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April 09, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

BETA THETA PI:
Fraternity Plans To Demolish House

"We, the modern world, are the
sleepers, unconscious of the im-
aginative order of other ages,"
Kathleen Raine, British poet and
critic, said in a reading yesterday.
"We were traditionalists in a
non-traditional society," Miss
Raine said of herself and her
group of fellow poets, who wrote
of "the old, pre-mechanized world
which God created."
These writers, she continued,
such as Herbert Read, Edwin
Muir, and herself, wrote of the
imaginative world. A poem, Miss
Raine added, is not constructed,
but created while the mind con-
centrates on something else, some-
thing beyond, which is terribly
difficult to define.
Miss Raine, who arrived here
Tuesday for a series of lectures
and readings, will live in Markley
Hall throughout this week and for
part of next.

DAYS NUMBERED-Beta Theta Pi, the University's second oldest
fraternity house, is scheduled to be demolished in June to make
way for a modern, tri-level structure. The new building is planned
for occupancy in the fall of 1960.
DYSPHASIA RECOVERY :
'U Clinic Aids Patients
In Improving Speech

DIAL
NO 2-3136

By CHARLES KOZOLL

~1

I

Through an informal "coffee-
hour" atmosphere 11 patients in
the dysphasia division of the uni-
versity speech clinic are "learning
to talk" once again.-
Suffering from dysphasia or loss
of ability to communicate because
of brain damage, the patients par-
ticipate in a twelve week re-ha-
bilitation period designed to im-
prove their speech and aid them
in re-adjusting to society.
The* recovery program entails
both individual and group work in
the speech area for five hours a
day. Under the guidance of Mary
Anna Bender, the division's direc-
tor, the patients, who come from
as far as Tacoma, Wash., work on
reading, spelling, writing, number
concepts and according to the,
ability and interest of the group,
bookkeeping and typing.
Solve Problems
A large part of the time is spent
in working on individual troubles
which range from problems of ar-
ticulation to finding the right
words and lack of fluency. Group
situations are primarily employed
in' re-habilitation, Miss Bender
noted.
Bridge is used because it stim-
ulates speech while improving
visual perception and arithmetic
ability. Bowling is valuable as a

social situation which allows an
individual with physical difficul-
ties to enjoy a sport which might
otherwise be impossible.
Besides sports, the group regu-
larly holds a morning coffee hour
which is used as a basis for group
work. Patients organize business
meetings or hold discussions to
increase speech activity.
Offers Therapy
In addition to the speech ther-
apy, the division makes available
physical therapy for those who
,have lost all or partial use of
their hands and army through
paralytic strokes. A psychological
social wdrker is also on hand to
help patients with personal prob-
lems and advise relatives at home
on ways to aid re-adjustment.
To participate in the program
an individual must be able to walk
and care for himself.
"The clinic accepts people for
the program if they feel that in-
dividuals can be returned to some
type of gainful employment," Miss
Bender explained. "This has often
forced individuals to shift from
former jobs to ones involving
skills that they can master," she
added.
People accepted to the program
pay a $330 tuition fee for the 12
week semester in addition to room
and board in a house provided by
the University. The patients must
also be able to walk and care for
themselves, Miss Bender pointed
out, in order to treat them as
self-sufficientadults.
Orgamzation
NNotices
Christian Science Org., regular tes-
timony meeting, April 9, 7:30 p.m.,
League: See bulletin board in main
lobby for rm. no.
Deutscher Verein, meeting, April 9,
7:30 p.m., Union, Rm. 3R. Speaker:
Prof. P. Slosson, "The Fall of Munich."
Refreshments.
Italian Club, coffee hour, April 9,
3-5 p.m., 3050 FB. All welcome,
* * *
J-Hop. Petitioning, petitions for 1961
J-Hop CentralComm a v ailable
through April 13, 3-5 p.m. daily, 2534
SAB.
Kappa Phi Club, meeting, April 9,
7:15 p.m., Wesley Lounge.
WAA Golf Club, to play on U. of M.
Golf Course, April 9, 3 p.m. and later.
Prizes to be awarded on all levels of
competition. In case of rain, meet in
WAB golf cages.
* 0*w*
Folklore Society, general meeting,
important that all members attend,
April 9, 7:30 p.m., Union, Rm. 3D.
U. of M. "M" Club, Spring Semi-
Formal Dance, April 11, 9-12 p.m., Golf
Clubhouse.

ED A CAR
IN A
k HURRY?

P.M.

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Have the freedom of your
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cars. Low rates include gas,
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reservation service.
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NO 3-4156
-A

Shop

U' Estabhlishes
Library Group
A Library Selections Committee
for Men's Residence Halls was es-
tablished recently, according to
the Vice-President of Student Af-
fairs James A. Lewis.
The committee is composed of
two student members from each
quadrangle, one of whom is ac-
tively working in the respective
quadrangle library.

E

Through
Saturday

DIAL
NO 12-2513

I

Tonight at 7:00 and 9:00
STANLEY KRAMER'S
"yrano deBergerac"
with JOSE FERRER,
MALA POWERS, WILLIAM PRINCE
ACADEMY AWARD
Ca rtoon
Saturday 7:00 and 9:20
Sunday at 8:00
NORDHOFF AND HALL'S
"utiny.onARthe Bounty
with CLARK GABLE,
t^ t A rni ~I r A i ni t.. -r- . 1"MA kt1,e- I /^1T - rtr

I

I

HELD OVERI
Giant outdoor motion picture entertainment in
magnificent c'lor-shown on our huge screen!
They're together and nothing can tear'em apart!
JON WAYNEDEMAN MARTIN
RISKYNElSON HWRS! j3N4yR 5
TECHNICOLOR from WARNER BROS.

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