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March 25, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TW M~TV",'T.

A TV

ON THE LOCAL SCENE:
Ann Arbor Council Candidates Discuss Issues.

r UNCLE' ' , .1

Speech Department Group
To Give 'The Mousetrap'

I WANTS

YOU !

i

WWWAUM14F

- -
..-.....

NOW

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DIAL
NO 2-3136

M-IC KEY.no one's gonna
Idrag me down
The Last Mile
AVO ty-alive!"

(Continued from Page 1)
Harold J. McKercher (R-Ward
I) has owned a local real estate
and insurance agency since 1945.
He has served as business man-
ager of the Fresh Air Camp for
four summers.
He has been active in the Metho-
dist Church, Chamber of Com-
merce, Ann Arbor Masonic Lodge
and Ann Arbor and Michigan as-
sociations of insurance agents. He
is on the board of directors of the
Michigan Association for Retarded
Children and is regional Vice-
President of the National Insti-
tute of Farm Brokers. He is 52
years old.
McKercher believes that owners
of deteriorated property should be,
encouraged to improve it. He with-
holds his final decision whether he
favors Urban Renewal until the
plan is finally developed and more
fully explained. He urges that the
residents and taxpayers who would
be affected by the plan be con-
sulted fully before it is put into
effect.
In his ward, McKercher feels,
the traffic problem in the areas of
the hospitals and the North Cam-
pus is the most serious immediate
problem. He suggests one solution
might be more offstreet parking.
Alicia Dwyer (D-Ward I) is a
supervisor in the business adminis-
tration school. She has been on
the City Council for two years,
serving also on the Taxicab Board
and the Citizens' Recreation
Board. She is 30 years old.
Have a WORLD of FUN!
o (ravel with $ITA
Unbelievable Low Cost
nE top
60 Deys t from $645
43-65 Day, s4'eAe from $999
5EE flRMany tours btclude
colle gecredit.
Also low-cost trips to Mexico
$169 up, South America $699 up,
Hawaii Study Tour $549 up and
Around the World $1798 up.
,Ask Your Travel Agent
Year FWOouimTRAVEL. I*9.

A one-act play, "The Mouse-
Trap," by William Dean Howells
will be presented at 4:10 p.m.
today in Trueblood Auditorium, as
the second in this semester's
series on the speech department's
Laboratory Theatre Bill.
Although there are perhaps
better known literary "mouse-
traps" than this 1880 farce, few
of these can provide more laughs
in a half-hour's time than this
ever-modern sketch from the pen
of one of America's first literary
realists.
Though the surface issue in the
play is women's suffrage, the far-
cical implications are concerned
with the universally moot ques-
tion, "Which is the stronger sex?"
The role of the man caught In
his own mousetrap is played by
Ty McConnell, '61. Hilda Gage,
'60, will play the part of the fem-
inine antagonist, while Susan

Ecker, '61, Cecile Weinstein, '61,
Sally Tozer, '61, and Valjoan Ur-
ban, '61, will play visiting women.
Kay Delle Smith, '59, will be
seen as the maid.
~spaim.' Closes
A color motion picture on
"Spain" will close the Burton
Holmes travelogue series at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow in Hill Auditorium.
Sponsored by University Plat-
form Attractions, the film tour
will include modern Madrid with
its plazas, avenues and the Na-
tional Palace; Toledo, home of El
Greco and Grenada with "the
world's supreme architectural
treasure," Alhambra.

-Daily-David Arnold
COUNCIL MEETING-The Ann Arbor City Council discusses a controversial issue at a recent
meeting. Standing up is Ann Arbor's outgoing mayor, Prof. Samuel J. Eldersveld of the political
science department. Elections for the mayor's office and for five Council seats, one from each of the
city's five wards, will be held April 6. One Democrat and one Republican is running for each position.

ORGANIZATION NOTICES

":1 .

i.

One of the prime issues before
Ann Arbor, Miss Dwyer says, is
the support of the new city char-
ter, adopted in 1955. It needs clari-
fication and amendment in a few
places, she says, but on the whole
it is "an extremely efficient instru-
ment of government."
She feels that discrimination is
"a critical issue." She says she
will support the recommendations
recently made by the Human Rela-
tions Commission.
She also supports Urban Re-
newal because, she says, she sees
no other means to its goal of giving
the residents of the area "decent
houses and neighborhoods."
She supports the establishment
of a municipal trash collection.
She quotes Dr. Otto K. Engelke,.
City and County Health Officer, as
saying that present methods of
trash disposal offer considerable
danger of epidemics.
This is especially important in
her ward, she says, since the main

route to the dump is there and it
is continually littered.
Also important in her ward, she
says,, is the development of parks,
including tennis courts particu-
larly.
*'*
Mrs. Florence R. Crane (R-
Ward ID is the wife of Prof. H. R.
Crane of the physics department.
She has been city councilman from
her ward for the past two years.
She has been active in the Citi-
zens' Council, the League of Wom-
en Voters, the American Associa-
tion of University Women, and the
Faculty Women's Club. She is 47
years old.
An important issue which will,
come up soon, Mrs. Crane feels, is
that of replacing the present zon-
ing ordinance, which was adopted
in 1923.
She feels that the kinds of re-
strictions on land use for which it
provides are sometimes unclear
and sometimes behind the times,

From The Broadway
Stage Success

and that its procedures for zoning
make it cumbersome.
Mrs. Crane feels that one of her
ward's most important problems
is that of moving US-23 out of
the ward.,
She also thinks that the traffic
and parking problems in the State
St., Main St. and South University
shopping areas, all in her ward,
should be worked on.
William K. Marshall (D-Ward
II) is assistant' manager of Bob
Marshall's Book Shop. He has at-
tended the University and Cornell
College in Iowa. He served as a
lieutenant in the paratroops in
the Korean War. He is 28 years
old.
Marshall thinks discrimination
is one of the city's most important
problems. He thinks it is "a com-
plex and delicate" problem but
feels an ordinance is "the only
real solution."
.He thinks a fair ordinance could
be arrived at through public de-
bate. He has no final opinion about
how it should be phrased.
He supports the present Urban
Renewal plan. He proposes that
the city move ahead on it as fast
as possible "consistent with eco-
nomy and my concernffor avoiding
discrimination in the result."
Marshall is interested in the
profitable use of the Huron River.
He supports the Huron River
Watershed Inter -Governmental
Committee in its study of the
problems in the use of the river
for recreation and for sewage dis-

Am. Chemical Soc.-Student Affiliate,
Student Papers (Szanto, Johnson), Mar.
25, 7:30 p.m., 1300 Chem.
Democratic Socialist Club, Mar. 25,
8:15 p.m., Union, 3-C. Speaker: Dr.
Parikh, "Politics in India."
'o * * .
Grad. Hist. Club, Faculty Panel, Mar.
25, 8 p.m., Rackham, Assembly Hall.
* * *
Grad. Student Coffee Hour, Mar. 25,
4-5:30 p.m., Rackham, 2nd Floor-W.
Lounge. All grad, students Invited.
s* * w*
La Sociedad Hispanica, Informal
Meeting-Slides, Film, Refreshments, 8
p.m., 3050 F.B. Everybody welcome.

PLUS
VICTOR MATURE
in "ESCORT WEST"

Luth. Student Assoc., Holy Com-
munion Service, Mar. 25, 7:15 p.m.,
Luth. Student Chapel,Forest & Hill.
Roger Williams Guild, Choir Pre-
sentation of Stainers "Crucifixion" and
Holy Communion, Mar. 28, 8 p.m., 1st
Baptist Church Sanctuary.
,* * *
Stud. Chapter ASCE, 'Meeting, Mar.
25, 7:30 p.m., Union, 3rd Floor Conf.
Rm. Speaker: Phillip McCallister, U.S.
Corps of Engineers, "Hydroelectric De-
sign Construction & Testing."
Young Republicans, Dinner-$ p.m.,
101 Union; Reception--7:30 p.m., Kala-
mazoo i. League for Mrs. N. Burgess
and Fred. Matthaei, Mar. 25.

a magazine .of international folklore
* SONGS
* ARTICLES OF SPECIAL INTEREST
* RECORD LISTINGS
---A MUST FOR ALL FOLK MUSIC LOVERS-
Now on Sale at Marshall's & The Blue Front
U of M Folklore Society

r____._

----

--- ,d

- I

s'

THE TAREYTON Here's why Tareyton's Dual Filter
filters a single filter can:
1.V It combines an efficient pure white outer
filter....
MdIARKS HE2. with a unique inner filter of ACTIVATED
THE . cHARCOAL....which has been definitely
proved to make the smoke of a cigarette
REAL HINGmilder and smoother.
REAL THING
THE REAL THING IN MILDNESS...THE REAL THING IN FINE TOBACCO TASTE!
Lesson for today: In a few short months, New Dual Filter Tareytons have
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campus smoke shop.

"Your est Bet - Call A Vet"
VE TEIR AN'S CAB
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SERVICE TO
WILLOW RUN and WAYNE MAJOR

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24-our Service

MAIL ORDERS NOW'
Ben, Jonson's Comic Satire"

' l
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STARTS
TODAY

A1

DIAL
NO 8-6416

Our Great Pre-Easter Program-
On A Perfume
f Pillow...
The Strangest
Pact Ever Sworn
..The Most
k Diabolical Crime
A Man And
Mistress Ever Conceived!
' eem MICHELE MORGAN- DANIEL GELIN 7,Wt Peter Van Eyck-Beerrd BhA
_trcted by Oenys de Is P ftI'* .. -h, ,an.ve? Oyames Hadley Chs
PLUS A GO-FOR-GOOFINESS
PICTURE, STRICTLY FOR LAUGHS

'-4;-

posal.
In his ward, Marshall would like
to see further development of Gal-
lup Park. He iscalso interested in
a master traffic-flow plan, with
one of its goals the keeping to a
minimum of traffic in residential
areas.
City To Vote
On Salaries
This April 6, voters will be of-
fered a chance to increase the
range of salary offered'their mu-
nicipal judge, according to Miss
Alicia Dwyer, Supervisor of the
Business Administration School
and City councilwoman.
At their meeting last February
2, the City Council voted to place
this resolution on the ballot. The
reason for this, Miss Dwyer said,
"is to bring the municipal judge's
salary more in line with the salary
of other city jobs."
The present salary range of the
municipal judge is from $4,000 to
$9,000 and the proposed increased
range would be from $7,000 to
$16,000. Miss Dwyer said, "we in-
tend neither to place the salary at
the maximum or minimum, but
this will give us a better range
with which to work."
According to present municipal
judge Francis L. O'Brien, "the
salary of an elected official can-
not be raised during his term in
office, and since the term of mu-
nicipal judge is a six year term,
the availability of a salary increase
for the job would not become a
possibility until 1962."
Judge O'Brien pointed out some
of the reasons salaries of court of-
ficials in the state have lagged be-
hind those of other positions.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

Presented by U. of M. Dept. of Speech
Lydia M endelssohTeae

OLPO

APRIL

9,

10, 11-8 P.M.

M. t . ^ A 111I r11b 1 1 i lli1 'I /IIi Y iM 11 1

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FILL OUT and. send to: play production, box office Lydia

i
t:

Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann Arbor, enclose stamped, self-ad-
dressed envelope, rake check payable to "Play Production".

I

ENCLOSED FIND $_for
TICKETS TO "VOLPONE" ON (CIRCLE ONE)
THURS., APR. 9; FRI., APR. 10; SAT., APR. 11.

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Name

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