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February 27, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY

,

Teachings
By Atheists
A ttacked
Four state legislators accused
some major state and private
schools and colleges Monday with
teaching Texas students that there
is no God, The Daily Texan of
the University of Texas said.
They hinted at a .possible legis-
lative int estigation. Reps. Bill
Hollowell, Joe Chapman, Ben
Lewis and W. T. Dungan asked
the Legislature to pass a bill re-
quiring that teachers in state
schools and colleges take an an-
nual oath that they believe in a
supreme being. Violation of the
proposed law would carry a $100
to $1,000 fine.
"If they don't believe in a su-
preme being they should not be
allowed to teach," Chapman said.
"I have a suspicion that a great
number of atheists are Commu-
nists," he added.
The proposed bill follows the
language of the state constitution
which says no religious test shall
be required as a qualification for
public office "provided he ack-
nowledges the existence of a su-
preme being."
"All' we are: requiring is that
teachers take the same oath as
state officials and others who hold
a public trust," Chapman said.
"We have been advised that
there are some instfuctors, parti-
cularly in the University of Texas,
that are not only atheists but are
expounding opinions in class not
only about atheism but derogatory
to religion," Hollowell told re-
porters.
Lanier Cox, vice-president for
administrative affairs at the uni-
versity said the administration
had no knowledge of atheism be-
ing taught. There is more sincere
interest in religion shown now by
the students and faculty than
there ever has been he said.
Music School
Will Present
organ Recital
Under the auspices of the music
school, William Dennison, Grad.,
will give an organ recital at 8:30
p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
On Sunday in Auditorium A,
Angell Hall, student recitals will
be given by Janet Ruffner, Grad.,
oboe, at 4:16 p.m. and by Linda
Lundquist, '59SM, piano, at 8:30
p.m.

Paul Bunyan Publicity Grows Taller

LOCAL WOODSMEN-Foresters Club members, dressed in logging garb, bring a taste of camp life
to the Diag. Erecting a poster of their "hero," they publicize the Paul Bunyan Dance, to be held
Saturday. The dance, an annual event of the Fo resters Club, will feature a Paul Bunyan logging
camp theme.
BOYCOTT DINING HALL:
Swarthmore Students Protest Food

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SWARTHMORE, Pa.-Recently
Swarthmore College students boy-
cotted the college dining room to
"serve the purpose of making the
desire for better food more dra-
matic." The students said they
were letting the Administration
know that they were dissatisfied
with the quality and preparation
of the food.
Coser To Talk
To Socialists
The Democratic Socialist For-
um, a local discussion group, will
present at 2:30 p.m. Saturday
Prof. Lewis Coser, chairman of the
Brandeis University sociology de-
partment and editor of "Dissent"
magazine.-
The subject of Prof. Coser's talk
will be "Are Intellectuals Obso-
lete?"
The talk with a discussion
period afterward will be held at
the Unitarian Church at 1917
Washtenaw Ave.
Prof. Coser is the co-author,
with Prof. Irving Howe of Bran-
deis University of the book "The
American Communist Party," and
"Sociological Theory," with Ber-
nard Rosenberg. His best known
work is "The Functions of Social
Conflict."

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.-Five Htar-
vard professors returned last week
from Russia where they made pre-
liminary plans for an exchange
program with the University of
Leningrad. A Russian delegation
will visit the university in May to
negotiate the details.
ITHACA, N.Y. -- Cornell Uni-
versity's student government re-
leased its new constitution last
week. It established a nine-man
executive committee which will
have initial jurisdiction over stu-
dent activities and conduct, be
able to reject actions by student
agencies and organizations which
affect students not directly under
its jurisdiction, charter all stu-
dent organizations and distribute
all monies given to student groups
by the university.
Other features of the Constitu-
tion include provisions for amend-
ments and referendums.
MADISON, Wis.- -- The Inde-
pendent Student Association of the
University of Wisconsin "faced
reality" Monday and disbanded
subject to Student Senate ap-
proval.
They did so saying the inde-
pendents want to be independent
and not mixed up in organizations.
Instead they asked to be repre-

sented by a popularly elected man
and woman.
** *
EAST LANSING-The Student
Congress of MSU recently unani-
mously passed a resolution to re-
quest the athletic department to
allow playing of the Star Spangled
Banner before home basketball
games. The department refused to
let the anthem be played last year
because they said the safety of the
stands would be endangered by
everyone standing at once.
As the resolution pointed out,
however, the fans stand in a body
for the MSU Fight Song, and thus
the Star Spangled Banner should
not be omitted on these grounds.

ight
Old Sport'
CAMBRIDGE, England W) -
Tiddlywinks yesterday became
an official inter-varsity sport
between Oxford and Cambridge.
It now takes its place beside
the boat race, rugby union,
track and field, soccer, boxing
and other athletic contests.

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Meteorological Mars Studies
Become Intensely Practical'

According to a United Statesv
Weather Bureau official at the
University, meteorological studies
of Mars have turned 'from the
strictly academic to the intensely
practical.
"If we don't soon learn the
meteorological aspect of Mars,
someone will be there first," Frank
A. Gifford, Jr., head of the Bu-
reau's Oak. Ridge, Tenn., office
said.
Speaking to the Southeastern
Michigan Branch of the American
Meteorological Society, he indicat-
ed that the atmosphere of Mars is
a sort of simplified model of the
Earth's.
Atmosphere Like Ours
"It is much like our own atmos-
phere'at a height of 50,000 feet-
an altitude that human beings
and airplanes already have
reached." Blood boils in such a
rarified atmosphere, so anyone
landing on Mars would, need a
pressure suit, oxygen and a good
supply of water, he continued.
The planet, with a diameter
only slightly over half that of
the Earth's, has no lakes or oceans
and its polar -caps consist of frost
rather than ice.
Seasonal coloration changes
have been observed, Gifford said,
indicating the possible existence
of a low form of vegetation that
could live off the carbon dioxide
which is five to 15 times more
prevalent.on Mars than on earth.
Temperatures Extreme
"Daylight temperature on the
planet may reach 50 .to 59 degrees
and its minimum temperature can

drop to 100 degrees below zero,"
Gifford said.
The fact that temperature goes
above freezing lends further
weight to the belief that there can
be some low form of plant life on
Mars.

I DIAL
NOW! .1 N0 2-3136
06-0-0
COLOR by DELUXE
NEXT: "THE HANGING TREE"
Ciem juI
TON IGHT at
7:00 and 9:00
STANLEY KRAMER'S
"1TH'E MEN"1
with Marion Brando, Teresa Wright
Everett Sloane, Jack Webb
Short: DISNEY'S Water Birds
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
DOSTO I EVS K I'S
"THE IDIOT"
with
Gerald Philippe, Edwige Feuillere,
I - '_ -

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FRANK A. GIFFORD
... speaks about Mars
IN DETROIT
Saturday, March 14, 8:30 P.M.
FORD AUDITORIUM
THE WEAVERS
Tickets at BOB MARSHALL'S
$3.30 $2.75 $2.20 $1.65

ONE PERFORMANCE
SUNDAY, MARCH 1, 3 P.M.
HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
WORLD FAMOUS
DON COSSA CK

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