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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 15, 1959 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


NoDak Icers Nip
MSU for Title

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone NO 2-4786
from .1:00 to 3 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 9:30'til11:30 A.M.

aI

TROY, N.Y. (JP - Reg MorelliY
grabbed the puck in front of the
net and scored at 4:18 of overtime
last night to win North Dakota its
first NCAA hockey championship,
4-3, over Michigai State.,
Michigan State, trailing 3-1 at
the-end of the second period, pulled
even and sent the game into over-
time- when Jack Roberts snapped
up a rebound and tallied at 16:20
of the third.
A standing-room crowd of more
than 6,000 watched the game in
the Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti-
tute field house.
Earlier yesterday Boston College
"had won the consolation title of
the 12th annual tournament by
edging St. Lawrence, 7-6, in double
.,overtime.
Last night's was the third game
of the four-game tournament to go
into extra play, the first time in
the tournament history there have
beeh three overtime games.,'
North Dakota was runnerup -to
Denver in the 1958 tournament at
Colorado Springs, Colo.
, Michigan State took a 1-0 lead
X 'ast night when Ed Pollesel skated
in and put a shot into the corner
of the net at 14:38 of the first
period.
The Sioux started scoring when
Ralph Lyndon golfed a shot in
from 30 feet at 7:21 of the second.
Within 2, minutes, 17 seconds,
'North Dakota had forged to a 3-1
S3chedUle
To, Favor
By CLIFF MARKS
Michigan's golfers are now prac-
ticing inside in preparation for
4 on,e of the toughest but most at-
tractive schedules in recent years.
The linksmen have four home
7 matches, due to the fact that the
'3ig Ten meet will be played on the
Uiversity course May 22-23 for
rthe first time since 1949.
This unusual schedule . came
about since the other Big Ten
teams want to. play here before
the Conference meet in order to
become more familiar with the
Michigan layout.
Host Nine Teams
The Wolverines play host to
'Illinois and Iowa on May 2, Pur-
due, Ohio State and Nor hwestern
on May 9, Indiana on May 11, and
Wisconsin, Michigan State, and
Detroit on May 16.
Coach Bert Katzenmeyer noted
the quality of the home schedule
by saying, "I feel that the Confer-
ence strength this year lies in Pur-
2 due, Ohio State, and Indiana."
Trip South Planned
" Michigan will open the season
April 2 against North Carolina at
Pinehurst, N. C. The divotdiggers
will be at Pinehurst all of spring
vacation to- sharpen, their games.
Katzenmeyer said that the travel-
ing. squad for the spring trip will
be announced soon.
Katzenmeyer has a nucleus of
four lettermen, all seniors,' to
tackle this rugged sched\le. They
are Captain Ray Lovell, Chuck
Blackett, Pat Keefe, and Larry
Leach.
Junior team members are Dave
Britigan, Larry Markman, Jim
Schmalzreidt, and Larry White,
with sophomores Joe Brissen, John
Everhardus, Gene McAlester, and
Dicik Youngberg rounding out the
balanced 12-man squad,

lead on goals by Jerry Walford and
Stan Paachke.
Andre LaCoste tallied for Mich-
igan State at 8:05 of the third.
The Spartans' goalie, Joe Se-
linger, was sprawled on the ice
when Morelli snapped in his over-
time shot that won the game. I
Morelli was voted the most valu-
able player of the tournament.
In the consolation, Boston Col-
lege defeated St. Lawrence when
Jack Cusack flicked in his second
goal of the game at 6:51 of the
second overtime.
Baseba l
Team Starts
Praetieing
By TOM WITECKI
Bearing the label "under new
management," the 1959 edition of
Michigan's baseball team began
infield practice in Yost Field House
this week in an effort to get in
shape for the comng spring sea-
son.
Taking over the coaching reins
from Ray Fisher, who retired last
spring after 38 years, is Don Lund,
who has spent the 12-odd years or
so since he left the Michigan var-
sity as a player and coach in the
Detroit Tiger organization.
Lund, who described himself as
"a firm believer in physical condi-
tioning," has had his charges run-
ning, throwing and playing "pep-
per" in the confines of old Yost
since mid-January, but it was not
until this week when Bill Perigo
and Co. picked up their floor and
retired. for another winter, that
practice could begin in earnest.
Infield Practice Indoors
Now with a huge screen set up
at one end of the fieldhouse, the
Wolverine infield prospects have
been able to practice daily on a
makeshift diamond.
While this arrangement helps
considerably, Lund is hoping (just
as Fisher used to hope every year)
that Old Man Winter would take
an early exit and give his team a
chance to get outdoors and prac-
tice before its annual spring trip
to the sunny south.
But chances for this pre-trip
outdoor exercise , look especially
dim this year since Easter comes
early on the calendar, putting the
Florida junket just two weeks
away.
'/Cutdown Soon
This year the Wolverines com-
peting in the Florida State Uni-
versity Invitational at Tallahassee
along with Western Michigan, Il-
linois, Michigan State, Duke, North
Carolina, Florida and host Florida
State.
With around 40 players still go-
ing through drills at Yost, Lund
indicated that cutting time is near
since he will be able to take only
"20 or {21" down South.'
An added reason for the cut is
that it will enable Lund and his
new assistant, Moby Benedict, a
chance to work with each player
individually.
Although it is much too early to
really analyze any team accurately,'
it appears that if Lund can find .a
couple of outfielders to fill the
huge gaps left by John Herrn-
stein's pro contract-signing and
Captain Ralph Hutchings' ineligi-
bility, his junior-laden squad may
be able to improve considerably on
last year's 7-8 Big Ten record.

ALTERATIONS
JOHN'S TAILOR SHOP
"The Clothing Stores' Tailor"
Alterations for Men and Women.
Pressing While You Wait
11811 E. Washington NO 2-4617
(above Conlin and Wetherbee
Clothing Store)
)P1
BARGAIN CORNER
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords - $7.25;
socks 39c; shorts, 69c; military sup-
plies. Sam's Store. 122 E. Washington.

IT'S SPRING
SPRING
AND NOW IS THE TIME
TO GET ALL THE
FUN AND ECONOMY
;FROM ONE OF THESE
FINE CARS!
'56 VW
Sedan, tip-top shape.
$1,275
'57 TR-3
Red, wire wheels, sharp.
$1,795
'57 CORVETTE
Completely equipped.
Excellent condition.
$2,475

, '58 TR-3
White, plenty sharp.
$2,245

'58 ALFA
Sprint coupe, demo. Extra nice.
You can save $850 on this
like-new car.
OVERSEAS
AUTO SALES
331 S. Fourth Ave. - NO 2-2541
W32
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
GUY CAR is now accepting applica-
tions in his newest beauty college.
Days, afternoons,and evening classes.
For student beautician. For more in-
formation write or call Ann Arbor
Beauty College, 4567 Washtenaw,
Ypsilanti or NO 5-7500. )CC1
BUSINESS PERSONAL
GUITAR LESSONS:
Guitars, qualified instructor,
Call Maddy Music for details.
NO 3-3395 508 E. Williams
FF6
FOUR pretty formals size 12, $5-$20.
Also cashmere and wool suit, $10, and
other articles. NO 3-0148. FF3
HAVE YOUR SWEATERS knitted espe-
cially for you, designed to fit you ex-
actly. Chhose colors, style. NO 3-9260.
FF1
BUSINESS SERVICES
MAYNARD & SEEGER
WELDERS and
BLACKSMITH I NG
109 S. Ashley
NO 8-7403
J60
HEADQUARTERS for Do-It-Your-
self supplies. Paints, brushes, roll-
ers, wrought iron and wood legs,
Reynolds Aluminum, sheet iron,
threaded rods, spray enamels, etc.
MUEHLIG & LANPHEAR
311 S. Main St.
Phone NO 2-3277
J59
WAKE UP to a breakfast of . . . lox,
creamcheese and bagels, onion rolls,
and assorted danish pastry. Also while
thinking of food,think of the rest of
the week and purchase your delicious
foods at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 2-3175
J59
RITZ
BEAUTY SALON
Complete ine of Beauty work
605 E. Williams
Phone NO 8-7066
J5
TYPING: Thesis, Term papers, reason-
able rates. Prompt service. NO 8-7590.
J42
LADES BARBER SHOP
11081 S. University
Only barber in town who is a
trained and licensed Ladies' Hair
Stylist. J17
Eddie's Paint Store
White paint ..".... $1.98 per gal.
Colors ................ $2.48 per gal.
117 E. Ann NO 8-6966
)J15
TYPING-NO 5-3511, evenings or ma-
terials accepted 12 noon at U High
office. Gladys Smith. J4
ON-DAY SERVICE
and COMPLETE SERVICE at
SANFORD'S
Shoe Repairing - Hat Cleaning
Tailoring - Pressing
Shoe Shining
119 East Ann street
(oppositetcourt house)
NO 8-6966
J2
.AER no DT Em and. Tvn , On,4

AT NCAA SWIM 'REUNION':
Old Hungarian Rivals
To Meet Again Soon

By DICK MINTZ
A swim rivalry, interrupted by
revolutionary turmoil, will be re-
sumed at the end of the month
when Michigan's John Urbancsok
meets Yale's Balazs Gorfy at the
NCAA Swim Championships in
Ithaca, N.Y.
The two Hungarian-born ath-
letes haven't seen each other since
competing in the Hungarian Jr.
National Swim Championships
held in Budapest only three days
before the 1956 revolution there.
Swim Equal Times
Fleeing Hungary, the two have
since established thgemselves as
outstanding distance competitors
in this country. Gorfy recently de-
throned Fordham's Drury Galla-
gher for the Eastern Swim Cham-
-pionships 1,500 - meter freestyle
crown while Urbanscok gained
fourth in the hotly-contested Big
Ten event. The two had equal tim-
ings, though, of 18:45.
"The greatest distance race we

morning so that I could be in the
municipal pool at 6 for my morn-
ing workout," he said. "There was
only one indoor pool in thbe city
and it was crowded in the after-
noon by club swimmers." My own
club, which is probably now gov-
ernment-subsidized, was the larg-
est in the city, and so we'd have a
two hour reserved period in the
evening when I continued practice.
"What American swimmer or
coach would be willing to get up
and practice at 5 a.m.?" Urbanc-
sok asked.
Coach Gus Stager, a strong ad-
vocate of mid-afternoon practice
in the roomy Varsity Pool, could
hardly see the need for break-of-
day practice at Michigan.
. Gruelling Routine
Urbancsok certainly does enough
swimming as a late riser now. The
well - built distance man swims
three to four miles daily. Part of
his practice consists of swimming
intervals of ten 440-yd. freestyle

F fA nv"db1] fAT9tb tart nmcP_ nn ripe t from the, Start.

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