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March 22, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MARCH
TrNLAND GRANT COLLEGES:
WAY1 har oe Schools Debate Values of Forced 1101

22, 1959
[C

''4

By RUTH ANN RECHT
Land grant colleges throughout
the country have been debating
the question of abolishing com-
pulsory Reserve Officers Training
Corps.
At the present time only two of
these colleges have abolished com-
pulsory ROTC, the University of

Minnesota and Pennsylvania
State University. Beginning with
student protests and the forma-
tion of an Anti-Compulsory Mili-
tary Drill League, the campaigns
grew into student mass meetings,
circulation of petitions among
faculty, students, state legislators
and citizens of the state, finally

T

aiF o

By ANITA FELDMAN
Making his Ann Arbor debut, in
the final concert of the Univer-
sity's Choral Union Series, Andre
Tchaikowsky, a young Polish'
pianist, will perform at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow in Hill Auditorium.
The 21-year-old artist will de-
vote the first half of his program
to Mozart's "Fantasia" and "Son-
ata in C minor," and the second
half to "Twenty-Four Preludes,
Op. 28" by Chopin. This will be
only the second time in the his-
tory of Choral Union Concerts

1 U

REAH SADOWSKY
... to perform ,
that all 24 of the Chopin preludes
have been played at one time.
The pianist's career, began at
the age of nine when he won en-
trance to the State School of
Music in Lodz, Poland. He was
later sent, under g ov ernment

backing, to the National Conserv-
atory in Paris, where he won the
first medal of the Conservatory.
Returning to his native home,
he made his first public appear-
ance at the Chopin competition
in Warsaw and was one of the
winners. A year later, he entered
the Queen Elizabeth competition
in Brussels, where again he was a
winner. .
Tchaikowsky is at present work-
ing on a concerto, and is appear-
ing in Chicago with the orchestra
in concert and in a recital.
Under the baton of William D.
Revelli, the University's Sym-
phony Band will present its an-
nual spring concert at 4:15 p.m.
today in Hill Auditorium.
The first portion of the after-
noon's program will be devoted to
four works by Handel, in com-
memoration of the two-hundredth
anniversary of the composer's
death. "Suite for Band"; the ballet
suite "The Gods Go a-Begging";
the Royal Fireworks Music"; and
the "Water Music" have been
chosen for presentation.
Original band works by con-
temporary composers will be fea-.
tured on the second half of the
program, opening with "Symphony
in B Flat" by Hindemith and
"Legend" by Creston, the first
band work of this composer.
The program will then continue
with the premiere Ann Arbor per-
formance of "Polka and Waltz"
from the opera-ballet "The Good
Soldier Schweik" by Kurka, and
will conclude with William Schu-
mann's "Newsreel in Five Shots."
The University's Stanley Quartet
will present a memorial concert at
8:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Rackham
Lecture Hall.
The concert will honor Helen M.
Titus, associate professor of piano
in the School of Music, who died
December 19, 1958.
Included on the program will be
"Quartet in G major, K. 387" by
Mozart; "Five Pieces for String
Quartet" by Bassett; and Schu-
bert's "Quaiet in D minor, Op.
Posth."
The Quartet members, Gilbert
Rossand Gustave' Rosseels, violin;
Oliver Edel, cello; and Robert
Courte, viola, are all on the fac-
ulty of the University's music
school.
Reah Sadowsky, nationally-
known pianist who has performed
with the New York Philharmonic,
the Cleveland Orchestra, and the
Boston Symphony Orchestra, will
be featured soloist of the Ann
Arbor Civic Symphony at 7 p.m.
today in the Ann Arbor High
School Auditorium.
On the program will be "Chor-
ale" from "Easter Cantata" by
Bach; "Symphony No. 8" by
Beethoven; Weinberger's "Polka
and Fugue" from "Schwanda";
and Grieg's "Piano Concerto in A
minor."
Miss Sadowsky isalso a com-
poser and has many published
compositions to her credit.
Regents Alter
Degree Name
The Regents at their meeting
Friday approved changing the
name of one of the degrees offered
by the College of Architecture and
Design.
The degree is in landscape ar-
chitecture. It will be changed from
Bachelor of Science in Landscape
Architecture to Bachelor of Land-
scape Architecture.

focusing on the Board of Regents.
Now several other schools are
seeking to abolish this training.
Editorials and letters have been
written to many papers. At Ohio
State University seven weeks of
planning resulted in a campaign,
taking the form of campus-wide
petitions.
According to the petition, the
ROTC program is "essential to'
the university but it should not be
compulsory for all male students."
It should be for those students
who are "interested in or inclined
toward" ROTC.
The petition said further that
the purpose of producing qualified
military officers is not being ful-
filled because too much time and
money is wasted on those who do
not desire "officer training."
President Novice G. Fawcett
gave the position of the adminis-
tration. "The question of compul-
sory military training has been
raised periodically, and the Board
of Trustees, which has the final
say, has gone on record as favor-
ing the continuation of compul-
sory training," he said.
An editorial in the Michigan
State News said, "You, the stu-
dents have a say in such matters.
If you want ROTC changed you
can do it by letting your represen-
tatives both in Lansing and on
campus, know about it. Petition
the state board. State your case
calmly and responsibly. Stick to
it and it is sure to change."

At the University of Wisconsin
argun ents against compulsory
ROTC were presented to the fac-
ulty's University committee by
three student leaders speaking
from three different points of
view.
The students also announced
that a bill is being drafted for the
state legislature to repeal the sec-
tion of the state statutes which
prescribes compulsory military
training for freshmen and sopho-
mores.
The pro-compulsory ROTC ar-
gument that compulsory basic
training is necessary in order to
have an advanced corps assumes
that freshmen are incapable of
making mature deosions, one of
the students said. They agreed
that a program of informing in-
coming freshmen about the ROTC
would be desirable under a volun-
teer program.
Upon hearing the bill that is
coming up for fegislation, State
Senator William Clark, chairman
of the Senate Education commit-
tee said, "Ikn not at all enthusias-
tic about abolishing ROTC. Young
men should get military training
and this is a cheap and efficient
way to get it."
At the University of Oregon the
student senate voted to investi-
gate the policy for compulsory
training. It criticized ROTC as
being dogmatic, and was not in
line with the liberal arts aspect
of the university.

i

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I: ORGANIZATION NOTICESj
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B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Sup-
per Club, delicatessen supper, March
22, 6 p.m., 1429 Hill.
* * *
Graduate Outing Club, hiking, March
22, 2 p.m., meet in back of Rackham
(n.w. entrance).
* * *
Intern'tl Folk Dancers, instruction
and dancing, March 23, 7:30 'p.m., Lane
Hall.
* * *
Mich. Christian Fellowship, March
22, 4 p.m., Lane Hall. Speaker: Rev. B.
Hess, "If Easter Wasn't."
* * *
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
March 22,. 7:30 p.m., Presbyterian

Church. Speaker: Dr. Haroutunian,
"Christian Response to Society."
Lutheran Student Assoc., presenta-
tion of T. S. Eliot's "Murder In the
Cathedral." March 22, 7 p.m., Luth.
Stud. Center, Forest and Hill.
SGC Public Relations Comm., neet-
ing, March 24, 4 p.m., 1548 SAB. New
members welcome or call Ron Bassey,
chairman, NO 3-3307.
Gamma Delta - Luth. Stud. Club,
supper and program, March 22, 6 p.m.,
U. Luth. Stud. Center, 1511 Washtenaw.
Play: "The Sign of Jonah," by Wayne
State U. Gamma Delta.

I

.a
s

"I

Explorers Falter, Fumble
As Geology Field Trip Rocks

J

I

protection but to be identified for
questioning.
Students commenced to mea-
sure rock layers, describe the
rocks, identify fossils nd state
their environment of deposition.
An unfossilized beer can was iden-
tified as 3.2 with the environment
of deposition - a University stu-
dent.'
Cries of "Trilobite, trilobite,
who's got a trilobite they'll trade
for a crinoid?" and "What's
this?" were frequently heard.
Aside from a bus-sick rider,
there were several other tragedies.
Two students attempted to jump
from one rock layer to the next
and landed in mud that oozed up
to their ankles. They jumped
again, leaving their shoes behind.
Foot Sinks
A coed experimentally extended
one foot and felt it sink, crusting
her shoe and sock. She was res-
cued by two male students who
dragged her out and then carried
her shoe over to the 15-foot deep
lake for a one-minute wash./
In an attempt to get net bryo-
zoans out of a rock, one student
raised his hammer and brought
it down hard - on his finger.
After one and a half hours of
fighting the ever-present wind
and the past stream and glacier-
deposited fsosils, the geologists re-
traced their steps past a small
shanty, lacking only a half moon
on the door.
Bob Fleishman, '61, summar-
ized: "It was a pretty rocky trip."

TONIGHT at 8:00
LOESSER AND ABBOTT'S MUSICAL
Where's Charlie?
with
RAY BOLGER, ALLYN McLAREE,
ROBERT SHACKLETON
SHORT: LAMENT
*r
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

t

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6.

' ' !' T. _.'

STARTS
TODAY

A Rowdy, Riotous, Romantkal

DIAL
NO 2-3136

WHY IS IT THAT MOTION PICTURES
WHICH DEAL WITH LIFE

As IT REALLY IS...
ARE CALLED
SHOCKING!
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