Dalai Lama's
influence on the Buddhist world.
She states that the Dalai Lama's
power in the Buddhist world is
greater than the Pope's power in
the Catholic -world. She uses the
words "Buddhist World" in de-
scribing the Dalai Lama's power.
The fact is that the "Buddhist
World" consists of 150.3 million
people and only 12 million Tibetan
Buddhists, less than 10 per cent
of the total Buddhists, consider
the Dalai Lama as a Living God.
Thus it is our intention to point
out that it will not be justified to
use the,'words "Buddhist World"

in conveying the idea of the Dalai
Lama's power. This is like saying
the Pope is considered infallible
by the whole Christian World
when only fifty per cent of the
Christians are Catholic.
-Kyaw Myint, Grad.
-Kyaw Thein, Grad.
Integration ..
To the Editor:
WOULD like to. comment upon
the editorial of Mr. Langer ap-
pearing in Thursday's edition of
The Daily. Consider the two states,
Virginia and Arkansas. It appears
to me that the methods of the two
states to resist integration are
entirely dissimilar in one vital
regard. Virginia has attempted
every "legal, honorable, and peace-
ful means" 'combat integration.
Governor Almond, wit4 all means
thwarted, conceded that Virginia,
would have to, in effect, live with
integration. This is not willingness
to accept integration, but it is not
iob rule. How might we have
order and acceptance in the face
of mob rulecThe state of integra-
tion was not helped by the actions
of Arkansas, but the actions of
Virginia will, in the long run, be
for the good.
Mr. Langer notes that Virginia
is summoning every "legal, honor-
able, and peaceful means," yet he
takes issue with their resistance.
Would it not be better to give
Virginia help toward integration,
rather than a kick to keep them
moving?
-Marvin Resnikoff

Time of Class *
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
MONDAY (at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
TUESDAY (at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3
* Classes beginning on the
preceding hour.

Time of Examination
Saturday, May 30
Monday, June 1
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, May 29
Thursday, June 4
Thursday, June 4
Friday, June 5
Wednesday, June 3
Tuesday, June 2
Monday, June 1
Saturday, May 30
Wednesday, June 3
Friday, June 5
Friday, June 5
Friday, May 29
Thursday, June 4

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

half hour will be scheduled at the

SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

(

Accounting 100, 101, 200, 201
Bus. Ad. 181
Finance 110, 210
Finance 112, 215
Marketing 216
Statistics 100, 200
Statistics 201

Thursday, June 4
Friday, May 29
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, May 29
Monday, June 1
Saturday, May 30
Wednesday, June 3

2-5
7-10 p.m.
7j0 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-h p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.

April Showers May Bring May Fevers

HE COMING,:of spring in Ann Arbor un-
buckles the rain belt and releases a bar-
rage of fevers, sniffles and other minor mal-
adjustments.1
But for the 41 University students who were
found to have ulcers over an 18-month period,
as well as allother-type sufferers, there's con-
solation in the fact that authorities at home
and abroad are dedicating their time and ef-
forts to these problems.
In London, Dr. L. G. Norman, chief medical
officer for the Lohdon subway system, recent-
ly revealed his prescription for staying healthy:
Keep your mouth shut.
HE TOLD the Royal Health Society, "During
rush hours people stand with their noses
and throats as close together as 12 to 18 inches.
Yet Londoners are not unduly susceptible to
infectious diseases.
"The British people traditionally do not
converse in trains," he continued. "There may
be advantages in this national custom, as the
closed mouth minimizes the spread of infec-
tion."

Therefore, on a large campus where anoth-
er rush hour begins every 60 minutes of the
day, the same principle may be applicable. To
minimize spring fevers, University professors,
personnel and students should avoid all types
of face-to-face communication.
The simplest solution would involve cancel-
ing all classes, building walls down the middle
of rooms to separate roommate's germs from
roommate's and no dating.
ALSO, a University professor recently con-
firmed the fact that spring fever really ex-
ists. It is the result of the body's increasing its
amount of blood because of warmer outside
air, he explained.
However, the professor added that although
the cause is known, there is no cure.
Sadists know better. To further insure the
health of University faculty, personnel and
students isolated by the previous suggestion,
bring in a colony of leeches.
-NORMA SUE WOLFE

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Aero 134
Chem. Met. 1 (Lec. A and B
only)
Chem. Met. 113
Chem. Met. 212
Chem. Met. 215
C.E. 22
C.E. 52#
C.E. 53
Drawing 1, 22
Drawing 2 (A)
Drawing 2 (B)
E.E. 5
E.M. 2
M.E. 2

Friday, May 29
Saturday, June 6
Tuesday, June 9
Monday, June 8
Monday, June 8
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 6
Saturday, June 6
Tuesday, June 2
Monday, June 8
Monday, June 8
Saturday, June 6
Tuesday, June 9

2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12

SWING TOWARD GOP:
Everybody mWins in Statewide Vote

t -

I

INTERPRETING THE NEWS:
Arabs May Form New Bloc

By TOM MASTERSON
Associated Press Foreign Correspondent
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Shocked by the threat
of a Communist takeover in Iraq, Arabs
may be moved to form their own homemade
anti-Communist bloc. It could succeed where
a Western attempt to stem Communism in the
Arab East failed.
The Baghdad Pact, formed in 1955, linked
an Arab country - Iraq - to Britain, Turkey
and Pakistan in a northern wall against Com-
munism. But Arab nationalists rejected it.
They associated the West with imperialism and
colonialism, suspected its motives. Only the
Iraqi monarchy, dominated by the late Premier
Nuri Said, went along with the alliance, giving
the pact its name.
Arab union remains largely a myth. But ,a
common threat could, at least, bring the rulers
of the Arab nations together in a common
front to stage off further Soviet penetration.
rTrHE LACK of Arab unity was clear at the

place in the Middle East now and what hap-
pened in Europe a decade ago. As one Eastern
European country after another fell into the
Communist net, Western European nations ral-
lied to the concept of NATO. And even then,
the defense alliance lacked teeth until the
shock of the Korean war.
Arabs now seem to be approaching a similar
crisis. The leaders of Jordan, Lebanon, the
Sudan, Saudi Arabia, Libya, Tunisia and Mor-
occo fear Communism and are ready to admit
that a Communist takeovei' in Iraq would
threaten their positign.
PRESIDENT NASSER of the United Arab
Republic obviously also fears the effect a
Red penetration might have upon his Egyptian
and Syrian regions. Yet the other countries
have seemed to balk at Nasser's all-out anti-
Communist crusade.
One trouble with this crusade is the ap-
pearance Nasser gives of being primarily in-
terested in getting rid of a rival, Premier Abdel

By RALPH LANGER
Daily Staff Writer
IT'S A NICE ELECTION when
nobody loses. Apparently no-
body lost in this week's state elec-
tion, for both sides have claimed
victory.
The state GOP rejoiced in grab-
bing three state education offices
and interpreted their wins as a
blow to Gov. G. Mennen Williams,
as a protest against the "admin-
istration-caused financial woes,"
and as a victory for improved
party organization work outstate.
The Democrats, on the other
hand (represented by Neil Staeb-
ler, Democratic state chairman),
see the election as an endorse-
ment of the Governor's adminis-
tration. Apparently it's all in how
you look at it.
Realistically it is difficult to see
much in the way of a protest vote.
In the 12 state education contests
the Republicans captured only
three. Nine winners for the Demo-
crats hardly seems like much of
a protest, although it should be
pointed out of course that Detroit-
area school problems brout' ht a
large turnout of voters in this
traditionally Democratic area.
.In addition the state Supreme
Court retained its Democratic
majority.
This was, however, the first
time in two elections that Demo-
crats haven't gobbled un all of

state legislature to its November
55-55 deadlock. Illness forced the
absence of one legislator in the
opening session enabling the Re-
publicans to grab control, and the
Democrats have shown little evi-
dence of attempting to wrest it
away from them thus far.
The Democrats won 2-1 control
of the State Board of Education
by nabbing a formerly Republi-
can-held seat thus gaining con-
trol of the board for 'the first time
in board history.
All in all the Democrats ended
up with five-to-three control of
the University's Regents, termin-
ating a four-four split, increased
their hold on the Michigan State

University board, 5-1, instead of
the previous 4-2, and garnered
most of the seats on the brand*
new Wayne State University
Board of Governors, in addition to
the State Board of Education.
If the Republican gains do in-
dicate the beginning of the en4
of the trend that saw Democratic
power begin in 1948, gain in 1954
and appear absolute last year,
then :perhaps Republican state
chairman Lawrence Lindemer's
view that "It looks good for 1960"
is justified.
At any rate it is nice to have re-
turned to a "two-party system"
and especially one where "nobody
loses."

Botany 1
Botany 2, 122
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 14
Economics 71, 72, 173
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 91, 153
English 23 (A), 24 (A)
English 23 (B), 24 (B)
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32,
61
German 1, 2,'11, 31, 32, 35.,36
Latin 22
Physics 54
Russian 1, 2, 12, 32
Sociology 1
Sociology 60
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31

Wednesday, June 3
Friday, June 5
Wednesday, June 3
Thursday, June 4
Friday, May 29
Saturday, May 30
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6
Monday, June 8
Saturday, June 6
Wednesday, June 3
Monday, June 8
Tuesday, June 9
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6

7-10 p.m.
2-5
9-12
.2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Election Results

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for-adjustment.
See instructions posted outside Room, 441 W.E. between April 20
and May i
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board of the School of Music.

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