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February 11, 1959 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
RESERVES TRIUMPH IN CANADA:
g Ten; Wolverine Swimmers Show Strength in Double Bill
T 1T a

By BILL ZOLLA
Divided but not conquered was
the motto of the Michigan swim
squad over the past weekend.
Although the team was split
into two segments to enable some
of the swimmers to give an exhi-
bition at the Father and Son's
Banquet at the Detroit A. C., the
reserve depth again proved strong
enough to win in the competition
with Western Ontario.
Ten of the first line performers
including Captain Cy Hopkins,
Dick Hanley, Frank Legacki, and
Tony Tashnick made the trip with
Assistant Coach Bruce Harlan to
Detroit, and some truly amazing
times were recorded.
Unofficial Record _
Legacki, swimming a g a i n s t

Tashnick in the 100-yd. butterfly,
not only beat the NCAA titlist but
bettered Tashnick's world record
covering the distance in the time
of :54.1. Because there were only
two timers instead of the neces-
sary three, the mark cannot be
considered official and Tashnick's
time of :54.3 will remain.
Hanley, swimming alone
against the watch, bettered the
accredited world standard of
1:21.2 in the 150-yd. freestyle by
churning the yardage in 1:21.1.
This time is also unofficial.
In the 50-yd. freestyle, Legacki
and Carl Woolley put on a tight
duel, with Woolley winning by a
scant margin. The victor's time
was :22.6 while second place was

clocked in :22.7. In the 100-yd.
backstroke, John Smith edged
Alex Gaxiola in the good time of
:58.5.
Wolverines Triumph
In the regulation meet against
Western Ontario, the Wolverines
triumphed, 66-48. Coach Gus
Stager reached deep into his bag
of strength and came up with
some outstanding performances,
from four sophomores, Dave Gil-

landers, Ron Clark, Harry Huf-
faker, and Ernie Meissner.
Gillanders, filling in for Tash-
nick, won the 200-yd, butterfly in
the time of 2:08.3, his best time
to the present. The second soph,
Ron' Clark captured the 200-yd.
breaststroke in 2:25.4.
Huffaker, swimming in his first
varsity meet took the 150-yd. in-
dividual medley, and Meissner
swept the diving.

Scores
NBA
Minneapolis 118, Cincinnati 110
St. Louis vs. Detroit (postponed)
COLLEGE
Virginia Tech 104, Richmond 66
N. C. state 80, Duke 7?
Pitt. 75, Carnegie Tech 65
Kent: State 86, John Carroll 64
G. Washington 66, Md. 65 (overtime
Clarion (Pa.) Teachers 95, Slippery
Rock 75
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