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March 14, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-14

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SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1959 THE MTCHJEA1~T DAILY PA (F~

Judie Finds
Fraternity
In Violation
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
is a statement from Joint Judiciaty
Council concerning disciplinary ac-
tion taken in connection with the
fraternity's violation of University
regulations.)
"Robert Weinbaum, '59L, Pres-
ident, and Hilary Snell, '59L, Im-
mediate Past President of Kent
Inn Chapter of Phi Delta Phi
Fraternity appeared before the
Joint Judiciary Council concern-
ing an incident which occurred on
the evening of February 7, 1959.
"The Council, from the testi-
mony given, determined that Phi
j Delta Phi fraternity was guilty of
conduct unbecoming a student
group in that the University regu-
lationsconcerning drinking in a
fraternity house were violated
and an unregistered party was
held.
"The Council recommended to
the University Sub-Committee on
Discipline that a fine of $250.00
be imposed and that Phi Delta Phi
fraternity be warned that any fu-
ture violation will lead to the im-
position of more severe penalties.
"The Sub-Committee approved
the Council'shrecommendation.
Phi Delta Phi's, national and
alumni offices -were also informed
of the action."
Dental School
Presents Ball
From 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. tonight
the School of Dentistry will pre-
sent its twenty-fifth annual Odon-
to Ball 4n, the Union ballroom.
The formal dance will feature
the Johnny Harberd Orchestra
and intermission entertainment by
the junior class, a movie depicting
joys of life in dental school, ac-
cording to Stu Smith, '60D, pub-
licity chairman.
The junior dental hygienists will
also furnish intermission enter-
tainment.
Refreshments will be served
during the ,lance, whose theme is
its silver anniversary, and all
' ladies present will be given white
carnation corsages.
The annual affair will be at-j
tended by dental students, facul-
ty and alumni. In keeping with
} its silver anniversary theme, spe-
cial invitations have been extend-
ed to the class of '36.

NO 'TORTURE CHAMBER':
Tester Conducts Informal Exams

University Enters National
Postal Bridge Tournament

PALEONTOLOGIST-The late Raydnond R. Hibbard, whose pri-
vate fossil collection has been purchased by the University Museum
of Paleontology, spent much time in the careful and delicate
preparation of microscopic slides.
Museum Shows Fossils
From Paleozioc Period

n

By SHARON EDWARDS
Late last summer the Univer-
sity Museum of Paleontology ac-
quired the Raymond R. Hibbard
fossil collection.
The extensive collection con-
sists principally of three kinds of
Paleozoic fossils: bryozoa, cono-
donts and scolecodonts, Prof.
Lewis B. Kellum, Museum direc-
tor, said.
Bryozoa are minute colonial
aquatic animals, he explained, in
which each species has a compley,
skeleton characteristic of the spe-
cies both in internal structure and
in external form. This is the larg-
est private collection of bryozoa
in the world, he pointed out. It
includes whole fossils, thin sec-
tions of fossils mounted on micro-
scope .slides and enlarged photo-
graphs.
Known Only as Fossils
Conodonts are minute problem-
atical structures known only from
ancient rocks, Prof. Kellum said,
and believed to be the gill rakes
or mouth parts of otherwise un-
known fish. Scolecodonts, he con-
tinued, are the so-called "jaws" of
a group of marine worms which
are still extant.
The Hibbard collection contains
millions of specimens of these two
kinds of fossils. The basic classi-
fication of conodonts was made
possible originally by a rich source
of these fossils discovered by the
late Dr. Hibbard.

The collection also contains
many minor sub-collections of
other kinds of fossils. In addition,
the Museum of Paleontology ac-
quired the entire Hibbard library
dealing with these fossils, there-
by obtaining almost everything
ever published on the topic, Prof.
Kellum pointed out. The library
is very highly specialized, he add-
ed, and contains many rare items.
Largest Group Extant
The collection was purchased,
he said, because it was the best
and largest in existence. He said
he hoped the collection will at-
tract future students engaged in
research on this topic. It is of
particular interest, Prof. Kellum
remarked, since it includes much
material from Michigan and the
surrounding Great Lakes area.
The late Dr. Hibbard was a re-
search collaborator at the Univer-
sity Museum of Paleontology. Al-
though he held this title for less
than a year before his death in
1957, Prof. Kellum said,' he had
actually been contributing to the
Museum's collections since 1927.
In the earlier part of his life,
spent as an optician, he developed
a skill, Prof. Kellum commented,
that prepared him for the work of
mounting specimens on micro-
scope slides in such a way that
all the delicate internal structures
would be clearly visible.
At one time, he said, the United
States National Museum entrust-
ed Hibbard with the remounting
of a great part of their bryozoa
collection.
His private collection, contain-
ing only his most perfect speci-
mens, was purchased from Hib-
bard's widow with University
funds, matched by funds from the
National Science Foundation.
- .
My
BOSS
said
Vote for
CAROL SHAPIRO
for L.S.A. Secretary

By CAROL LEVENTEN
In a room strewn with old blue-
books a student sat in a creaking
rocking chair, lackadaisically
glancing over some apparently
unimportant papers.
He might have been waiting for
a friend, but he was waiting to
take his doctorate language exam-
committee selected me by process
informal testing circumstances at
the University. People troop in
and out, joking with the tester,
and give the general impression
that this is some sort of group
coffee hour.
Although the office is called the
"Torture Chamber of Rackham,"
the whole effect - including Prof.
Hirsch Hootkins, who gives the
tests - is anything but torturous.
Notes 'Monotony'
"It gets pretty monotonous to
keep passing people. I hope you're
the last," he complained to the
day's last candidate -his 606th
this year. "I'm afraid they'll think
I'm getting senile downstairs," he
said.
Despite the large number of
candidates, Hootkins only spends
three-fourths of his time giving
them exams: he also teaches a
Spanish course. "Boy, have I been
hit on the head today," he
laughed. "They tell you that after
a professor teaches his class, 'he
ain't got nothin' more to do.' He
should come in here some day."
Although one candidate, grin-
ningly said the exam was "really
easy," Hootkins explained that
many students do get nervous.
"I've had women faint on me,
break into tears; one even lost
her voice when she tried to read
her translation." he exclaimed.
Only Two Flunked
In an ominous looking ante-
room students translate - with
the help of a dictionary - a pas-
sage selected by the examiner. He
provides the bluebooks and lis-
tens while they read aloud, often
interrupting with jokes, anecdotes
and snatches of philosophizing.
"I've only flunked two students
out of 104 this semester," he re-
vealed.
Inevitably,dthere's an audience
of other candidates, some surpris-'
ingly morose. The door is left
open to increase the fun of "tor-
turing" students in public.
Proficient in 12 languages,
Hootkins gives exams in all of
them. He said there has been an
increase in doctoral candidates

which accounts for the fact that
he's given over 20,000 exams in 11
years.
Counsels Students
Hootkins considers his office a
place where troubled grad stu-
dents can "come to talk over their
language problems." He said he
sees himself as a friend, not mere-
ly a test-giver. "It's all in your at-
titude," he decided.
"I like these young men and
women and like what they're do-
ing. They like me because they
County Pieks
Show Head
Prof. Henry J. Gomberg, chair-
man of the nuclear engineering
department and assistant director
of the Michigan Memorial-
Phoenix Project, has been ap-
pointed director of the Washtenaw
County Science Fair.
Scheduled 'for April 11 'in the
Waterman Gymnasium, juniior
and senior high school students
from the county will display sci-
ence exhibits which they have
conceived and constructed.
Sponsored in part by the Uni-
versity, the fair will award an ex-
pense-paid trip to the National
Science Fair in Hartford, Con-
necticut for the best exhibit in the
senior division.
The exhibits, which may be in
any scientific field, will be judged
on the basis of originality, scien-
tific thought, completeness, accu-
racy, workmanship, clarity and
dramatic value.
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know I'm a friend of theirs. I
think that some of them probably
have better brains than mine,
some equal and some not so equal
but I treat them as men and wo-
men, not children."
The language tests are easy,
one student explained, because
candidates are allowed to choose
their own boks. Often, he con-
tinued, students will bring a new
book, bent back at a certain page,
so that Hootkins, if all goes well,
will open it at that place.
Another trick is to bring one
short book "which you Practically
memorize" he revealed. The re-
quirement states that students
must pass exams in two languages.
Appointment a 'Shock'
"I don't know how I got into
this," Hootkins continued. "It was
a complete shock to me and to ev-
eryone else on campus. My prede-
cessor had a heart attack and a
ination under probably the most
of elimination."
He will retire in June, and plans
to tour Europe with his wife. "We
take life pretty much as a joke,"
he said, in the middle of a stu-
dent's reading of a treatise on
alpha rays. "We figure that
money's for spending, so we're
just going to travel, and maybe
I'll learn some new languages."

The University's session of theV
1959 Intercollegiate Bridge Tour-
nament will be held from 2 to 5
p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 3D of the
Union.
The University is one of approx-
imately 180 colleges and universi-
ties participating in this postal
duplicate bridge tournament, Mrs.
Walter McLean, who will direct
the tournament, said.
Eighteen specially prepared deals
from the national committee head-
quarters will test the efforts of
pairs of bridge players. They will
record every card they play, and
these records will be sent back to
committee headquarters to be
scored by Goeffrey Mott-Smith.
Smith, an author and contract
bridge authority, will determine
campus, regional and national
winners.
To Award Trophies
Prizes will include trophy cups
for the colleges winning the na-
tional titles, one cup for the col-
lege of the pair scoring highest on
the East-West hands and one cup
for the college of the North-South
hand winners.
Each of the four individual na-
tional winners will receive a small-
er cup for his permanent posses-
sion.

Mrs. McLean explained that the
players' ability to use such tech-
niques as squeeze and percentage
plays would be challenged.
To Use Tourney Rules
The session will use tournament
rules, where the entrants' ability to
bid and make contracts will be
compared with those of partici-
pants throughout the nation.
Last year, more than 1,478 stu-
dents in 45 states participated in
the tournament. Teams represent-
ing Iowa State and Cornell Univer-
sities won the national champion-
ship titles and trophy cups. More
than 100 other students won re-
gional and campus honors.
All individual campus tourna-
ments will be held between March
13 through March 25. The ap-
proval of the dean or other ad-
ministrative official must be grant-
ed before a college can be regarded
as officially entered in the tourna-.
ment.
The national committee is a part
of the Games Committee, associa-
tion of College Unions.
The committee, Mrs. McLean
said, is interested in developing
contract bridge as an interesting
supplement to the collegiate social
program.

I A iE To'CHlURCH~

ON

,HE

\SAB BrATH

Director Sees War Deterrent
I Ad t m n Defe nse

By KENNETH McELDOWNEY
In the dedication of) the new
Civil Defense and Disaster Center
on North Campus Thursday,
Frank Starr, regional civil de-
fense director said that adequate
civil defense woul dserve to deter
a; future war.
Ralph Sheehan, Michigan di-
rector of civil defense, said that
the' Center will help solve one of
the basic needs of civil defense,
that of organizing leadership.
Here people can be trained and
return to their 'local communities
to provide the type of leadership
that is desperately needed, he
added.
Harold Dorr, dean of state-wide
education introduced the speakers
who spok before the gathering of
University, local, state and federal
officials. He announced that Gov.
G. Mennen Williams who was ori-
ginally scheduled to speak was
unable to attend due to the state's
financial problems being discussed
in Lansing.
Warns of Danger
In a short talk, President Har-
lan Hatcher said that though
Americans are peace-loving we
must realize that we are living
in a period of potential danger.
He added that the Center is dedi-
cated to the training of citizens,
but in hopes that the training hat
is received here will never need to
be used in an actual situation.
Everett Soop, director of the
University Extension Service also
stressed this point in his speech.
At a luncheon held . at the
Union, Lewis Berry, assistant di-.
rector of the Office of Civil and
Defense Mobilization, spoke on
the overall roll of civil defense. He
stressed the fact that civil de-
fense's role is so large today that
the military or police and fire de-
partments would not be able to
handle it.
Duties Overlapped
Before the Office of Defense
Mobilization and the Federal Civil
Defense Administration were com-
bined, he explained, many of their
duites and roles overlapped. ODM,
Bridge !

he continued, was responsible for
preparin gthe economy for attack
r and rehabilitating it in event of
an attack.
FCDA, on the other hand,
worked on plans for readiness and
survival, he said.
Berry said in view of the over-
lapping and duties and President
Dwight D. Eisenhower's desire to
have direct responsibility over
FCDA, as he did with ODM, it was
decided to combine the two of-
fices.
Groups Merge
s The new organization, the Of-
fice of Civil and Defense Mobili-
zation, is part of the Office of the
President.
The change, which took place
last year, was the beginning of a
large reorganization which has
involved many moves of personnel
from one location to another, Ber-
ry noted.
Many important things hap-
pened last year, he noted, even
though there was a certain
amount of confusion. A national
plan outlining the duties and re-
sponsibilities as well as the courses
for states and communities was
released. Berry said that this plan
will have many far reaching as-
pects. He added it was a large
step toward non-military defense.
Tour Facilities
The 'dedication program began
with informal tours through the
Center's facilities. In the main
building are housed the living
units, class rooms, lecture hall and
garage. Just outside the main,
building is the practice fire tower
which will be used to practice
types of rescue operations.
About one mile from the living
unit are other facilities to be used
for training. These include a con-
crete and cement block house
where various rescue operations
can be simulated. Next to the
building are shells of rooms in
which rescue operations can be
practiced on dummies buried un-
der piles of rubble.
Also in the area are vats to be
used for practice in extinguishing
oil and gasoline fires.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY-
9:00 A.M. Worship Service.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service-Communion.
7:00 P.M. "Modern Christian Architecture
and Symbolism," Prof. Ralph Hammett.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 A.M. Holy Communion.
7:15 P.M. Lenten Service.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
"It's Me, 0 Lord," Dr. Fred E. Luchs preaching.
Services: 9:30-10:20 and 11:00-12:00.
"The Last Supper," Bible Lecture by Mrs. Luchs,
10:20-10:40.
Church School: 9:30-10:40 and 10:55-12:00,
ages crib through 9th Grade.
Student Guild 7:00 Memorial Christian Church,
"The Conflict Between Science and Religion"
by Dr. Lawrence Brockway of the Chemistry Dept.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Church School. Adult Group--"The
Place of Religion in Japanese Life Today,"
Dr. John B. Cornell.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon, "Precepts
and Practices."
7:00 P.M. Student Group, Joann Bleche and
Pauline Streets, "The Bahai Faith." Transpor-
tation furnished.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Hoover Rupert, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Minist'ers
9:00 and 10:00,A.M. Worship: "The Glow of
Radiant Living."
9:30-10:30 A.M. Discussion Group: "Paradoxes
of the Christian Faith."
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 P.M. Worship and Program. Speaker: Mr.
Randy Rice, "The Trinity."
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
Robert Baker, Assistant
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 12:00. Dr. Kul-
zenga preaching.
10:30 A.M. Seminar, "Barriers to Belief."
1 1:30 A.M. Coffee Hour.
5:30 P.M. Student supper.
7:00 P.M. Worship and program. Installa-
tion of new officers.
TUESDAY-
9:30 P.M. Coffee Hour at Pat Pickett's
apartment, 217 S. Observatory.
WEDNESDAY-
4:15 P.M. UCF Midweek worship at the
Congregational Chapel.
7:30 P.M. Midweek Lenten Worship.
FR IDAY-
6:00 P.M. Graduate supper and program.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 and 11:30 Meeting for worship..
10:00'Sunday school and college discussion.
11:30 Adult discussion.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND THE
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
students, followed by breakfast and discuss
in Canterbury House~
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
5:00 P.M. Canterbury Buffet Supper
5:30 P.M. Lenten Program
7:00 P.Myi. Evening Prayer
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11 :00 A.M. "Substance."
A free reading room is maintained at 339
Main Street. Reading room hours are Mro
11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M., Tuesday thrct
Friday 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Satur
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

E
for
ions4
So.
iday
ugh
rday

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theo. A. Kriefall, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Worship Services, with
sermon by the Vicar, "By Faith, Yet By
Works."
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Talk by the Rev.
Calvin Fiege of Detroit, Stewardship Counselor
for the Michigan District.
Tuesday at 6:00: Married Students' Potluck Sup-
per. Phone NO 3-5560 for reservations or
information.
Wednesday at 7:30: Lenten Vesper Service.

r
r
t
j
t
F

._..

KfL KROSSWORD

No. 17

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
Morning Warship: 10:45 A.M. Sermon topic: "The
Christian News: The Fatherhood of God, Rev.
Russell Fuller.
The Student Guild will hearDr. L. Brockway: "The
Conflict Between Science and Religion," 7:00
P.M.

1:

2

ACROSS
1. Between a hop
and a jump
5. Animal from
Green Bay?
9. Wall encountered
on some dates
10. Miss Gardner
ad infinitum
11. They attract
eyes
12. Kind of stand
13. It follows you
down South
14. Don't get
caught in it
15. Gal who looks
like unmade bed
17. Marilyn's one
18. Kind of do
21. Half a song
at Yale
22. This makes
a profound
impression
25. With lemon
in your mouth
26. All you need
to get ahead
27. Paint _.
28. Snick and -
29. Tackle's rainy-
day facial
30. Chow
34. Kind of etera
35. Biblical birth
reference
87. She sounds
like money
38. Instrument of
the conniver
40. Temple, but far

2. Are you
smoking 'em?
Good!
8. You're brave
if you're
using this
4. Pets
in confusion
5. Manhandle
6. Ile gets
the air
7. Meow from
girl on phone?
S. A good place
for "hots"
9. Rock popular
in Ireland
16. Early morning
cut
17. Overimbiber
19. It's good in.
the hole
20. What Pop
saw in
Clara Bow
21. Crosby cat
22. Gnatty crowd
23. Kools' mild
refreshing
ingredient
24. Right on
target
25. Drink not
favored by
1? Down
27. Pavored
receptacle
of17 Down
29. Pinochle
or gin
maneuvers
31. Dress up
32. Something to

3

4

7A
E
1(

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RE YOU KODL r.2
NOUGH TO 10
RACK THIS?"
og 12

6

7

8s

11i
'13
15 16
18 1,20
22 23- 24
2b
28 29
34 35-
38 39
42
44

II-I -

14

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service.
6:30 P.M. Worship Service.

1
i

i i

--i f--i. ----

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 and 11:00 A.M. "The Unity of the Church."
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild and Youth Group.
7:00 P.M. "God's Infinite Wisdom."
Wednesday-7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!

37

e {

d0

._..

141

43
45

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship Service: "Washing
the Disciples' Feet."
7:00 P.M. Evening Worship Service: "The Word
of the Cross."

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5
F
1
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R

from Philly live for
42. Flipped 83.lAueous
43. Horse & soap... . Aqsoluos
44. Rains marbles 35. Favorite SWTC14 FFOM TO
45. But she vegetable
,may not be of this
a cheap date generation?'
36. The first man ,o
DOWN to break it wins
1. Got beyond $9. Point in$
first base, compasses
illicitly 44. Short general
* * * KCD

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh D.
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs. Gabrielle Bublitz, Assistant Student
Counsellor
Chtrch Services at 9 and 11 A.M. Mr. Picket
preaching on: "The Kingdom and the Power."
Student Bible Class at 9:50 A.M.: Study of the
Book of Hebrews.
Studenprt Fellowshiomeet at 6:4 P.M. at Guild

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service.

Sup plies

11

11

I II

11 '"

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