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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 07, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
GENERAL LIBRARY:
Rare Books Date
Back 450 Years'

u 4

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The followingv
story is the first in a series of three
which will both describe the Rare
Book Room of the General Library
and examine the subject of the rare
books in general.)
By PHILIP SHERMAN
Tucked in the back of the Gen-
eral Library's stack is an import-
ant but little-known part of the
University Library system.
The Rare Book Room containsk
about 48,000 books, all of whichI
are considered to be of such spe-
cial value as to be specially cared
for, Miss Ella M. Hymans, rare
book librarian, said.
The oldest printed piece in the
collection is a leaf from the Gut-
enberg Bible, the first printed
book. It contains a chapter from
Isaiah.
Printed Before 1500
Almost four hundred other
books are classified as incuna-
bula, books "from the cradle"
printed before 1500.
Although the Rare Book Room
contains a varied collection, hav-
ing works in all fields, its primary
emphasis is English literature;
The collection ranges from
Shakespeare to e. e. cummings,
she added.
Miss Hymans, explaining why
such rare books are valuable to
the library, said they must be
"desirable, important and hard to
come by." Rare books are desir-
able in the sense that a library
can fit them into its collection,
she added.
Contains Early Books
Miss Hymans cited the example
of the 'Imaginary Voyage Collec-
tion," a special collection contain-
ing early and new editions of,
books such as "Robinson Crusoe"
and "Gulliver's Travels." To the
University Library a copy of
"Robinson Crusoe" printed in
German in the eighteenth cen-
tury, would be desirable as it
would augment the existing col-
lection. To another library, which
had no "Robinson Crusoe" col-
lection, it would have small value,
only as a curiosity piece, she con-
tinued.
In speaking of the monetary
values of rare books both Miss
Hymans and Prof. Frederick H.
Wagman, director of the Univer-
sity Library, emphasized the im-
portance of supply and demand.I

The rare book market behaves
as does any other, they said, sub-
ject to the whims of consumers
and the desires of dealers to sell.
Prof. Wagman declared schol-
arship is, of course, the main rea-
son for having any books and rare
books are no exception. Scholars
can analyze the various editions
of rare books when studying a
particular author in order to as-
certain his exact words or mean-
ing.
This is also important for mu-
sicians, Prof. Wagman pointed
out, who frequently find it neces-
sary to go back to the composer's
manuscript scores.
Some Never Reprinted
Some rare boobs have never
been reprinted and therefore are
the only copies available to schol-
ars.
, An examination of a rare old
book also gives a "tremendous ex-
perience" and a "sense of history"
to the examiner, she added.
Among other scholarly uses, rare
books may be important in the
history of printing.
The Library has a large collec-
tion of Elzevier books, editions of
a famous seventeenth century
Dutch printing firm which was
outstanding in its typography and
binding, Miss Hymans said.
Use Special Care
In the General Library, these
rare books are specially cared for.
Miss Hymans said her principal
job is supervising the Rare Book
Room and caring for the books.
Now the books are available on
the fourth level south, but part
of the collection is being moved
to new quarters on the floor be-
low.j
All of the books are kept under
lock and key, due to their value
and difficulty of replacement, but
are available to all users.
Reading Done in Room
The collection is non-circulat-
ing. All reading must be done in
the Rare Book Room, she added.
The entire area is specially fire-
proofed, the present room having
been built in the manner of a
bank vault, combination-lock door
included.
No more care is needed than in
reading regular books, though,
Miss Hymans emphasized, users
must be extremely gentle.

GIRLS ON ICE-Here in the one of their formations, that of the famous "M," the Ann Arbor
Hockettes perform as they have before four of the University's home hockey games this year. Of
the 24 local girls, 10 are daughters of University professors. All of the performers are currently
going to local high schools.
Hockettes Perform at Coliseum,

" 1

University hockey fans who
reached their seats by 7:30 p.m.
preceding four of the home games
tis year might have been sur-
prised to find themselves viewing
a chorus of 24 teen-aged figure
skaters, the Hockettes.
Wearing navy blue' skating
dresses with gold M's emblazoned
on the front, these girls, 10 of
whom are University professors'
,daughters, skate to football
marches as well as to skaters'
waltzes. .
When the chorus originated last
year in the Ann Arbor Figure
Skating Club, it consisted of a
group of girls who skated as a

unit in the club's 16th annual ice
show, "Melody on Ice."
Their performance before two
of last year's home hockey games
marked the first time in the Uni-
versity's history that such a con-
centration of feminine pulchri-
tude had "broken the ice" for
the hockey players.
This year, with four members
at college, the local club held try-
outs to fill the vacancies. Aside,
from being a member of the club,
aspirants must pass the prelim-
inary figure skating test and be in
the ninth grade or higher. About
15 hopefuls went through their.

paces before the panel of three
judges, executing such maneuvers
as the Mohawk, three turn, front
and back edges and the hop 14.
Almost half of the girls in the
Hockettes have been members of
the local United States Figure
Skating Association sanctioned
club since they were seven or
eight years old, many having
performed solos in ice shows.
-The Hockettes, whose average
age is 16, will appear in the 17th
annual "Melody on Ice" next Sat-
urday and Sunday at the Univer-
sity Ice Rink.

Fraternity
To Present
Music Show
Alpha Chapter of Sigma Alpha
Iota, national honorary music
fraternity, will present its an-
nual American Musicale at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow in Aud. A, Angell
Hall.
The program will open with
"Soliloquy" by Bernard Rodgers
played by Sandra Mount, '61SM,
flute, and Diana Baird, '61, piano.
"Sonata for Violin andPiano" by
Aaron Copland will be played next
by JoAnne Bath, Grad., violin,
and Charles Bath, Grad., piano.,
Janet Ruffner, Grad., oboe and
Martha Rearick, '60SM, piano,
will then present "Suite for Oboe
and Piano" by Walter Piston.
Four pieces arranged by Flor-
ian Mueller will then be per-
formed by a Woodwind Quintet
consisting of Jo Louise Bradley,
'59M, flute, Betty Bird, Grad.,
bassoon, Karl Glenn, Grad.,
French horn, Kay LaDouceur,
'598M, oboe, and Robert Woiciak,
Grad., clarinet.
The program will conclude with
a discussion of "American Opera"
by Don Gillis, currently the di-
rector of - development of the
American Opera Workshop at the
National Music Camp.
To diseuss
Family Lie
The problems of in-law rela-
tionships will be discussed at 8:30
a.m. today on the University tele-
vision series,, "Marriage," on
WXYZ-TV (Ch. 7, Detroit),
Evelyn M. Duvall, who will
speak on family life, found in a
nationwide survey among family
organizations, the mother-in-law
relationship was considered the
most difficult.
However, Mrs. Duvall said all
in-law troubles tended to mellow
with age and experience, and a
mother-in-law generally graduat-
ed to the good fairy role of a
grandmother.
Younger marriages today seem
to be having a beneficial effect on
the relations between generations,
Mrs. Duvall commented, as great-
er dependency on in-laws for 8
nancial assistance, baby sitting
and other forms of cooperation
occur.
DIAL NO 2-3136
ENDING TODAY
LATE SHOW
TONIGHT 11 P.M.
SCHELL-MALDEN.
TEMHNICOLOR* ioM WARNER BROS.
SUNDAY
"The Sheriff
OF
Fractured Jaw"

I

14

COLLEGE ROUNDUP

By RUTHANN RECHT +
IOWA CITY-An amendment to
the State University of Iowa Stu-
dent Council Constitution which
will make the student body presi-1
dent popularly elected was passed;
recently. This snew amendment
provides that the office will be+
filled by a popular student vote
on three candidates chosen by a
nominating committee made up
of Student Council members.
* * *
MADISON - The Associated
Women's Congress of the Univer-
sity of. Wisconsin ", recently ap-
proved the Coed's Congress. This
legislative branch of the AWS
which replaces the House Presi-

SEE IT!
pt
presented
by
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
on MARCH 5, 6, 7, at 8:00
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
LAST PLAY OF THE SEASON-
"SEE YOU AT THE LEAGUE"

Give Late Per
For IHC Show
A late permission of 1:30 a.m.
has been scheduled for Saturday,
March 14, according to Paul Lich-
ter, '60, Student Government
Council Calendaring Committee
chairman.,
The permission ."was approved
for the Inter-House Council-
Assembly Association Spring
Show, the Odonto Ball and a per-
formance of the Gilbert and Sul-
livan Society presentation.
Due to the change in women's
residence hall closing hours this
semester, the 1:30 a.m. permission
is not listed on activities calen-
dars.

dent's Council will represent
Madison girls for the first time.
* * *
MINNEAPOLIS - Erected as a
tribute to University of Minnesota
students who served in the Span-
ish American War, is a statue of
of the "Hiker," the typical foot-
soldier of the day. But now he
stands in front of the Armory
with his tin cup missing from his
hand. The University is trying to
catch the thief.
EAST LANSING - President
Hannah of Michigan State Uni-
versity aired views on students'
gripes last week. Shoving micro-
phones aside, Hannah battled it
out verbally with students in
what was planned as a radio
program.
On the topic of drinking, he
said he was not concerned with
"anyone who has liquor or beer
in his apartment quietly," but
Ask Opinions
On Schedule
4Students who wish to discuss
any possible schedule changes with
the University Calendar. Study
Committee shouldecall Allan Still-
wagon, '59, student member of
the committee, he said yesterday.
A meeting will be scheduled soon
for those who have called and ex-
pressed opinions, Stillwagon said.
Organization
Notces
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, serv-
ices at 10 a.m. Elementary Hebrew
Class at 7 p.m., Advanced Hebrew Class
at 7:30 p.m., March 7, 1429 Hill St.
Int'l Students Assoc., ISA-League
Social, March 7, 9-12 p.m., League
Snack-Bar.

with the stipulation that he should
be of legal age and not on cam-
pus. "I am concerned with boys
and girls getting together with
liquor. This results in unfavor-
able publicity from newspapers
which the university has an obli-
gation to prevent."
ITHACA - Safeguards were
adopted by the Committee on Re-
organization of Student Govern-
ment at Cornell University
Monday night, to protect the stu-
dent body from possible abuses
by the nominating committee and
to prevent it from becoming an
autocratic body.
The power to place specific
groups of candidates, recommend-
ed by the Nominating Committee
for election, in pairs or triplets on
the election ballot was made op-
tional. A second major 'safeguard
was the delineation of "significant
segments" of the campus, de-
signed to assure the representative
charter of the student govern-
ment.
ORCHESTRAS
by BUD-MOR
featuring,
Bob Ejliott Mark Harvey
Earle Pearson Dick Collins
Dick Pollinger Dick Tilkin
plus many others
1103 S. Univ. NO 2-6362

I

Box Office Opens March 2-7,
NO 8-6300

11-5 P.M.

IL

I

Do You Think for Yo ursef ?(

THESE QUESTIONS
CAN TELL YOUA LOT
ABOUT YOURSELF:

NOW

' '"

DIAL
NO 2-25 13

'^'f mmgul

YES NO [Ii .

YESLl NO1l

5. Do you prefer a salesman who is
anxious to make a quick sale to one
who will patiently answer all your
questions about the product?
6. When arriving late for a party, are
you inclined to join a group of close
friends rather than attempting to
strike up new acquaintances?
7. If you met somebody with a beard,
would you tend to consider him "off-
beat" and treat him with reserve?
8. Are you normally reluctant to go
on a "blind date"?

YES NOD
YES DNOD
YES NOD
YES QjNOLI

u
A BEWlTCNING COMEDY ABOUT AN ENCHANTING SUBJECT-sat
------------
. JAM ERNIE
AU WYK:

Mich. Christian
4 p.m. Lane Hall.
Wylen, "Praying
ness."

Fellowship, March 8,
Speaker: Dr. G. van
Is Dangerous Busi-

YES NO
YESfM NOD

Graduate Outing Club, hiking, March
8, 2 p.m., meet in back of Rackham
(N.w. entrance).
Phone NO 2-4786
for Classified Advertising

A P11005I
TECH-NICOLOR*

i

I

I - - I - --. -- -- - - W,

Also "MR. MAGOO" Color Cartoon * WORLD NEWS

i

Celebrate Save-on-Stereo Days!

LIVING STEREO

9. Do you base your choice of YESr1 NO
a cigarette on what peopleLi L
tell you rather than doing
your own thinking?

' r;'
a'
: 3 "r2::..
.t,;: :,,. ,,,. : :.
:: .
/..1 "
.;, .;M;
t
e ., ;._

GET AN RCA VICTOR

You'll notice that men and women who
think for themselves usually smoke
VICEROY. Their reason? They've made a
thinking choice. They know what they want

"LIVING STEREO"RECORD
FOR ONLY $100 When You Buy One a
the Regular Price

it

' 's~,

tis

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