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March 26, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DLLY

MAIL ORDERS NOW
en Jonson 's Comic Satire
VOLPO NE
Presented 6y U. of M. Dept. of Speech
rdia Mendelssohn Theatre

ANTARCTIC DISCOVERY:
Geologist Discusses Russian Claim
By BARTON HUTHWAITE | .7>'.

Candidates Tell Platfor

L.

APRIL,

9,

10, 11-8 P.M.

A noted University geologist
shed some light yesterday on the
Russian announcement that they
have discovered a continental land
mass beneath the great ice sheet
of the Antarctica.
Prof. James H. Zumberge of the
geology department called the
Russian claims "not very world-
shaking" and added a graduate
student here had concluded the
same thing back in 1952.
Two scientists of the United
States Weather Bureau, Dr. Harry
Wexler and Morton J. Rubin, had
reported the Russian discovery at
a news conference this week. They
said "positive" evidence of a con-
tinent had been found by the
Russians during a long, over-ice
trek made in the latter part of
1958 from their main base at
Mirny on the Knox Coast.
'Didn't Cause Stir'
Prof. Zumberge continued that
the Russian announcement didn't.
cause "any great stir" in United
States scientific circles. He added
that the discovery does not have
any practical or strategic value at
the present time.,
James Moore, Grad., had con-

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FILL OUT and send to: play produ
Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann Arbor, en
dressed envelope, make check payable t
ENCLOSED FIND $ for
TICKETS TO "VOLPONE" ON (CIRCLEi
THURS, APR. 9; FRI., APR. 10; S
$1.50 $1.10 75c
Name j
Address

ction, box office Lydia
close stoamped, self-ad-
to "Play Production".
ONE)
AT., APR. 11.
I
1
1
1
I

ANTARCTIC DISCOVERY-Russian scientists claim discovery of
land under the Antarctic icecap. The Russians, stationed in the
eastern section of the polar region, may have proven the existence
of a continent-something that has been suspected by scientists

Jwuptofn /k1e4 TRAVELOGUE,
GIBRALTAR BASQUE COUNTRY
to the and the
PYRENEES CANARY ISLANDS
motion pictures in natural color
narrated by ROBERT MALLETT
TONIGHT at 8:30
Tickets: 90c, 50c On sale at box office 10 A.M.-8:30 P.M.
UNIVERSITY PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS* HILL AUDITORIUM

for several years.
cluded there was a land mass there
from observations of earthquake
waves that had passed through
the Polar region seven years ago,
Prof. Zumberge said. He added the
Russians are by no means the first
to present evidence in this area.
"The Russians have a tendency
to take propaganda .advantage of
anything they have to report,"
Prof. Zumberge commented. The.
United States has been doing work
in this field but we have not made
such a firm commitment because
we have more data to analyze, he
said.
Make Soundings
Using dynamite charges, the
Russians made seismic soundings
about every 30 to 50 miles along
a route in 'their sector. The ex-
plosions were employed to send
sound-waves down through the
covering ice and pick up echoes
from the underlying land.
Prof. Zumberge said the ice
reacies a thickness ofalmost two
miles in this area.

Although the Russians may have
evidence there is a land mass
there, Prof. Zumberge said, this
does not prove it is a continent
as we know it.
May be Under Sea
,But Prof. Zumberge said this
land mass may be beneath sea-
level. The tremendous pressure of
the ice may have forced the land
to sink. "It would,in that case, not
be a continent as we know it," he
said.
Prof. Zumberge said the theory
there was a land mass under the
Antarctica is "something more or
less agreed upon."
Organization
Notices
Christian Science Organization, regu-
lar testimony meeting ,March 26, 7:30
p.m., Mich. League. See bulletin board
in main lobby for room number.
Inst. of Aeronautical Sciences: Am.
Rocket Soc., combined meeting, March
26, 7:30 p.m., 1042 E. Engin. Speaker:
Mr. Robert E. Bower.,
* * *
Luth. Student Assoc., Ma u n d y
Thursday Communion Service, March
26, 7:15 p.m., Lutheran Student Chapel,
Forest and Hill.,

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the see-
ond in a series of articles about the
mayoral and City Council candi-
dates In the April 6 Ann Arbor elec-
tion.)
By PETER DAWSON
4
A Democrat and a Republican
are running for each of the five
City Council positions to be filled
in the April 6 Ann Arbor election.
On March 9 the Human Rela-
tions Commission recommended
to the City Council that it con-
sider giving the Commission more.
money or more authority and
consider passing legislation to al-
leviate discrimination in housing.,
Many of the Council candidates
have taken positions on the prob-
lem of discrimination. These are
half of the candidates and their
positions:
* * *
ROBERT G. FABER-(D-Warl
III) owns Faber's Fabric Stores in
Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. He is 33
years old.
Faber thinks the most import-
ant problem facing the city is the
need for comprehensive planning
for its growth. He thinks the
downtown area will need specific
attention, since if nothing is done
it will become a depressed area in
a few years and will be a drain
rather than a benefit to the city.
He "strongly" favors Urban Re-
newal, "for both humanitarian
and economic reasons."
Faber supports study of the
possibility of combining the Fire
and Police Departments to cut
costs and improve efficiency. He
claims this has worked very well
in Oak Park and other cities.
He thinks the consolidation
might possibly bear only on pro-
visions for serving areas of recent
growth..
Faber sees two issues in his
ward as especially "important.
First are.the roads into Ann Ar
bor from the east - for example,
he says, it is dangerous and dif-
ficult to get onto Washtenaw
Road from Platt, Pittsfield and
Manchester Roads. Secondly,he
favors fuller development for
Buhr Park than is now planned.
HENRY AQUINTO- (R-Ward
III) is Manager of Industrial Re-
lations at the Wayne Assembly
Plant of the Ford Motor Com-
pany. He is 39 years old.

He has served on the board of
directors of the Wayne Chamber
of Commerce, and one year he
was United Fund Drive vice-
chairman for an area including
Wayne and several other com-
munities.
Aquinto feels that master plan-
ning for the city's growth is "very
important." He advocates the en-
couragement of light industry "of
suitable types" to locate here so
as to broaden the city's tax base.
Aquinto "seriously" objects to
the idea of rerouting US-23 along
Stadium Blvd., though he thinks
its present location is poor.
He thinks that putting, it onto
Stadium would only move the
traffic from one residential area
to, another. Instead, he supports
action to get the Eastbelt high-
way built soon.
Aquinto opposes the licensing
of the tavern whose potential op-
erator has recently asked for a
license in the ward. Aquinto gives
as his reason for opposition the
facts that the area is residential.
and that the residents don't want
the tavern.
Aquinto thinks the facilities of
Buhr Park should be improved.
TED HEUSEL- (D-Ward IV)
is a sales representative with the
G. V. Airey Building Company, He
is director of the Ann Arbor Civic
Theatre and adviser to Soph
Show and the JuniUr Girls' Play.
He is 37 years old.
Heusel feels that the most im-
portant problem facing the city
is Urban Renewal. He favors the
present plan for the sake of the
residents of the area and because,
he says, if the plan is effected the
area will be able to carry its load
of the city's tax burden.
Anoth e r important- issue,
Heusel feels, is that of human re-
lations. He believes the Human
Relations Commission needs the
confidence and understanding of
the people of the people of the
city.
Zoning and planning for future:
growth is his ward's most im-
portant problem, Heusel says. He
thinks this should be part of a
master plan for the growth of the
whole city. He gives Stadium
Blvd. as an example of the re-
sults of insufficient planning.
Also, he says, Allmendinger'
Park is too distant for many chil-.
dren and too dangerous for others
who have to cross Stadium to get
to it. He says the city should de-
velop parks but of some of the
land in the ward.

WESTON VIVIAN- (D-Ward
V) is a research engineer at the
University of Michigan Research
Institute. He is program chair-
man of the Wines Schol Parent-
Teachers' Organization. He is 34
years old.
Vivian supports thorough plan-
ning for the "inevitable" growth
of the city. Haphazard growth,
he says, "costs money, upsets
community values and detracts
from pleasant family life."
For part of this growth, he says,
the city needs to attract research
and light industry, but it must
be suitable to the character of
the city.
Vivian says he has "personally
backed" Urban Renewal because
the continued deterioration in the
area has led to "miserable condi-
tions of life" for some residents
and because the area is now a
drain on the city's taxes.
Vivian feels that the city has
an obligation to end discrimina-
tion in housing soon. He says he
supports and will continue to
support the work of the Human
Relations Commission.
The parks in his ward, Vivian
says, are "nearly dormant" for
lack of equipment. He advocates
getting them more equipment,
within the present city budget.
BENT F. NIELSEN -- (R-Ward
V) has been part owner of a local
flower shop and greenhouse for
24 years. A Navy veteran, he is a
member of the Veterans of For-
eign Wars and the American Le-
gion. He Is 44 years old.
He has served three years on
the Washtenaw County Board of
Supervisrs, two on the Perry Nur-
sery. School Board, and two as
treasurer of the Slauson School
Parent-Teachers' Organization.
Nielsen- thinks Urban Renewal
is the most important issue facing
the city. He does not favor the
present plopn,'because he is wor-
ried. about the people whose
homes would be removed and
about the workers - for example
the sixty-odd ones in the slaugh-
terhouse to be removed under the
present pla~n - who might lose
their jobs because the area would
be rezoned largely residential.
The most important issues in
his ward, Nielsen feels, concern
its development - the establish-
ment of recreational facilities, in-
cluding Veterans' Memorial Park
and possibly something near
where two schools are being built;
orderly annexation in the future:
storm sewers and street lights for
the' new Lakewood Subdivision;
and careful planning where the
new Northbelt highway will go
through the ward.

1

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NO 2-3136

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From The Broadway
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