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February 12, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TH RSDA-ir, FEBRUARY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. FEBRUARY

Ann Arbor Civie Theatre

presents

WILLAMS Pulitzer Prize PLAY

V

DIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Feb. 12, 13, 14 .. at 8 P.M.
"It faces and speaks the raw truth" NY Times
Adults-only recommended
Premiere of original third act
"SEE YOU AT THE LEAGUE"

rigin' Idea
Shocks Mild
Englishmen
(Contiiued from Page 1)
partment reflected yesterday. "He
put man in'his place," the noted
biologist continued.
"Darwin changed thought so
much that now we study how one
thing evolves to another," Prof.
Bates said. This is completely dif-
ferent from 100 years ago when
we studied things from the point
of view, "well, here it is, now let's
study it," he commented.
The controversial, "Origin of
Species" a was banned in some
schools during its early years and
met with a skeptical interlude
from about 1895 to 1920. But the
majority of scientific students
eventually accepted the Darwinist
theories.
Reasonable Reaction
Prof.'Jones of the botany de-
partment called his students' re-
action to the theories of Darwin
"quite reasonable" once they
"study evolution first hand. Their
attitude is much the same today
as it was 39 years ago when I
joined the department," the well-
known botanist said.
Prof. Jones blamed most of the
reaction on misinformation due
to the students' lack of first-hand
reading on the sukject.
Prof. Bates also expressed "sur-
prise at the lack of knowledge
among beginning students on evo-
lution. Students educated in pa-
rochial schools usually know more
about evolution than {those taught
in public schools," hexsaid.
Initially Shocked'
Some of the students are
shocked at first but they get used
to it, Prof. Bates said.
Commenting on pre-Darwin
thought on evolution, Prof. Bates
said the theory can be traced back
to Le Mark who wrote around 1810
and even back to the Greeks.

SOCIETA CORELLI-A pearing in conjunction with the University's Chamber Music Festival,
this' Italian musical group, composed of 13 string instrument players, will make its second appear-
ance in Ann Arbor tomorrow at 8:30 p.m. in Rackham Auditorium. The group will also present
two other concerts, one Saturday night and one Sunday afternoon.
Societa Corelli, Stanley Quartet To Give
Camber Music, Concerts at Rackharn

. .

Morrison Launches Rocke
At Cape Canaveral Test Si

,,,

'
e

The University will feature two
programs of, chamber music be-
ginning tomorrow and extending
through Tuesday, Feb. 17.
The Chamber Music Festival
will .offer the Societa Corelli, a
group with 13 string players, in
three concerts. The first two will
be given at 8:30 p.m. Friday and
Saturday and the third at 2:30
p.m. Sunday in Rackham Audi-
torium.
The Stanley Quartet will also
present a program of chamber
music at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Second Appearance
Tomorrow evening, the Societa
Corelli, which is making its sec-
ond appearance in Ann Arbor, will
play "Concerto Grosso, Op. 6, No.
8 in G major, Pour la Nuit de

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Noel" by Corelli; "Concerto gros-
so, Op. 3, No. 11, in D minor" by
Vivaldi; "Concerto in B-flat ma-
jor, for Cello and Strings" by Boc-
cherini, and "Concerto in D" by
Stravinsky.
The program for Saturday even-
ing will include "Sinfonia No. 2"
by Vivaldi; "Andante" by Gemin-
iani; "Pastorale e Molto Allegro"
by 4carlatti, and "Aria for Cello
and Strings" by Porpora.-
During the second concert the
group will also play "Iitroduzione,
Aria e Presto" by Marcello; "Sin-
fonia No. 1" by Vivaldi; "Canzone
'U' Scientists
Cite Programs
(Continued from Page 1)
In the second semester of the
junior year each student chooses
a topic together with some mem-
ber of the faculty with whom he
would like to work.
The senior year in zoology is
devoted to doing' a research prpb-
lem. Each student talks with fac-,
ulty men in different branches of
zoology, what they do in research
and how they are proceeding.
They. may talk with physiologists,
geneticists, etc.
Meet Faculty
"By the end of the first semes-
ter the honors students meet most
of the faculty," Prof. Smith said.
In addition they are given re-
prints of articles published by
these men. In this way a student
knows with whom he would like
to work and what branch inter-
ests him most.
At the end of the senior year
each student writes a report on his
topic.
'A student is required to have
at least 20 hours of science," Prof.
Smith said. Most students enter
the program in their junior year
but it is also possible to enter in
the senior year.'
"The first semester of the senior
year in geology students may take
a one hour graduate seminar."
Prof. Dorr said. They also delve
into laboratory and problem work
with selected staff members in a
branch which holds special in-
terest for them.
Work on Research
In this course they gather data,
analyze it and study laboratory
or field techniques. A student may
also work on some aspect of a
staff member's current research
problem," Prof. Dorr said.
In the second semester the stu-
dent may also attend a graduate
seminar for one hour credit. In
addition they do independent or
team research on a small prob-
lem under the guidance of a staff
member in that field of interest.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

e Minuetto" by Donizetti; "Cele-
bre Minuetto" by Boccherini; and
"Concerto grosso Op; 6, No. 1" by
Corelli.,
Final Performance
The Societa Corelli's third and
final performance on Sunday aft-
ernoon will include "Concerto
grosso, Op. 6, No. 5 in C minor"
by Corelli; "Concerto grosso" by
Handel; "Concerto in D major for
Cello and Strings" by Boccherini;
and "Simple Symphony" by Brit-
ten.
Feb. 17, 1953 marked the 300th
aniversary of the birth of Arcan-
gelo Corelli, one of the great men
of the early classical period in
Italy. To commemorate this occa-
sion, the Italian government made
it possible for the modern inheri-
tors of his name to travel to this
side of the Atlantic.
The Stanley Quartet is com-
posed of four music school pro-
fessors, Gilbert Ross, violin; Gus-
tave Rosseels, violin; Robert
Courte, viola; and Oliver Edel,
violincello.
To Hear Quartet Tuesday
Their chamber music concert
on Tuesday evening will include
Mozart's "Quartet in C major" and
Halffter's "Quartet," written in
1958 under commission of the
University and dedicated to the
Stanley Quartet.
After intermission, the group
will play "Andante con moto"
from "Quartet in D minor" by
Schubert, which is being played in
memory of Helen Titus, deceased
professor of music at the Univer-
sity, and "Quartet in A minor, Op.
41, No. 1" b.y Schumann.
U' To Hear
Music Work
Stravinsky's "L'Histoire du Sol-
dat" will receive its first Ann Ar-
bor performance at 8:30 p.m. Mon-
day in Aud. A of Angell Hall,
Roberta Wolff, '60, public relations
manager of the University Or-
chestra said.
The work, unusual in that it is
played with only seven instru-
ments, will be performed by Uni-
versity students in conjunction
with the degree recital of one of
the students.
The conductor of the group will
be Robert Hause ,a graduate stu-
dent in the music school. He will
lead the ensemble in which Rich-
ard Wilson, Grad., clarinet; Wil-
liam Scribner, '61SM, bassoon;
Gary Stollsteimer, '59SM., trum-
pet; and John Christie, Grad.,
SM., trombone. will play. Also
participating in the group will be
Lawrence Hurst, '59 SM., double
bass; Harold Jones, '60 SM, per-
cussion; and Elnore Crampton,
Grad., SM., violin,
Stravinsky's composition is
unique in its mastery of rhythm
and instrumental sound and in-
cludes, among its many interesting
devices, a stylized rag-time move-
ment.

By BARTON HUTHWAITE
Aeronautical engineering Prof.
Richard B. Morrison wears cowboy
boots, string ties and smokes
cigars,
He also fires rockets.
The 38-year-old Morrison served
as field test director for the Air
Force's first lunar probe on Aug. 7.
He also headed the Thor-Able test;
series as project director and was;
technical test director for the At-,
las intercontinental ballistic mis-
sile firing at the Cape Canaveral
test site in Florida.
Praises Cooperation
1 Recently returned from the
United States' rocket test center,
Morrison praised the "close co-
operation" between military men
and scientists throughout the
various tests.
"I can't point to a single in-
stance on the Thor-Able series
where security held us up," he said
recently.
The Thor, a surface-to-surface
rocket designed as an intermediate
range ballistic missile, has a max-
imum range of 1,500 miles and is
expected to form a vital link in
the United States' strategic air
defense.
' Parts Available
Commenting on the availabili-
ty of needed rocket parts, Prof.
Moirison said, "We are not as bad
cif as some people believe. I don't
know of any time when parts held
us up," he said.
The rocket expert shrugged off
the possibility of governmental in-
terference in the scheduling of
rocket tests for political reasons.
"No government would be foolish
enough to dictate the shot time,"
Prof. Morrison said.
"The decisions made are purely
scientific and objective," he said.
The best way is not to even look
at schedules, he added.
Expresses Impatience
Prof. Morrison was impatient
with some demands for a more
"successful" United States rocket
program. "If every test was go-
ing to be successful and you knew
it, there would be no sense in run-
ning it," he said.
"Success means a lot more than
just getting the rocket to burn for
a set time," Prof. Morrison added.
Any test from which you can
learn corrective data that you
couldn't have learned in any oth-
er way is a success, he commented.
The current space race between
Russia and the United States

brought irate comment from the
rocket expert.
"The missile race just doesn't
worry me," Prof. Morrison said.
The only race we should be en-
gaged in is trying to increase our
technical and scientific level on a
broad base, he said.
"Sometimes this objective is ob-
scured in passion," Prof. Morri-
son quickly added. "For us to tie
our world situation to a single
missile shot is not very intelli-
gent," he said.
The youthful scientist described
his 16-month stay at Cape Ca-
naveral as "most fascinating and
enjoyable. My experience at the
test site pointed out the necessity
of basic research," he said. Cape
Canaveral is a culmination of your
work, Prof. Morrison added.
Praises Cape
It was a great opportunity to
get out and see the finished hard-
ware, he commented, but here at
the University you have the
chance to understand the basic
science.
The scientist should make a cir-
cuit from the finished product
back to the basic research that
produces that finished project, he
added.
Orgamzation
Notices
(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to offi-
cialy recognized and registered or-
ganizations only. , Organizations
planning to be active for the cur-
rent semester must register. Forms
available, 2011 Student Activities
Building.)
Christian Science Org., regular testi-
nony meeting, Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m.
League: check main lobby bulletin
board for room number.
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
social action luncheon, Feb. 12, 12 noon,
Guild House.
* * *
Grad. History Club, Feb. 12, 8 p.m.
Rackham Bldg., W. Con. Em. Speaker:
Dr. D. H. Pinkney, "The American His-
torian of France - Frustration and
Opportunity."
* * .
I.S.A., Valentine Dance (all campus),
Feb. 14, 8-12 p.m., Union Ballroom.
* * *
National and International' Affairs
of SGC, sub-chairmen meetings, Feb.
12, 3:30-5 p.m., SAB.
. . *
w.A.A. Bowling Club, organizational
meeting, Feb. 12, 5:10 p.m., Women's
Athletic Bldg. All interested women
students welcome.

U

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W.aLW2s 1

III

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