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February 25, 1959 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY

MODERN METHODS--Teachers of science in high schools may enroll in a course in which they
learn the latest experimental techniques for elementary and advanced science classes, particularly
chemistry and physics. These science methods classes are a small part of the offerings of the National
Science Foundation program at the University.
[nstitute Improves Teachers

Enrollments
Show Rise
in Colleges
On-campus enrollments in all
Michigan colleges and universities
increased to a total of 143,664 stu-
dents last fall, Lynn M. Bartlett,
Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion, has announced.
"In spite of more restrictive ad-
mission requirements in many of
the Michigan higher education in-
stitutions" last fall's enrollment
set a new record, exceeding the
previous record (set in the fall of
1957) of 136,254 by 5.4 per cent,
he said.
The community colleges in the
state experienced the greatest per-
centage of growth in total on-
campus enrollemnts, Bartlett not-
ed. Total enrollment in these
colleges approaches the enrollment
in the University, and it represents
15.8 per cent of total state enroll-
ments.
Exceeds Enrollment
The number of students on cam-
pus at the University was tabulat-
ed at 23,506, and the total credited
to the 15 community colleges was
22,784. The University again ex-
ceeded the enrollment in any
other Michigan institution, with
Michigan State University second,
claiming 19,516 students last fall.
Wayne State University's fall
enrollment was 18,313; at Western
Michigan University, the office
counted 7;804 students, a big drop
from the total in the smallest of
the "Big Three."
Non-public or private institu-
tions reached a total of 34,915 stu-
dents, accounting for 24.3 per cent
of the state's total. The Univer-
sity of Detroit exceeded all other
private schools with an on-campus
enrollment of 10,520.
Shows Increase
State institutions accounted for
the rest of the enrollment - 59.9,
per cent. The total number of
students reached 85,965, an over-
all increase of 2.9 per cent over
the fall, 1957 enrollment of 83,965.
All of the state colleges-and uni-
versities provided off-campus pro-
grams through their extension
services, Bartlett said. The total
off-campus enrollments for all
public institutions reached 14,115
last fall, a slight decrease from the
enrollment in the fall of 1957 of
14,607.
Only a few of the private insti-
tutions offered off-campus pro-
grams and none of the community
colleges offered such programs,
Bartlett commented.

I

THE DISC SHOP PRESENTS

THEODORE BIKEL
March 8 ... 8:00 P.M. At the Armory
Tickets: $1.65 and $2.75
Available at
THE DISC SHOP . ... 1210 S. University
and at LIBERTY MUSIC ....211 S. State St.

I

The Real Folk Singers are in Detroit
Saturday, March 14, 8:30 P.M
FORD AUDITORIUM
THE WAVER

-Daily-Allan Winder
PATIENT EXAMINATION-Dr. Edmund H. Hagen watches while
Dr. Philip J. Youngblood conducts an examination on a patient
in one of the Oral Surgery Clinic's modern operating rooms. From
300 to 400 patients a month take advantage of the facilities offered
by the Clinic.
Oral Surgery Clinic Offers
Treatmen, Trinn

Tickets
$3.30

at BOB MARSHALL'S
$2.75 $2.20 $1.65

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By PHILP POWER
The Oral Surgery Clinic has suc-
ceeded in riding two horses at
the same time.
The Clinic, located on the fifth
level of the Outpatient Building
-at the Medical Center, acts both
as a clinic for the treatment of 300
to 400 patients a month and func-
tions as a training center for stu-
dents in the field of oral surgery.
Patients receiving treatment at
the Clinic fall into three main
groups. Many people in the Ann
Arbor area use the services offered
by the clinic's regular staff doc-
tors, residents receiving advanced
training and dental hygienists, in-
stead of going to a regular dentist
for minor treatment.
Another group of patients are
those who are referred to the Clin-
ic for treatment or diagnosis by
their own dentists.
Diagnose Problems
"We have a higher percentage
f diagnostic problems than the
-entist finds in his regular prac-
tice. Due simply to the size and
varied facilities of the University's
Medical Center, we can take care
of some diagnostic problems more
effectively than the community
dentist," Prof. James R. Hayward,
director of the Clinic, said.
The ratio between referred

SUMMER PROGRAM:
'U' To Offer Courses
In Language Teaching

cases and patients who come in to
the Clinic on their own is estimat-
ed to be around one to one.
The Clinic also offers its serv-
ices to patients in University Hos-
pital, as well as to outpatients.
Treat Toothaches, Cancer
Patients coming to the Clinic on
their own usually need minor
treatment such as tooth extrac-
tion. Those who are referred by
their own dentist, however, need
services ranging from setting jaw
fractures to diagnosis and treat-
ment of tumors.
An important segment of the
Clinic is the Cleft Palate Follow-
up Center, which treats cleft pal-
ate conditions.
The Clinic has developed a long
range, interdepartmental program
to treat this condition.
Prescribe Early Care
Treatment at an early age, if
possible, is most effective, as the
child develops his speech habits
with no impeding deformity, doc-
tors at the Clinic remarked, and
psychological damage from the
condition is minimized.
The other main function of the
Clinic results from the fact that
it functions under the School of
Dentistry and the surgery depart-
ment of University Hospital. In
this regard, it acts as a teaching
center in the field of oral surgery.
Provides Graduate 'Study
A program for graduate dentists
is centered at the Clinic It in-
cludes a one-year study of the
basic sciences and clinical experi-
ence at the dental school. The
next two years are spent at the
Clinic, where the student makes
regular ward rounds and gains
instruction in surgical procedures.
Music Groups
To Perform
The University's Stanley Quar-
tet and the Tappan C o n c e r t
Orchestra will present a joint con-
cert at 7:45 p.m. today in the
Tappan Junior High School Audi-,
torium.
Several movements from fa-
miliar quartet literature will be
played by the Stanley, Quartet,
and some of its members will dis-
cuss the problems of chamber
music performance.
The program to be performed
by the Tappan Orchestra will cen-
ter mainly upon selections which
they will present at the South-
eastern Michigan Band and
Orchestra - Festival in Livonia,
Mich., on Saturday.
ORCHESTRAS
by BUD-MOR
featuring
Blaser-Johnson Johnny Harberd
Boll Weevils The Kingsmen
R. G. Quartette
Jim Soluri -- Men of Note
Andy Anderson
plus many others

Union Theatre Trip to Detroit
Thursday, March 5
WILLIAM INGE'S
"THE DARK AT THE
TOP OF THE STAIRS"
"William Inge's Best Play"-Brooks Atkinson, N.Y. Times
Tickets at Union Student Offices Mon.-Fri. 2-5
Limited number of tickets available

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By JANE McCARTHY
"The overall purpose of the
Foreign Language Institute to be
held at the University this sum-
mer is to enable teachers to get
intensive refreshment in language
teaching and acquaint them with
the modern approach to presenta-
tion and pedagogy," Prof. Otto
Graf of the German department
said yesterday.
The Institute, one of four across
the country made possible by the
National Defense Education Act
of 1958 which provides funds for
the Institutes and stipends for
teachers in elementary and sec-
ondary public schools qualified to
participate, will be held from June
22 to August 14, 1959, under the
direction of Prof. Graf.
He said that four programs will
be offered. The first of these ; is
required of all participants, tak-
ing up five-sixths of the total
program, while the remainder of
the time will be devoted to one of
three elective programs, depend-
ing upon the participants' major
interest.
Require Course
"The required course," he con-
tinued, "consists of a systematic
review of the major language,
which may be French, German,
Russian or Spanish, a course in the,
cultural analysis of the country
where the language is spoken,;
principles of linguistics and thej
equipment and functions of the
language laboratory."
The refresher work in the lan-
guage will involve extensive use of
the language laboratory and
aural-oral drill. The modern ap-
proach to teaching a language,
Prof. Graf explained, is based on
the way one learns his native
speech. uy
Under the cultural analysis parti

of the program, lectures will be
given in the foreign language
based on literature and the arts,
history, political institutions, edu-
cation and social issues such as
the status of women, problens of
minorities and religion.
The three elective programs are
for teachers of foreign language
in elementary schools, teachers of
foreign languages in secondary
schools and teachers of advance
placement programs in public and
private preparatory schools, Prof.
Graf said. Russian is included
only in the program for secpndary
school teachers.

Gives Opportunity
"The advance placement pr(
gram as it now exists in a numb
of schools," he said, "is a speci
opportunity for ambitious an
qualified students preparedt
satisfy*some of the requiremen
for graduation from college whi
still in high school.
"S t u d e n t participants wor
through a college syllabus an
upon .successful completion of a
examination qualify for advan
credit and standing in the disc
pline pursued in the program.
This sort of program is becom
ing more and more popular, Pro
Graf continued. High school ad
ministrators are realizing th
they have made extensive prepar
ation for slow learners withou
making sufficient allowance fo
the exceptional student.
Foreign language instruction o
the elementary school level is not
part of the established curricului
in many school systems, andi
more than a trend or a fad, Pro.
Graf pdinted out. The Nationa
Defense Education Act has recog
nized the fact that the demani
for such teachers is much greate
than the present supply.

o-
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HEY GANG!
TIME IS RUNNING OUT!
Bring your money
to the DIAG
TODAY
and order your
1959 MofChAeNSA
BIG CAMPUS SALE

t

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1103 S. UNIV.

NO 2-6362

.I

p

f.
al
TONIGHT through Saturday at 8
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
"The Barber of Sville"
presented by the Department of Speech and School of Music

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irlq;DIAL
NOW ! FA ll INO 2-3 136
20cw~v w
enrnu xd '' fQO~~- ND oo -
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