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August 29, 1968 - Image 79

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-08-29

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Thursday, ┬░August 29, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pcge Seven

Thursday, August 29, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

-*Release funds
for'U' buildings

Funds released recently by the
State Administrative Board will
enable the University to complete
construction of the M e d i c a 1
Science II Building and the
Heating Plant project.
James Brinkerhoff, director of
. plant extension, announced that
the board had released $2,120,000
for completion of the Medical
Science Building and $1,500,000
for completion of the heating
plant. The University also receiv-.
ed $2,000,000 for continued con-
4-
'U' lans
Study on
teachin
The University's Center for Re-
search in Learning and Teaching
(CRLT) this fall is launching a
program in which various college
faculties will design "self-instruc-
tion training materials" f o r
teachers evaluating methods of
instruction.
With a $59,000 grant from the
Esso Education Foundation, the
project is an extension of CRLT's
instruction workshops on educa-
tional materials.
George L. Geis, a research asso-
ciate with CRLT and director of
the workshops, said, "Our decision
to expand the training sequence in
programmed instruction is one re-
sponse to the need we see for
broadening the definition of
teaching' to include the develop-
ment and management of instruc-
tional materials."
Geis claimed what he called
"programmed units" would allow
more individualized response from
students of varying abilities and
educational backgrounds. "This
would encourage them to progress
at rates consistent with their in-
terests and capabilities," Geis
added.
CRLT plans to include "mate-
rials to guide the instructor in
developing instructional units for
his own courses" in a package with
a "self-instructional nature."
Included in the package -will be
guidelines for developing tests of
students' achievement in various
fields. It will also include sugges-
tions for group activities, reading
assignments, discussions, a n d
topics.
The University is collaborating
on this project with Lake Mich-
igan College, a community college
in Benton Harbor.
t

1struction of the Dental School
Building and $500,000 for addi-
tions to University Hospital.
DATA FOR REGENTS
Data to provide new completion
dates for the projects is being
compiled for presentation at the
September meeting of the Re-
gents. The dates have been set
back because of recent strikes by
construction workers.
All Medical School classes will
move to the new Medical Sciences
Building upon its completion.
This. will free East Medical Build-
ing for use by the Literary Col-
lege.
The Literary College is cur-
rently moving into the former
administration building as space
is made available. The building
has been renamedthe Literature,
Science, and the 'Arts Building.
WORK STOPPAGES
Work stoppages on the new Ad-
ministration Building have pre-
vented occupation of the' building
as planned. University President
Robben Flemming and his staff
and Vice President for University
Relations Michael Raddock and
his staff recently moved to the
new building. Other Nunits h a d
moved in earlier in the summer.
Brinkerhoff said that additional
funds would be needed from the
state for completion of the Dental
School Building. The Federal gov-
ernment and private gifts are also
being used for the construction
project.
The Heating Plant project in-
cludes conversion from coal fired
to gas fired burners and an addi-
tion to the plant.

Teacher walkouts
likely in MichigaL
LANSING (/) - Spokesmen for are operating under a two-year "coming home to
Michigan teachers warn that con- contract. vengeance."
tract disputes may delay school Nonetheless, O'Brien s a i d Negotiators ino
opening for some 178,000 young- teachers in three MFT districts- dicated some tea(
sters in 28 districts this fall. which he identified only by saying Erickson said, bec
"Everybody would like settle- they are in the greater Detroit files are filled w
men,"EeryOdy'Brdikeseetry- area--have "ordered strike phones like refusing tor
ment," James O'Brien, secretary- and set up strike offices." bottle. This precl
treasurer of the Michigan Federa-
tion of Teachers (MFT) said re- "The teachers feel that they bargaining."
cently. "Everybody is pushing for have rights and privileges and Erickson said th
the opening of schools in the tra- they maintain in most cases-by district "The boa
ditional Labor Day week-but a vote-that unless agreeable pared."
it's not going to happen." settlement is reached, they will "They appear a
not come in to work," he said. no positions," h
Some 111 of the state's more "The districts have set up what teachers proposed
than 530 school districts were O'Brien termed "complete work about 40 articles
without contracts yesterday; but stoppage communications n e t - May, but the boa
officials from the MFT and the works, established hot lines" to sponded in terms
Michigan Education Association feed information to those in- three-fourths oft
(MEA) appeared optimistic about volved. Some MEA di
some. They are prepared to withhold bracing for delays
"We do anticdate some will services "because there has been ing, Erickson said
settle," O'Brien said. The MFT no move to meet demands or ments are being m
represents teachers in 20 districts, come near them," O'Brien said, teachers, for prov
half of which still are without pointing to one district in which the latest inform
contracts. he said the school board offered tract progress an
"All our efforts are bent toward teachers a contract including a visions throughl
reaching agreement," said Kai $200 pay cut from last year. ions.
Erickson, MEA chief negotiator, Erickson said about half the 25 Lt. Gov. Willia
"and in some areas this appears MEA districts in which work stop- sent special messa
possible." Of the MEA's 516 local pages are anticipated are in the both negotiating
units, 415 have reached settle- Wayne County area. Others are unsettled school
ments. scattered throughout the state, he speedy settlem
The outlook is brighter t h is said. charged with over
year than last, when school open- He described some negotiating tiations, is workin
ing was delayed for roughly one- sessions as "armed camps," in districts throughi
fourth of Michigan's 2.08 million which previous hostilities are Mediator Board.
children and 20,000 of their 84,000
teachers.
Some 300,000 of those young-
sters were in Detroit, where the CHARGE I'
11,500 teachers delayed opening -
day for two weeks in a contract y PRESCRI
dispute. Detroit teachers this year I. . COSM

I

o roost with a
one district in-
chers are bitter,
cause "personnel
ith little things
pick up a milk
udes good faith
,hat in the same
rd has not pre-
at meetings with
he said. "The
a contract with
sometime in
ard has not re-
s of position on
the proposals."
stricts also are
in school open-
. Local arrange-
nade for advising
iding them with
mation on con-
d financial pro-
local credit un-
am Milliken has
ages to heads of
teams in every
district, urging
ents. Milliken,
'seeing the nego-
ng with the local
the State Labor

-Associated Press
Catch-allprotest
A 24-hour vigil of mourning for what the demonstrators said is the suppression of human rights
in Vietnam, Czechoslovakia and Chicago begins today with a march near Chicago's International
Amphitheater, site of the Democratic National Convention. The marchers moved into a church to
conduct the vigil.

ATTENTION
STUDENT WIVES:

PTIONS
AETICS

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN offers a wide
selection of excellent opportunities for full-time,
permanent employment. Choose from a variety
of interesting and rewarding positions including:

S UBSCRIBJE
TO THE,
MICHIGAN DAILY

11 iOMEN'S
U' ,TOILETRIES

0
e
"
e

OFFICE (Secretarial-Clerical)
LIBRARY ASSISTANTS
DATA PROCESSING (Tab, Key-,
punching, Programming Systems)
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS
NURSES ((R.N. & L.P.N.)
X-RAY TECHNICIAN
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGISTS

" OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
" LABORATORY TECHNOLOGISTS
These positions are in a variety of academic, re-
search, patient care, and administrative units, 10-
cated on the Central Campus, North Campus, Med-
ical Center and willow Run.
Salaries commensurate with education and exper-
ience. Full fringe benefit program with wide op-
portunity for promotion.
Those interested in Full-time, permanent positions
contact Central Personnel. 1020 L.S. & A. Bldg.,
Phone 764-7280 or Medical Center Personnel A6001,
University Hospital, Phone 764-2172.
Part-time or temporary applicants apply, Part-time

sophomore

(sof'-o-mor )

I .

a

second year student; 2. a stu-
dent having acquired at least
twenty-four credit hours.

are you a sophomore? if

you

a re, then come to the mass

meeting' for

SOPH SHOW

at

lydia mendelssohn theatre at
7:30 p.m. tuesday, september
third. it's for sophomores only.

(Clinical & Research) Placement Office, 2200 Student Activities Bldg.
1112 South University .,,'Phone 663-5533 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Highest Quality Always --An Equal Opportunity Employer--
-
UNION - LEAGUE
LABOR DAY WtEEKEND.
t presents
Last Summer Days
STARTS TOMORROW
Watch for These Exciting Events:
8:00 P.M.-FREAK-OUT ON STATE STREET
Take a free trip to the beat of the charging Rhinocerous of Soul Band, 9 P.M. to 12 Midnight. Co-sponsored with the State Street
merchants.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 31 c
10:00 A.M.-AUTO AND CYCLE ROAD RALLIES
MOTORCYCLE entrance fee: $1.00 per cycle and free for members of the Ann Arbor Motorcycle Association. Co-sponsored with
the A.A.M.A.
AUTOMOBILE entrance fee: $1.25 per car. Each car must have a navigator and a driver.
8:30 P.M.-JUDY COLLINS IN CONCERT
HILL AUDITORIUM. Ticket prices: $2.00, $2.50, $3.00 at Hil I Auditorium and at the LSD Depot. Good seats still available.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 (
2:00 P.M.-THE KING AND HIS COURT
Advance ticket prices are $1.25 for adults and $.75 for student s and are available at the LSD Depot. At the UM Baseball Sta-
dium. Adults, $1.50; students, $1.00; children 8 and under, free.
8:00 P.M.-HOOT!
Sing on the grass until your mind's content. Hootenany on Palmer Field. Bring your guitars.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2
1:00 P.M.-LAY-IN ON PALMER FIELD
Catch the sun's rays, live band for your listening and dancing enjoyment.
0.11 D A A n ITrr1nnD AAn\/II

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