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March 15, 1959 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILI

Back MSU
Staff Power'
Suggestions

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

There is a Difference in
DIAMONDS

(Continued from Page 5)

(Continued from Page 1)

RUSSIAN TANKS-The Branderburger Tor looms through the misty Berlin fog, under the muzzle
of a Soviet tank. The tank is part of the Soviet War Memorial, a tiny Russian bastion inside the
Western Sector. It was constructed before the boundary lines were drawn and the West allowed it
to remain.
isF
Iln alet VOred b anyinWest

changes in the academic atmos-
phere. Here at the University we
must move more slowly, but the
changes are more deeply rooted!
when they come."
The "deep roots" are necessary
because "the faculty is the heart
of an institution," Robertson con-
tinued. "You cannot effect a last-
ing curriculum change unless you
have the support of the faculty.
Here, things are pretty well de-
centralized."
At Michigan State, controversy
broke out last December, when
eight professors in the engineering
and communications skills colleges
sent separate reports on their
schools to the national Americant
Association of University Profes-
sors. The reports complained about
what they called "dictatorial tac-
tics."
The Washington office declined
to investigate the affair until the
complaints came through the local
AAUP chapter. The local received
"at least one direct complaint," an
official said.
Prof. Kenneth Macrorie of MSU's
communication skills college, pres-
ident of the MSU teachers' union,
said the English and political
sciencehdepartments are already
operating under the proposals to
be submitted in April. Various
other departments take occasional
votes on curriculum, but not as
standard policy.

Processing, Convair Astronautics Div.,
San Diego. Calif. Mon., March 16, 3:30
p.m., Rm. 104,E. Engrg. Bldg.
May Festival Lecture Series. 7:00 P.M.
Rm. 206 Burton Tower. This series of
six lectures will concentrate on a study
and analysis of the major works to
be performed in the 1959 May Festival
program. Six weeks (omitting April 1).
$10.00. Associate Professor Theodore E.
Heger, instructor.
University Lecture, auspices of the
Dept. of Psychiatry. "The Era of Group
Psychotherapy." S. R. Slavson, Editor-
in - Chief, International Journal of
Group Psychotherapy. 8:00 P.M., Tues.,
Ma 17.Children's Psychiatric Hospital
Concerts
Student Recital: Paul Lehman, bas-
soon, Rackham Assembly Hall, Tues.,
March 17, 8:30 P.M., in partial fulfill-
ment of the requirements for the de-
gree of Master of Music (Wind Instru-
ments). Assisted by Roth Biggerstaff,
pianist, and Ruth Lehman, horn, Wil-
liam Scribner, bassoon, Kenneth Holm,
oboe and John Mohler, clarinet.
Student Recital: Vincent Paul
Schneider, French horn, Aud. A, Angell
Hail, Sun., March 15, 8:30 p.m. Assist-
ed by Joyce┬░ Zel, pianist, and by Janet
Ast, soprano, Gary Stolisteiner, trum-
pet, and Robert Hause, trombone. In
lieu of a thesis for the degree of Master
of Music.
Academic Notices
Engineering Mechanics S e m i n a r%
Mon., March 18, 3:30 p.m., Rm. 101, W.'
Engrg. Bldg. Bertram Herzog, Dept. of
Engrg. Mech. "Some Elementary Appli-
cations of a Differential Analyzer to
Problems of Mechanics."
Am. Humanist Assoc. Meet. Mich.
Union, Rm. 3B. Tues., March 17, 8:00
p.m. Prof. Leslie A. White, Dept. of
Anthro. "Cultural Anthropology and
Human Values."
Doctoral Examination: Michael Elias
Marmura, Near Eastern Studies; thesis:
"The Conflict over the World's Pre-
Eternity in the Tahafuts of Al-Ghazali
and Ibn Rushd," Mon., March 16, 2032
Angell Hall, 4:00 p.m. Chairman, G. F.
Hourani.
Placement Notices
Beginning with Mon., March 16, the
following schools will be at the Bureau
of Appointments to interview prospec-
tive teachers for the 1959-1960 school
year.
Mon~ March 16:
New Hyde Park, N.Y. - Eng.; Math;
Physics; Health; Chem.; Mech. .Draw.;
Guid.; Bus. Ed.
Warren, Mich.
Tues., March 17:
Birmingham, Mich. - Elem.; Math;
Latin; Spanish; French; English; Gen-
eral Science.
Warren, Mich.
Wed., March 18:
Birmingham, Mich.
Byron Center, Mich. - Vocal/Instr.
Music; French or Latin/Speech; Home
Ec.; Counseling.
Thurs., March 19:
Jackson, Mich. - Speech Corr.; Visit.

Schr.; Type C_2-Ment. Hand.: School
Diagnostician,
Livdnia, Mich. (Clarenceville School)
-Elem.; Eng.; Sci.; Comm.; Ind. Arts;
Driver Ed,
Milford, Mich. (Huron Valley Schools)
-Elem.; Math or Math/Sci.; Eng.; Ind.
Arts.
S. Redford - Detroit, Mich. - Elem.;
Elem. P.E.; Elem. Libr.; JHS: Core.;
Gen. Set.; Girls Counselor: Boys P.E.;
Foreign Lang.; Remedial Read.; Spec.
Ed. - Type C; Libr.; HS: Eng./S.S.;
Math; Set.; Dr. Tr.; Boys Counselor;
Ind. Arts; Girls Health; Spec. Ed. -
Type C; Remedial Read.; Home Ec.
Fri., March 20:
Monroe County, Mich. - Sp. Corr.;
Ment. Ret. - Type A; Sch. Diag.; Dir.
of Spec. Ed.
M.u.s k.e g a n. Mich. Reeths-Puffer
School) Elem.; JHS: Eng./S.S.; Set./
Math/Counseling; HS: Eng.; :Comm.
(no shorthand); Art; Vocal Music; Re-
serve Coach.
For any additional information and
appointments, contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administration
Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
The following companies will inter-
view at the Bureau of Appointments,
4001 Admin., Ext. 3371. For an inter-
view appointment, contact the Bureau.
Thurs., March 19:
IBM, Poughkeepsie, New York. Open-
ings for Men and Women with BA "or
MA, BS or MS in Math, for Research
-basic, and applied.
Wed., March 25:
Jones and Laughlin Steel Corporation,
Pittsburgh, Pa. Graduates - 'June.
Men with a degree in Liberal Arts or
Business Administration for S a 1 e s
Trainees. Men with a degree in Eco-
nomics or Business Administration and
specialized in labor or industrial rela-
tions and a veteran for Industrial Re-
lations Program.
The Prudential Insurance Company
of America, Minneapolis, Minn. North
Central. Graduates - June. Men with
a degree in Liberal Arts or Business
Administration. Men with an MA in
Finance for Investment Analysis. Men
with a degree in Math for Actuarial
Training. Men with any degree and
Math, aptitude for Cost Control and
Automation.
Procter & Gamble Company, Adver-
tising Department, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Men with a degree in Liberal Arts or
Business Administration for Market-
ing-Advertising Management Program.
Thurs., March 26:
Continental Casualty Company, Chi-
cago, Ill. Graduates - June. Men and
Women with a degree in Liberal Arts i
or Business Administration.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS
Women's Christian Assoc., . ackson,
Mich. Teen Age Program Director.
City of Detroit Civil Service Comm.
exams for typist, stenographers, Tech.
aids, machine operators, accountants,
social worker and economist, Engrgs.,
city planners, Arch. Engrg. nurses,
pharmacists, technicians, hygienists,
chemists, veterinarians, etc.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
INTERVIEWS: Tues., March 17:
The Detroit Civil Service: Det. stu-
dents for jobs as camp counselors.
swimming instructors, Engrg. Aids, and
many other city jobs. Rm. D 528 S.A.B.
from 1-5.
Wed,, March 25:
SummerMarketing Job: Consumer
Power Co., Bus. Ad. and Econ. majors
for marketing job in Mich. Interviews
will be held at 3528 Admin. Bldg.
Thurs., March 19:
Camp Arbutus, Birmingham, Mich.
for Waterfront Head, Nurse, Coun-
selors.
For further information concerning
any of the above positions, Contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4001 Admin.,
Ext. 3371.

.'

4

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he newest DR. S.USS book:
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For ages i to 9-only $2$5 each:
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X-152 ON BEYOND ZEBRA
X-159 IF I RAN THE CIRCUS
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X-156 BARTHOLOMEW & THE OBLECK
For beginning reatlers
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"

Roger Seasonwein, '61, said at
Stockwell Hall, hedisagreed with
fall rush as "too educationally
disruptive" and favored spring
rush, although he felt it was not
effective under the present policy.
He noted that a great tension
is built up by deferred rush, ad-
vocated an end of contact rules
and called for an improved sys-
tem of "educating students in the
aims of affiliation."
Defining the duties of SGC
members, Meltzer told the women
that representatives must be able
to "make decisions" and "must
not be the implement of some
group."

covers. Oversize book: 8/ x 8-1 THE CAT IN THE HAT
11V4. Only $2.95 B-2 THE CAT IN THE HAT COMES BACK
Come In, Phone, fr"".. .............. r.... ....,..
or Mail FOLLETT'S, 322 S. State, NO 3-3371
'This Handy Pleasesend the DR. SEUSS BOOKS whose numbers 1,
ohave written in below
upon T ay

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Various other amazing items, too!

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I
I

GIGANTIC SPACE, MISSILE AND
JET PROJECTS AT DOUGLAS
have created outstanding
career opportunities for
SCIENTISTS - ENGINEERS -
MATHEMATICIANS
with or working on advanced degrees

FACTS ABOUT THE CONTEX
CAPACITY: 10 digits entered, 11 digits (999,999,-
999.99 ) total. -
KEYBOARD: Standard 10-key keyboard for touch-
system with either hand.
ACTUATING BAR: Complete operation with easy one-
inch stroke. Fingers remain positioned on keyboard even
when actuating bar is depressed.
SPEED: For addition, subtraction, and multiplication a
speed two to three times faster than 10-key electric ma-
chines is possible. Any user is skilled after ten minutes
instruction.
ADDITION, SUBTRACTION, AND TOTALS: Figures
are entered on keyboard as read. Subtraction is direct.
Sub-totals continuously available. Total appears in the
register, the moment last figure is entered.
MULTIPLICATION: Multiplicand is entered in keyboard.
Actuating bar is depressed for digits in the multiplier.
Product appears in register.
DIVISION: Dividend and divisor are entered in keyboard.
Actuating bar is depressed until it locks, automatically.
Quotient is read from control window, remainder from
register.
DECIMALS: Pointer automatically indicates correct posi-
tion of demical point in division.
CLEARANCE AND CORRECTION: Register is cleared
by depressing clearance key. If wrong figure is entered
it can be canceled by returning red pointer to original

I

;:

Assignments cover the entire spectrum of space,
missile and aircraft technology, including the
following areas:

Heat Transfer --relating to missile
and space vehicle structures .
Servo-Mechanisms -relating to
all types of control problems.
Solid State Physics -relating to
metal surfaces and fatigue
Electronic Systems-relating to all
types of guidance, detection, con-
trol and communications
Environmental -relating to air
conditioning, pressurization and
oxygen systems
Computing -relating to all types
of digital and analog computers
and their utilization

Structures - relating to cyclic
loads, temperature effects, and the
investigation of new materials,
methods, products, etc.
Propulsion -relating to fluid-
mechanics, thermodynamics,
dynamics, internal aerodynamics,
etc.
Aerodynamics - relating to wind
tunnel, research, stability and
control
Space vehicle and weapon sys-
tem studies -of all types, involv-
ing a vast -range of scientific and
'engineering skills

More
than an
Adding
Machine

The above is only a sampling of the opportunities
and fields of interest now open at Douglas
Get full information at

PERSONAL ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
Mo. & Tues. March 16and 17

Mr. C. C. LaVene, staff assistant to wihM.Lentrogyurpa-

with MK. LaVene through your pla6e_

I

lil I MRIig&D~jg" gl"" l-u pp. -S

11

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