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April 07, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN nAtY:v

I' Nine Returns
ith 1-6 Record

... as a: ixaA%.A, v- Mill uMi ;TUESDAY, APRI L7
IN ADVERSE WEATHER
Lnksmen Wi Two Meets, Lose One

' t

By CLIFF MARKS

By TOM WITECKI
A group of Michigan students
that did something besidgs "swim
and sun" during their vacation
trip to Florida was the Wolverine
baseball team, which spent a good
share of its time on the diamonds
of Tallahassee.
There they participated in the.
fourth annual Florida State Invi-
tational Tourney along with seven
other collegiate teams, including
Michigan State, Western MicAii-
gan, and Illinois, posting a disap-
pointing 1-6 record.
Home Opener Thursday
Commenting on the team's play,
in Florida, head coach Don Lund
said, "We made a 'lot of mental
mistakes in losing the six games,
but I think we got them out of our
system; at least I hope so with the
Big Ten season just a. few weeks
away, and the home opener this
Thursday against the University
of Detroit."
Vacation Scores
Western Michigan 7, Michigan 6
Michigan 6, Duke 2
Florida 6, Michigan h
Duke 2, Michigan .0
Florida State 12, Michigan 0
Western Michigan 9, Michigan I
Michigan State 1, Michigan 0
Lakers Host
MINNEAPOLIS (P) - Long Bill
tussell of the Boston Celtics isl
averaging only seven points a
dame but he's killing the Minne-
ipolis Lakers off the boards in
>ro basketball's world series.
With 58 rebounds in two games
he Celts' tefensivevwonderman
ast a tall shadow over dimming
.aker hopes in the National Bas-t
cetball Assn. playoffs resuming1
onight in St. Paul.'
But Boston coach -Red Auer-:
ach declined to do any prema-1
ure chortling. "This Laker team
s a good one and they've got az
,ood attitude," he said. "They'llt
e tough here in the Twin Cities."
Still hanging over the Lakers ist
he knowledge that they have notI
eaten Boston in 20 consecutive
ames.
The series moves to the Minne-
polis Armory Thursday night.
additional games, if necessary,
vill be in Boston Saturday, Min-
eapolis Sunday night and Bos-
on next Tuesday night.

Although he was not at all
happy about the results of the va-
cation competition, Lund said,
"the team still has definite possi-
bilities of developing into a pretty
good ball club."
The Reasons Why
Two factors may have contribu-
ted to Michigan's poor showing in
the tourney: the Wolverines were
playing their, first games of the
season while all the other squads
had seen previous action (Florida
State had 14 games under its belt
before the tourney started); and
Lund experimented freely with his
lineup, permitting all the players
who made the trip to play, exclud-
ing Wilbur Franklin, who was un-
able to compete because of local
racial laws. He worked out with
the Florida A&M team.
In yesterday's practice at Ferry
Field, Lund continued his experi-
mentation in an effort to get "the
best-nine men in the lineup." The
latest move was the switch of Dave
Brown, last year's 'regular third
baseman, to centerfield, with soph-
omore Franklin moving in at the
hot corner.

TO THE VICTORS - Michigan swim coaches Gus Stager (second from right) and Bruce Harlan
.(left), flanking Captain Cy Hopkins, all appear in a jovial mood upon presentation of the NCAA
team championship trophy to them by Cornell athletic director Robert J. Kane (right). Wolverine
swimmers scored a record 137%2 points in the three-day exercises March 26-28 at Ithaca, N. Y.
x 4
Gillanders, Hanley Pace Swimmers
To Record-Smashing NCA A Victorv
,J

Michigan's golfers performed
creditably on their spring trip as
tley won two of three meets
played in weather which was un-
usual for the state of North Caro-
lina.
Cold, high winds, and rain
marred the excursion as the links-
men took the measure of Cornell
and Hope Valley C.C., and lost to
North Carolina.
The Cornell match was the first
one for the 'M' squad and the
score was 7-3. Captain Ray Lov-
ell was the medalist with a'73 in
the meet played at Hope Valley,
Just outside of Durham, Thurs-
day.
North Carolina was the. oppo-
nent the following day and the
Tar Heels whipped Michigan
18-12 at the winners' course in
Chapel Hill. Sophomore Joe Bris-
son was low man for the Wolver-
ines with an even par 72.
Larry Markman led the divot-
men to a 23-13 win over Hope
Valley C. C. in the club's last meet
on Saturday'by firing an even par,
70 over the tight Hope Valley
course. This match wound up the
Wolverines' spring trip action.
Coaches Join In1
Coach Bert Katzenmeyer ex-,
plained the difference' in scoring
by saying, "We played seven men
in the meets with the exception
of the one against Hope Valley'
when the coaches played.
"Against Cornell the scoring1
was three points per foursome and9
one for the odd man. The scoring
for the other two meets was nine
points per foursome and three for
the odd man."
All the spring vacation meets
were decided on match play,

whereas the upcoming meets will the Cornell meet, and in the same
be decided on medal play (only manner three points were given

the score counts). The points were
distributed one per match and
one for the two-man best-ball in
Course Opens
The University golf course
opened yesterday. Manager Jack
Blott announced that reserva-
tions can be made as much as a
week in advance and that they
will be taken for both morning
and afternoon of any day. Blott1
added that on busy days and 1
weekends only foursomes would
be sent out.a

for each match in the others.
Katzenmeyer had some more
words to say about the team's
showing. "No one really surprised
me," he said. "I am fairly well
satisfied with some, disappointed
in others."
He also added that although
there were some rounds in the 80s,
the team average was well under
that figure.
Despite the bad weather, the
team got in some good practice on
the Pinehurst No. 2 championship
course before playing the three
meets. The next one is at the
University of Detroit on April 18.

Patterson-London Bout
Switched to. Indianapolis

11

Further Shifts
Another of Lund's renovations,
which are gradually giving the
Michigan team "a new look," is
the shift of last year's starting
catcher Jim Dickey to lefttield
with another sophomore, Dick
Syring, taking over at the back-
stop position.
The other major change finds
still another sophomore, Barry
Marshall, replacing letterman Bob
Kucher at second base.
Lund insists that most of these
changes are still tentative and
that noneof the starting positions
are taken. The reason for most of
the changes is to put more power
into a Wolverine lineup that at
times was pitifully weak at the
plate last week.,
The Wolverines opened their
Junket with a 6-2 victory over
Duke,but after that all was defeat
for the nine as they dropped the
next six contests, three of which
they lost by one run. The low
point of the trip was reached in
the final contest when the Wol-
verines blew several good scoring
opportunities, losing 1-0 to Michi-
gan State.
EXHIBITIONBASEBALL
San Francisco 8, Cleveland 6
Spokane (PCL) 3, Los Angeles 2
Detroit 7, St. Louis 2
Pittsbdrgh 2, Kansas City 1
Chicago (A) 9, Washington 6
Boston 11, Chicago (N) 3

By JIM BENAGH
Michigan's invincible swimmers
stunned their hapless opponents
by compiling a record 137 2 points
to win their third straight NCAA
championship in a vacation-time
competition at Cornell's Teagle
Hall pool.
The Wolverines' massive point
total-93/2 better than runner-up
Ohio State-erased the all-time
team total of 96/2, set by Yale in
1953.
Only Five Firsts
While the Wolverines had only
five first places in the 16 events,
the road to the winner's circle was
crowded by numerous- second-,
third-, and fourth-place Michigan
pointmakers. No one questioned'
the fact that Michigan's depth was
the greatest ever displayed in the
36-year history of the meet.
Even then, the biggest winners
were sophomore Dave Gillanders
and senior Dick Hanley, a pair of
frequently-beaten tankers during
the regular season. Each earned
three gold medals.
Gillanders dethroned teammate+

Tony Tashnick in twosuperb but-
terfly events and bettered Ameri-
can, NCAA and meet records in
doing so. The new chamip had de-
feated the defender only once dur-
ing the regular campaign.
Helps in Relay
The 19-yr.-old honor student
later climaxed a record-shattering
weekend by giving Michigan a lead
it never lost in the third leg of the
400-yd. medley relay-the meet's
final event,. Backstroker John
Smith, breaststroker Ron Clark
and freestyler Hanley joined him
in the relay win, which was com-
pleted in a meet-record time of
3:46.8.
Hanley, another triple-winner,
had dealt Michigan State's Billy
Steuart his first defeat of the year
in the 220-yd. freestyle and shared
a leg of the 400-yd. freestyle relay
in the preceding day's action.
The former Olympic star, who
said he may have been swimming
in competition for the last time,
shared the relay victory-also a
meet record-with John McGuire,
Carl Woolley and Frank Legacki.

Barrel-chested Legacki, whose
greatest moments came a week'
later in the National AAU meet,
won Michigan's other first with his
photo-finish victory in the 100-yd.
sprint.,
Legacki met his first defeat in
the 100 last Saturday in the AAU
meet when defending champ Lance
Larsen edged him out at the finish.
But the Philadelphian dethroned
Tashnick and defeated Gillanders
to triumph in the 100-yd. butter-
fly.
Depth Means Points
In the NCAA contests, Michi-
gan's point total was inflated by
second-place finishers Tashnick,
in the two butterfly races and the
200-yd. individual medley; diver
'Joe Gerlach (who was Michigan's
only other winner in the AAU con-
tests in the highboard); Smith in
the 200-yd. backstroke; John Ur-
bancsok, in the 1500-meter free
style; Ron Clark in the 100-yd.
breaststroke; and' Captain Cy
Hopkins, in the 200-yd. breast-
stroke.
Underclassmen scored 106/2 of
Michigan's total-with sophomores
alone combined to better last
year's winning total (72) by one
point.
Praised by Mann
The team was lauded by former
Michigan coach Matt Mann, a
coach of six past team champions,
as "the greatest team I ever saw."
"By far, my greatest victory,"
added the present Wolverine
coach, Gus Stager.

INDIANAPOLIS (A) - Floyd
Patterson's manager said yester-
day Patterson would defend his3
heavyweight championship
against Brian London here May 11
instead of at Las Vegas, Nev., re-
gardless of the outcome of a tele-
vision contract.
Cus D'Amato said the television
dispute was between theNational
Broadcasting Co. and Cecil
,Rhodes Jr., Cranford, N. J. in-
dustrialist-promoter, but added:
"Regardless of what happens,
the fight will be held in Indian-
apolis."
Rhodes said the title bout was
moved from Las Vegas to In-
dianapolis to escape rumors of
gamblers' backing.
r

"There wasn't -- legally or il-
legally," Rhodes added. "But I
don't want that kind of implica-
tion."
Rhodes said he,. expects NBC
and , Gillette Co., sponsors, to
agree to switch in the telecast.

W ELCOME BACK
FOR THE FINEST
HAIRCUTS IN TOWN!
715 N. University

e

Bruins; Leafs
Meet Tonight
BOSTON (M~-A trip to Mon-
treal for a shot at hockey's coveted
Stanley Cup hangs in the balance
tonight whexi the taped and tired
Boston Bruins and Toronto Maple
Leafs square off at the Garden.
What started as a best-of-seven
competition comes down to a one
hour, shoot-the-works engagement
to decide which club moves into
the finals of the National Hockey
League playoffs.
"The home ice is a slight ad-
vantage," Bruin coach Milt
Schmidt conceded, "but we can't
kid ourselves that we're going to
have an easy timE with the Leafs."
Boston snapped out of a three-
game losing streak to edge Toron-
to, 5-4, Saturday night in the
Canadian city and deadlocked the
competition, 3-3, just when it ap-
peared the Leafs were a cinch.

ANNOUNCING:
4 The Annual
"M" CLUB
SEMI-FORMA L DANCE
DICK TILKIN'S QUINTET -- INTERMISSION ENTERTAINMENT
Michigan Golf Clubhouse
SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 1959 ... 9-12 P.M.

TITLE TO OKLAHOMA STATE:
Matmen Lose in NCAA;
Michigan Coach Honored

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By DAVE LYON
Michigan's 195P-59 wrestling
season came to a close late Thurs-
day night, March 26, when both
Wolverine entries in the NCAA
tournament at Iowa City were de-.
feated in preliminary matches.
Sophomore Dennis Fitzgerald,
Michigan entrant at 167 pounds,
drew a first-round bye, but in the
second round he was edged by
Mankato (Minn.) State's Lowell
Glyn, 4-3,
The only other Michigan com-
petitor, soph Karl Fink, "wrestled
a good match," said Wolverine
Coach Cliff Keen, but Colorado
State's Ed Rath was just a bit
better, also taking a 4-3 victory.
Another Title
The three-day meet, biggest in
NCAA history, drew almost 250
entries from 70 schools. None of
them could stop Oklahoma State
from rolling to its 21st team
championship in 29 years. Keen's
alma mater scored 73 points, with
two other Big Eight schools, Iowa
State and Oklahoma, trailing with
51 and 41 points.
Host team Iowa was the strong-
est Big Ten team, finishing fourth
with 33 points.
Big Ten team titlist Minnesota,
which won that championship
mainly on balance, did not have
the outstanding individuals a team
Welcome Sludentsl
Try us today for:
" CREW CUTS
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The Dascolo Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

needs to figure highly in the scor-
ing. The Gophers scored only 17
points to tie for-ninth with Michi-
gan State.
Wins Recognition
Each year it is customary for
the NCAA to dedicate the official
program of the meet to one or
more individuals 'who have made
outstanding contributions to wren-
tling. This year's program honored
Keen and Earl Mendenhall of Iowa
State Teachers.
Keen, who has coached wrestling
at Michigan since 1925, has also
been active during the past year
as a member of a committee set
up by the NCAA to study possible
changes in collegiate wrestling
rules.
Pay-TV Tilts
Next Season
NEW YORK (A) - A spokes-
man for Skiatron of America said
yesterday that the subscription
TV firm probably would begin
dlosed circuit television of the
major league games from Los An-
geles and San Francisco April 1,
1960.
The statement was made by
Lester M. Malitz, a television pro-
ducer, at a press conference in
which it was announced that
Skiatron and the Chicago Sta-
diuni Corporation have entered a
long-term agreement to telecast
sports events via closed circuit to
theaters and homes.
Malitz said Skiatron was inter-
ested in telecasting, via closed
circuit, the National Hockey
League games at Chicago Stadium
in 1960.

11

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English: M EDCAL ..EXIC
-:"; :: s:>:: :::::ii::: .: } .. I
Vii:<i. ';iii:r: ' . ii i i :'ii ::: ":: : is : j
J' En lisAh: TH"O:;P OSATSU'IIOW
AlAM ROSE. ENN TATE
4: tCY

R ~reas4
r who
He's
advi
gal's
thou
this
the
alwa
says
SDEBT "
English: E
. =.: - >;AT : :Q >.;. ':. ': ": .G
1lAR E R D~kE. EA.... : ....:::::$r~f r;';:cjy er: '"::f. 3

nklish translation. The appropriate
-d for this gent is Crassangva! Main
ons: 1. He's the only guy we know
sends mimeographed love letters. 2.
s the only guy who doesn't make
ances when he runs out of gas (the
' too busy pushing his car). Too
ughtless to buy his own cigarettes,
bird only dates girls who appreciate
honest taste of fine tobacco. "We
ays have something in common," he
. "Her Luckies!"
English: RUN-DOWN CHICKEN COOP
E COtI OLY U.OF SA TA

I ce I

Engllsh:,BOORISH LOVER BOY

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11

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