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February 10, 1959 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, FEBRUARY
TREND TO CONTINUE IN 1959:
Claims Communist Movement Losing Ground

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press Foreign News Analyst
Communism as a world revolu-
tionary movement lost some
ground in 1958.
Indications are that the trend
will continue in 1959. If this hap-
pens, the coming year can bring
the world closer to total war than
at any time since the guns fell si-
lent in 1945.
Although chances are that the
decade of the "Fearful Fifties" will
pass into history without plunging
civilization over the precipice,
there will be no real peace.
The most nervous moments are
likely to come in May. That is the
Kremlin's deadline for forcing the
West to deal with the East Ger-
man Communist regime. A great
power summit meeting is a distinct
possibility thereafter. Although it
would be unlikely to settle any ma-
jor problems it could give the
world a breathing spell.
Aggressive Look
Rising Soviet military power
combined with the nakedly aggres-
sive look of its world political
drive has caused serious second
thoughts in the ranks of those
national leaders whp apparently
believed Communism could be used
as a political ally and still be kept
at arm's length.
These measures include the
manufacture of artificial but dan-
gerous crises wherever the Com-
munist leadership may find this
necessary. Here is a brief look at
potential trouble areas in 1959:
THE COMMUNIST BLOC
Soviet Premier Nikita Khrush-
chev's high command in- some
respects is in an unpleasant posi-
tion. Undertaking a super-ambi-
tious seven-year plan to overtake
the United States economically, it
must continue to hold-down on
consumer production. Premier
Khrushchev probably will . be
obliged to restore some degiree of
Stalinism, even though he might
wish to keep up the appearance
of relaxation. The Soviet public is
becoming more and more demand-
ing. .
Soviet policy thus is likely to
lean heavily upon crisis tactics to
piovide both excuse and goad for
the drive to massive economic
power.
Similar considerations to an
even more marked degree impel
Red China to employ crisis tac-
tics.
Crisis Ready
The U.S.S.R. and Red China
have ready-made crisis conditions
at their disposal whenever they
choose to turn the spigot. Mos-
cow has divided Germany. It has
only to bring pressure to create a
major crisis. Peiping has the For-
mosa Strait. It can create a crisis
by warlike thrusts, or ease'a cri-
sis simply by silencing the guns.
Also at the disposal of Peiping

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AP dewsfeatures
are Asian satellite troops in North
Korea and Viet Nam, cold battle-
grounds that could be made hot
again at. any time.
Both big Communist powers are
plagued by what they call revi-
sionism, which in essence means
independent Communist thought
or action. It is growing, inspired
by the example of Marshal Tito
of Yugoslavia. Soviet and Red
Chinese rulers found experiments
with independent thpught to be
dangerous. Communism requires
total, unquestioning obedience.
Tito will loom importantly in the
year's political and propaganda
wars.
EUROPE
A war situation is inherent in
the Berlin crisis. Khrushchev's in-
tention may be to force a meeting
at the summit, to capture the
world's undivided attention while
Communism prepares aggressive
maneuvers elsewhere.
MIDDLE EAST
A likely theater for such maneu-
vers will be the Middle East.
Moscow already is applying
pressure upon Iran to frighten the
country out of a protective alli-
ance with the West.
The Kremlin will watch from
the wings the unfolding drama
of the Arab East. Most dangerous
spots will be the psychotic little
kingdom of Jordan and the revo-
lutionary new republic of Iraq. If
King Hussein of Jordan falls be-
fore the pressure of Egyptian-led
extreme nationalism, a Middle
East explosion is a probability. A
defensive move by Israel in Jor-
dan's direction could throw the
whole Arab East into warlike tur-

Ked Pressure roints
Western Resistance
Communist Bloc

moil and imperil the flow of the
oil which Europe's economy needs.
Gamal Abdel Nasser, ruler of the
United Arab Republic of Egypt
and Syria, will continue to be a
source of worry to the West as he
falls more and more into political
and economic involvement with
the Red block But 1959 is likely to
see a noticeable decline of Nas-
ser's powerful influence in the
Middle East and Africa.
AFRICA
There seems little hope for set-
tling North Africa's most vexing
problem, Algeria. The turbulent
North African situation is becom-
ing, even more complicated in the
clash between Egypt's Nasser and
Presidenit Habib Bourguiba of Tu-
nisia, clearly etching the grim
conflict in the whole Arab World
between pro-Western and anti-
Western forces.
In black Africa, countries emerg-
ing from colonial status to na-
tionhood are eager for sympa-
thetic help from the United States.
The Communists will make deter-
mined efforts to muddy the
waters. They will have some as-
sistance, however unwitti g, from
the avid pan-Islam by which Nas-
ser hopes to extend his influence
ORCH EST A
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A Campus-to-Career Case History

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Bill Burns (far right) reviews a plan for expanding Syracuse's
toll-free calling area with some fellow supervisors.

He wanted more than
"just an engineering job"

William G. Burns majored in Civil En-
gineering at Union College. But he had
his own ideas about his engineering
future. "I wanted a job with a 'growth'
company," he says, "where I could de-
velop and move ahead as a member of
management."
Bill found his 'growth' company-and
his management opportunity. On gradu-
ating in June, 1954, he started work
with the New York Telephone Company.
Six months of training and job assign-
ments in Albany familiarized him with
the Plant, Commercial, Accounting and
Traffic functions of the telephone busi-
ness. Then came 18 months as engineer
in the Long Range Planning Group. In
flrfr-r 196 .h was nrnrmoted in i-u

August, 1958, as Supervising Engineer--
Fundamental Plans, with a staff of four
engineers and two clerks. In this job,
he studies and forecasts the future tele-
phone needs of customers in a 4800-
square-mile area, planning from three to
20 years ahead. He then co-ordinates
the development of plans to meet future
needs with the various engineering
groups involved. Bill calls it "manage-
ment engineering."
Bill is, married, has three youngsters
and owns his own home. "A man has to
build his own security," he says, "and
finding the right place to do it can be
mighty important. Choosing a Bell Tele-
phone career was the best decision I ever
made I don't know where an ambitious

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