100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 03, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:SIDAT, MAR 3, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SDAY, MARCH 3, 1959 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,., ;,

March Comes in Like a Lamb

Students Attempt Theft
Of Graveyard Marker

U

Open

Till 9 Every Night

By PETER DAWSON
Three students, two of them
members of Beat Theta Pi fra-
ternity, tried to steal the tomb-
stone found there some time ago,
from the Ann Arbor police station
early Sunday morning, according
to police reports.
The stone, a whitish standstone
cross about two and one half feet
tall, was found in the fraternity's
attic last Tuesday. It is dated 1896.
This is the story, drawn from
two police reports. About 3 a.m.
three students entered the police
station. Two of them, they later
told The Daily, are, members of
Beta Theta Pi, but only they and
possibly one other member knew
of the plan.
They said they would like to
look at the tombstone. They told
the police officers that one of them
had been at a fraternity at North-
western University. There, they
said, they had seen a tombstone
that seemed to be identical with,
the one found in the fraternity
here, judging by its inscription
and its appearance in newspaper
photographs.
The lieutenant sent them out in
back via the front door. While they
were gone, he checked the student
directory and did not find the
name "Percy Adams," which one
of them had said was his name.
Meeting them in back of the
building, the lieutenant showed
them-the stone, even though he
felt they intended to steal it. Busi-
ness called him inside, and they
left. The stone was just outside the
lieutenant's window. He decided
to keep an eye on it, but he was
called from his office.
Three or four minutes later two
policemen in a patrol car spotted
the three students. They were
walking down the sidewalk, carry-

ing the cross, about two blocks1
from the police station.
The patrol car drew up. One
student fled. The others were
taken to the police station.
The tombstone is now back at
the police station, patiently wait-
ing to be identified.
Use Politics
In Oil Prices
Domestic oil producers are us-
ing political weapons to maintain
an artificially high price for their
products, Prof. Albert K. Steiger-
walt of the business administra-
tion school said recently.1
He cited the government's pro-
posals to make current "volun-
tary" oil import quotas mandatory
as the latest in an attempt to
provide political props to oil
prices.
This current "voluntary" sys-
tem has been in operation almost
two years and earlier this week,
the government announced its in-
tentions to make the present sys-
tem mandatory since the volun-
tary import quotas have expired.
Prof. Steigerwalt said when this
happens, the definition of oil
products will be broadened to in-
clude residual oils. This step will
help sustain fuel oil prices in the
American market. Presently, only
gasoline and unfinished oil are
subject to import quotas.
.The professor said the oil price
problem stems from the mid-
1940's when the booming demand
for oil products attracted substan-
tial investment into exploration,
production and distribution, of oil
ithroughout the world.

(Except Saturdays)
WASH YOUR OWN CLOTHES
or
We will wash them for you
Cheap- Fast-Dependable

. ,,
s
+ '
'' ,
. .irk
.

Come in and get a load of all we have to offer you.Yon can throw
your dirty clothes in a washer and wait, or you can let us take care
of them. Besides this we offer you 48-hour shirt service, expert dry
cleaning, and most of all our personal guarantee to satisfaction.

k/e4 tin9owe Xauhdnrnzat

I

510 East William

NO 3-5540

Around the Corner from Student Publications

THE ADVENT OF MARCH-Spring, or at least, its first rains and warmer weather have hit the
University in the last several days. Students who have been slipping and sliding their way to class
over the ice suddenly found themselves slushing and sloshing their way through the puddles formed
by the warm spell which hit the ice a liquifying blow.
TESTIFIES BEFORE CONGRESS:
Haber Notes Unemployment Prospects

+ Use Daily Classifieds +

Testifying before a Senate sub-
committee hearing, Prof. William
Haber of the economics depart-.
ment, said yesterday that Michi-
gan faces "deep and stubborn"
unemployment problems.
Prof Haber continued that
"under the most reasonable esti-
mates for automotive production
for 1959 the number of jobless in
the state probably will average
335,000 for the year and about
265,000 in 1960.
"Thus, even in 1960 when the
situation improves somewhat, over
10 per cent of the labor force will
still be out of work."
Urges TUC Extension
Urging extension of the Tem-
porary Unemployment Compensa-
tion Act, which expires March 31,
Prof. Haber saw a chance to meet
the problem. On a long-range
basis, he !indicated the state must
seek a more diversified industrial
base.
Prof. Haber is one of 17 experts
asked to testify before Sen. Paul
Douglas' (D-Ill.) Subcommittee
on Production and Stabilization
of the Banking and Currency
Committee. Douglas plans hear-
ings throughout the nation deal-
ing with area redevelopment
legislation.
SEUROPE
Dublin to Iron Curtain; Africa to
Sweden. You're accompanied-not
herded. College age only. Also short
trips. $724-$1390
EUROPE SUMMER TOURS
255 Sequoia (Box 4)-Pasadena, Cal.
I

Only one-third of those now un-
employed in the state are eligible
for unemployment insurance and
received it during the last quarter
of 1958, Prof. Haber reported.
Qualify Jobless
If the March'31 expiration date
of TUC is extended, he continued,
Congress should explore "a for-
mula which would qualify jobless
wage earners whose regular and
substantial attachment to the
labor force is clearly established
to receive TUC benefits."
Michigan's unemployment "is
not entirely or perhaps even pri-
marily a problem of the (national
business) recession," Prof. Haber
said. He blamed major shifts in
defense procurement which have
given new emphasis to aircraft
and missiles as one cause of un-
employment.
Decentralization of the auto-
mobile industry has resulted in a
decline of Michigan's share of
t o t a 1 automotive employment
from 57 per cent in 1949 to 48 per
cent last year, Prof. Haber pointed
out.
Offers Motivations
He maintained that "such de-
centralization is motivated by
market considerations, by loca-
tional factors designed to take ad-
vantage of population concentra-
tions to reduce transportation
costs and achieve similar econ-
omics. It is not a flight from
Michigan because of taxes or wage
rates or economic climate."
Naming consolidation of small-
er automotive firms and the clos-
ing of one producer in the post-
war period as another unemploy-
ment factor, he noted that the
Michigan Employment Security
Commission estimates the state
has lost about 75,000 job stations
from these changes.
He listed technological changes,
including automation as a further
reason for unemployment. "This
is difficult to measure except in
the roughest form," Prof. Haber
reported. "The impact of these
changes on employment should
not be underestimated. It is quite
clear the auto companies can
reach pre-recession leyels of pro-
duction with considerably less
than pre-recession employment."
No Industry Exodus f
Prof.Haber declared that "these
factors appear to me to be more
impressive and logical than most
of the talk about taxes, labor
costs and unfavorable business cli-
mate. There is no exodus of in-
dustry out of Michigan. The facts
are to the contrary. There are
more manufacturing establish-
ments in this stat'e now than
there were in 1949 or 1953. Even
the automobile companies, while
they are building elsewhere, have
made substantial investments and
expansion in their Detroit and
other Michigan facilities in the
post-war period.
"Michigan's industry is over-
concentrated in manufacturing
and especially in automotive pro-
duction," Prof. Haber continued.
"There is a crying need for a
greater degree of diversification to

insure a better balance and lesser
dependence upon the economic
fate of one or two major products.
This must be achieved in the next
10 years and it can be with every-
one recognizing its importance
and supporting a concentrated
piogram toward that end."
Only Californta and Florida,
noted Prof. Haber, speaking now
in terms of population,Mhave
grown more rapidly than Michi-
gan in the past eight years, "nor
is there anything to suggest this
rapid rate, of population increase
is about to be checked."
Increased Labor Force
By 1970, Prof. Haber predicted,
Michigan will have a population
of at least 9.4 million and possibly
as high as 10.5 million, as com-
pared with 7.9 million last year.
These figures mean that Michi-
gan's labor force will probably
grow by about one million in the
next 12 years.
Prof. Haber has been a member
of the Federal Advisory Council
on Employment Security since
1948, served as chairman of the
commission that drafted Michi-
gan's unemployment insurance
law and was a member of the
state's first Unemployment Com-
mission. Currently, he is serving
as one of 30 directors of the Com-
mittee on Michigan's Economic
Future and as president of the In-
dustrial Relations Research As-
sociation.
Ii 'I

Like to Dance?
DANCE, CLASSES
Mass meeting Wed., March 4.
O 7 P.M. at LEAGUE BALLROOM O
Cha Cho -Jitterbug-Fox Trot --v
Charleston--etc.
Play bridge much?
BRIDGE LESSONS
Sign up tonight
7 o'clock at the League
Looking for something different'?
We carry imported frames from France, Germany
and Italy in addition to our American styles.
OCCULIST PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
240 Nickels Arcade Dial NO 2-9116

ti" y
VYa
ti" ;{
NY
pti.
y
1;:"i
"nr:
S:
OKI
ti
'ti" {
Q:S
Y
V.
I: t
t:s
r

by
Sizes
When the birds sing and every-
thing's getting green. You know it's
Spring and time to visit our second
floor cotton shop and choose from
our tremendous collection of cot.
tons that you can wear now, through
Summer and into Fall!
Heavenly fabrics and shades for
day and datetime wear.

0

FLQRENCE
BRIDAL.and BEAUTY SHOP
Large selection of
Spring Formals
Wedding Gowns
Cocktail Dresses

I

ABOVE: Your favorite Shirtdress with high wide
belt . .. in color. splashed cotton. comes in
turquoise, rose gerarium, royal and green.
Visit our second floor Cotton Shop today
530 South Forest Ave.

11

11

109 W. Liberty NO 2-5878

Just off South university

' ? " .:: %". r { : . .:%::l"'::.. " : vvRi;r,.'":^?":" " eti:sx.;.,.:+. " ,"; ",".":;."x::r". sr.,: rtirar,. . { .}v, a'f:;: ';:
..":.: .,'sz ;ra+r.".' Y:.{" ' +"°."s;"F :.,^^'ys. ,"%,C;{:. r.e+ .+:. r4°f F... n . . v :if i:.."..".. n.. :}'" ..R.. ,. ^a.7rrr.. .:. .....::
:: +nnr r '.""'. . x.. a...... 'ti?.... .:... ": "."."r.:. .:f }.?":. a.:..:.n..x..... r.. .::::::.v:.o"rv: . ' "'."' ' t ... ... .:":::omr.":".4.:i. n..l...2m":fi....... "
.........::r ...................."nx:rv ... ,..i{uvs":h.......a.......,wi,.......«:.........n....... ."."s..r..:wv:."u.",:..........,.n...ra..r...a..... r. .. :w::,"rc:w.

(C
a

MIKE ROMANOFF-
e Prince of Phonies
.Heimpersonated the aristocracy
of h lf the countries of Europe.
He spent years in and out of U.S.
jails and then crashed Long
Island and Philadelphia high so-
ciety. Now after half a lifetime of
tryinghehaswon his U.S. citizen-
ship. You'll gasp at the fabulous
career of Mike Romanoff-
owner of Hsllywood's most
famous restaurant. Read it in
this week's Star Weekly.
The Star Weekly is a periodi-
cal unlike any other in America.
Every week it brings you fea-
tures, stories, all your favorite
color comics and a complete
novel by a best selling author.
On sale all week.

fine imported flannel stripes or solid color stocks styled
with all of the details of custom-tailoringi fly-front or side zipper

c

.4,.; ri kv::::
t

..

cho
yrnrrrprrt N..
4
~ s

closings, self-beIts or regulation waists, trimly tapered legs!
ose from a vast variety of fashion colors. sizes 10 to 18.
:-: .

r
s
rt.... : r- :
,< ; :yt
;g;
ir.,y,.n ':.
;, ::
::::: ..
t d
}4
;,
:: 4
- ':
.. ... .x.. ,.. .. ....

1

STAR WEEKLY

i

i

look for the BLUE COVER

s, rt. {.n. ;5% . . ".:.;r-{.: . .' . - .. r}Jv r r. , ..._,v ,.-"an}r _.o{,. ".5
no experience necessary

SALE! ALL-WOOL
CUSTOM-DETAILED SLACKS
11.90

mr

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan