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March 20, 1959 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-20

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195 9 s

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

[2G, 1959 THE iWICHIGAW DAILY

1 S1LA L! Ai.

Kites, Frisbies Announce Spring;
Coeds Bare Feet, Skip Classes

WESTERN THEME:
Field Events, Canoe Races
To Begin Spring Weekend

Sete

Thursday

-Daily-Juan Rodriguez
SPRING SPRINGS-Jocular students whoop it up outside the
Law Quad as spring greets the world two days earlier than the
calendar stipulates. The lovely weather had ill effects only on
classroom attendance, as students claimed spring fever.
TO BEGIN TODAY:
Students Set To Participate
In Weekend NSA Seminar

By NORMA SUE WOLFE
March finally came in with a
great big "Ba-ah" but the Ypsi-
lanti weatherman predicts the
lamb won't live too long.
Yesterday's 62 degrees was three
below the highest on record-1948.
March 19 reached an all-time low
of 13 degrees in 1950.
The prediction for today reads
fair and mild, with a high near 60
degrees. Saturday will be cloudy'
with occasional rain and a general
cooling-off trend.
Expecting Rain
"We're expecting nothing but
rain from now on, but chances are
100 per cent that it may still snow
again," the weatherman said.
In the Law Club, future dignified
men of the cloak flew kites, while
East Quadders played frisbie.
One co-ed cut all classes and
spent the afternoon in the ceme-
tery on the Hill. She found it
"lively."
-The advent of trenchcoats, blaz-
ers and sweaters was other evi-
dence that spring has sprung.
Cotton bermudas pedalled bikes
previously in hibernation.
Barefoot Gal
One winter skirt and sweater-
clad coed wasseen walking bare-
foot on East Huron St. Two others,
standing on the front steps of
Angell Hall, were wishing for a
breezeless spot to sunbathe in.
Overheard after a lunge in a
Women's Athletic Building fencing
class was: "Spring is here, the
grass is riz; I wonder where the
flowers is."
Wolverine Club
Announces New
Senior Officers
The new executive officers of
the Wolverine Club have been an-
nounced by Joel Levine, '60, the
outgoing president of the club.
Robert M. Baer, '60BAd., was
elected president, Judy Meyers,
'60, vice-president, Jennie Carlton,
'60, treasurer and Molly Maxwell,
'60Ed., Secretary.
Petitioning is now open for the
chairmanship of the Pep Rally,
Block M, Publicity, and Special
Events Committees. The petitions
may be picked up at the Wolver-
ine Club office in the SAB today
through Thursday from 3-5 p.m.

"Tippicanoe and The Island,
Too" is the theme for spring Week-
end's Western Friday afternoon of
field events and canoe races.
At 12:30 p.m. the canoes will
make their entry near the island.
ICC To Hold
Open Houses
The Inter-Copoerative Council
will sponsor open-open houses in
all of its eight residences Sunday,
"in order to acquaint the Univer-
sity with the way of living in co-
operative housing," Neil Munro,
'60, president of the Council an-
nounced.
Open houses will be held from
2 to 5 p.m. in Michigan House, 315
N. State, 'John Nakamura House,
807 S. State and Robert Owen
House, 1017 Oakland. All are
men's co-ops.
The women's co-ops are Muriel
Lester House, 900 Oakland, Harold
Osterweil House, 338 E. Jefferson,
A. K. Stevens House, 816 Forest
and Mark VIII House, 917 Forest.
There is also a married stu-
dent's cooperative, B r awn d e is
House at 803 Kingsley.
"The purpose of Co-op Week is
to furnish interested University
students an opportunity to learn
about cooperative living," Munro
said.
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A pre-race parade will being at
1 pm. to be followed by special
canoe races.
All housing units are encouraged
to enter, co-chairman Fred Nott,
'59E, said. These include profes-
sional fraternities and residence
halls as well as social fraternities
and sororities. Individual housing
units may enter with or without
another housing unit.
CanoeInformation
Canoes should be obtained with-
in the residence units if possible.
If none are available, Nott noted
that the canoe ,liveries should be
open in time for the race.
Points will be awarded for the
best costumes and for the first
three places in the race. Costumes
are to be appropriate to the west-
ern theme with inexpensiveness
and originality emphasized.
Holders of the first three places
in the costume contest will receive
17, 15 and 13 points respectively.
The point order for the canoe
race will be 33, 30 and 27 points.
Field Events To Start
At 3 p.m. the field events will
begin. Each house will originate its
own and then challenge another
house to play.
Applications for these events
must be returned to the Spring
Weekend Office in the Union by
Tuesday.

For Petition
Closing Date
Petitions for the Ethel A. Mc-
Cormick Scholarship for junior
women will be available until
Thursday at the League Under-
graduate Office, Gayle Burns,
'59Ed., chairman of the committee
handling the scholarship, said yes-
terday.
Three scholarships of $100 each
are awarded on the basis of need,
scholastic achievement 'and par-
ticularly on participation in activi-
ties, Miss Burns said. The fund
was established in the name of
Mrs. McCormick, who was social
director of the League for many

9

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years, she added.
Short interviews with eachj
plicant will be scheduled for
week of April 6, she said,

ap-
the

TODAY at 6 P.M.
HILLEL
SUPPER CLUB
HOT DOGS, PASTRAMI,
CORNED BEEF
Members: 75c
Non-Members: $1.50
HILLEL FOUNDATION
429 Hill Street

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By JEAN HARTWIG
An International Students Rela-
tions Seminar will begin today at
the University, Carol Holland, '60,
chairman of the Student Govern-
ment Council National and Inter-
national Affairs Committee, an-
nounced.
Sponsored by the Michigan Re-
gion of the National Students As-
sociation, the conference will begin
at 3 p.m. today, concluding at 4
p.m. Sunday in the Michigan
Union. Its purpose is to discuss
the roles and problems of foreign
students at various universities.
The 15 participants will include
representatives from Wayne State
University, Marygrove College,
Ferris Institute, Flint Junior Col-
lege and Central Michigan College.
To Represent 'U'
Robert Krohn, '60, and Miss
Holland will represent the Uni-
versity.
Resource personnel for the three-
day seminar will be Cynthia Shel-
don, World University Service field
secretary; Ahmed Belkhodja,
Grad., and Irving Stolberg, USNSA
Campus International Administra-
tor. Sue Rockne, '60, is assistant
director of the conference.
Today the group will discuss the
'Pee Wee' Hunt
Set To Entertain
At Military Ball
This year's Military Ball, "Shen-
andoah," will feature Pee Wee
Hunt and his orchestra.
The dance, to be held tonight,
is open to cadets, midshipmen and
officers of the armed forces at the
University for nearby stations. In
addition to these, foreign officers
are invited to attend. Officers from
six nations will attend the dance. '
Tickets for the dance, the prop-
er dress for which will be dress
uniform, are available at ROTC
offices or from members of the
Pershing Rifles.
Hunt, a graduate in electrical
engineering from the Ohio State
University, has been appearing in
the Detroit area in recent months.
He plays the trombone, leading
his baud in both jazz and dance-
able numbers.

history and development of the
International Student movement
and examine specific problem areas
of the world such as Algeria, Hun-
gary, Cuba and South Africa.
To Speak on Exchange
At 9:30 a.m. Krohn will speak on
student exchange programs, while
Barbara Ann Miller, '61, and Belk-
hodja will discuss the Foreign
Student Leadership Project. Rob-
ert Arnove, '59, vice-president of
the International Students Asso-
ciation, will also speak on the
International Week program.
During the afternoon the group
will consider the cultural and so-
cial problems of the international
student on American university
campuses. Miss Holland will lead
the discussion of planning pro-
grams for foreign students.
To Promote Awareness
The purpose of the RISRS is
to promote a wider awareness and
understanding among the parti-
cipants and to provide practical
background and stimulation for
the best possible campus, regional
and national leadership.
The seminar has been held at
the University for the past two
years, Miss Holland explained. All
representatives to the conference
have been provided with informa-
tion giving background material
in areas to be covered by the dis-
cussions.
Junior Colleges
To Tour 'U' Today
Students attending junior col-
leges throughout.Michigan will be
on campus today for the annual
Union sponsored Michigan Day.
Junior college students will at-
tend a welcome assembly in the
morning and then they will take
a general tour of the campus and
visit the many open houses at the
respective schools and colleges of
the University.
Academic counselling for those'
students planning to attend the
University next year will also be
available in the morning.
Immediately following a lunch-
eon at the Union, admission coun-
sellors will be available to help
prospective students

Fly U. S. Routes First .. .
Internationally Later
Imagine yourself winging your way to
America's most fascinating cities . . . or spanning the "oceans to
European capitols on the silver wings
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this could happen to you! Ahead
of you lies an exciting, profitable
i future as a TWA hostess. You earn
as you learn with TWA. You
fly free on your TWA pass. You
meet new people, make new friends.
If you can meet these
qualifications... are between
pry ?20-27; are 5 '2' to 5V'8 and weigh
between 100 and 135 lbs....
2 years business experience or
the equivalent of college, or nurse's training
have a clear complexion . .
good vision ...
and are unmarried ... then begin
your career as a TWA hostess
by contacting:
MR. T. W. DICKENSON
TWA Suite
Sheraton Cadillac Hotel, Detroit
TUESDAY, MARCH 24
*9 A.M. to 4 P.M.

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Got your Giffle neck yet?
LAST DAY
of SALE,
Saturday, March 21st

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