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August 29, 1968 - Image 78

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-08-29

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, August 29, 1968

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, August 29, 1968

zech,
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
AP Special Correspondent
Moscow's agreement with
Czechoslovak leaders 1 e a v e s
many questions unanswered, but
some conclusions seem inescap-
able. One is that both Russians
and Czechoslovaks will pay heav-
ily for what happened. Another
is that Soviet troops will remain
in Czechoslovakia until Moscow is
certain that the Communist party
there has a reform fever under
strict control.
For the Czechoslovaks, the news
can only be bad, despite reassur-
ances of leaders who claim they!
did not budge, while confronting
Moscow, from an internal pro-
gram intended to cure the ills of
20 years of' Communist rule.
The action program, adopted in1
April, must undergo changes
under the terms of the Moscow
communique. The Russians were
less interested in what the Czech-
oslovaks did with their economy
than they were in being dead sure
that a ruling party surrendered

pact raises

questions

none of its prerogatives. Unless
the Czechoslovak party gave up
some of its authority, the action
program had little chance of suc-
cess.
A framework of the reform
program will remain, much as the
Russians may dislike the whole
idea. For a , time, j at least,3
Alexander Dubcek survives as
party chief, even though Moscow
last week denounced him for
treachery and "right-wing op-
portunism." But many a Czecho-
slovak will now feel sold out.
The action program obviously
must be braked. In propaganda
accompanying the occupation,
Moscow described Czechoslova-
kia's program as a "legal plat-z
form" to attack party rule. There
is little chance the Kremlin will
tolerate such a structure.
It seems inevitable that there
will be a severe clampdown on
Czechoslovak press and broad-
casting which, for a few months
gloried in a freedom they had
not known for 20 years. Probably

more than any sing]
the reform, the lifting
ship irked the Russia
mitting criticism of{
and of the Soviet Un
The Moscow comm
Czechoslovakia couldt
its program "on th
Marxism-Leninism,"
Moscow which defin
Leninism.
The communique p
cek to "effective meas
. the leading roleo
ing class and Commu
That means, in ma
things will revert to
were before January, v
form movement got
head of steam.
Warsaw Pact and S
will be on hand fo
Presicent Ludvik Sv
there is a basic ag
gradual withdrawal,
that time their prese
litical reality."
Czechoslovaks will
happens now to the

e aspect of framed "The 2,000 Words" man-
g of censor- ifesto indicting 20 years of Sta-
ans by per- linist rule? What happens to a
communism long list of newspapers denounced
ion. by name in the Soviet press as
zunique said instruments of "imperialist in-
proceed with trigue"?
e basis of What happens to Cestmir Cisar,
but it is the party secretary violently de-
es Marxism- nounced by Moscow for "violation
of Leninist norms"? What hap-
ledged Dub- pens to Eduard Goldstuecker and
sures serving Ota Sik, economists who helped
of the work- produce the action program?
nist Party." What happens to writers like Jan
,ny respects, Prochazka Ludvok Vaculik and
what they Ivan Svitak, blasted by Moscow
when theyre- for speaking out? What happens
up its full to Interior Minister Joseph Pavel,
whose dismissal Moscow demand-
ed; 'to Gen. Vaclav Prchlik, who
Soviet troops dared criticize some aspects of the
r insurance. Warsaw alliance?
voboda says If experience is a guide, ortho-
reement for dox Communists who toed the
but "until Kremlin line will reappear in
nce is a po- .places of authority, shielded by
Russian favor. Some of the others,
ask: What at best, seem destined for obliv-
writers who ion.

( % s~:
zN>
/1r
' ...

But there is bad news for the
Kremlin, too. It has a heavy net
loss to show for its massive de-
monstration of power. What it
achieved by force might have
been done earlier by swift surgery,
or been accomplished less noisily
by application of economic pres-
sure for which the Kremli4 had
all the levers in its hands.
The Kremlin decided against
military force, t h e n reversed
gears. For the indecision some-
one in high places is likely toE
have 'to pay.I
The result has delivered a new'
blow to the will o' the wisp goal
of world Communist unity.,Mos-
cow has exposed Russia and other
Communist-ruled nations to new
contagion among their intellec-
tuals by dramatically illuminating
the Czechoslovak fight for liber-
ty.

Associated Press
Yippies ride high
The serenity surrounding the equestrian monument of Civil War G en. John Logan is broken as members of the Yippies and Hippies
climb over the staid figure during a demonstration in Chicago. The general holds his flag high as do the demonstrators, who are in town
protesting in connection with the Democratic National Convention being held on the city's south side.

Law increases student loan funds

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FOR FUN AND
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Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

By JILL CRABTREE
President Johnson has signed a
law extending until Oct. 31 the
federal-state guaranteed student
loan program, a program which
aims at relieving higher education
costs primarily for middle-income
families.
The key provision in the exten-
sion is raise in the interest rate
students in college, vocational,
business and technical schools
must pay to lenders from 6 per
cent to a 7 per cent ceiling.
This provision will enable more
loans to be made to students be-
tween now and September, when
Congress is expected to pass simi-
lar legislation as part of the 1968
Higher Education Act Amend-
ment.
The student loan program was
originally established in 1965 as
part of that year's Higher Educa-
tion Act. Since then lenders have
found the 6 per cent interest rate,
which compares unfavorably with
rates on mortgage and auto loans,
far too low to support the increas-
ing demand. Some banks have
reserved student loan funds for
their preferred clients in upper
incomebrackets, while others have
stopped making the loans allto-
gether.
As a result, only about $248
million in loans was made' to
330,000 students in the first aca-
demic year ending June, 1967.
Only 360 students from the Uni-
versity loaned money under the
trogram during this time, borrow-
ing a total of $295,000.
Under the student guaranteed
loan program, an undergraduate,
student may borrow as much as
$1,000 for each academic year, up
to a total of $5,000. A full-time
graduate or professional school
student may borrow a maximum
of $1,500 a year. The combined
loans for undergraduate and post-
graduate study may total as much

as $7,500, according to the Of-
fice of Financial Aids.
The amount of money an in-
dividual student may receive de-
pends on the policy of the lending
institution at which he applies,
his needs, and the supply of re-
serve funds at the state student
loan guarantee agency.
Local institutions participating
in the program are the Huron
Valley National Bank, the Ann'
Arbor Bank, the National Bank

o end in sight for sneezing,

#i

wheezing, stfed-up noses
For most reasonably normal, re- the prime targets of investigation. -The same amount of pollenm
laxed and content people, Fall Research teams headed by Dr. seems to produce a more violent
signals a pleasant and enjoyable Kenneth P. Mathews and Dr. Wil reaction late in the season than
time of year complete with multi- liam R. Solomon are studying out- at the beginping.
colored leaves and cool evening of-season exposure, pollen con- -Antihistamine medicine, al-
breezes. centrations, nasal airway , re- lergy shots; and air conditioning
But for a select few million or sponses, and related changes in filter out pollen and may provide
so, autumn brings nothing but blood and body fluids to increase relief,
discomfort, runny noses, tearing the total knowledge about the
eyes, stuffed up heads, and more disease. -Patients with pure ragweed
aches and pains than, even Exed- While hay fever, itself, is a per- allergy can tolerate short periods
rin can handle. plexing affliction, the already oF exposure to high pollen con-
This unfortunate part of the known facts concerning the dis- cntratians out of season without
population suffers from a rela- ease are no less baffling: showing any symptoms at.all.
tively sinple but still baffling -A person with ragweed hay I This particular test is perform-
malady - hay fever. While their fever often shows a positive re- ed in an exposure chamber used
present condition is none too rosy, action to skin tests, but a posi- in allergy research at the 'U'
their future doesn't look especially tive skin test does not always Medical center. At differeit times
promising either. Doctors readily mean he has hay fever. of the year, volunteers spend an
admit there is no sure cure. hour and a half to four hours in
Although not even a precise -Hay fever sufferers may con- the test chamber while scientists
scientific explanation of hay fever tact asthma, too. cratest cambrwle stm sts
exists, researchers keep studying -pIf ytu haven't had hay fever cete arermined pollen con-
and analyzing the condition hop- by age 25, you probably won't get ptentn
ing to find the key that will bring it. But if you come to Northte.
relief to sufferers. America as an adult, you might Every few minutes during the
In the Montgomery Allergy Re- get it at any age. test, the volunteer breathes into
Iearhe Lbonatgorie aUnverty --Hay fever is one of the most a mask hooked up to an oscillo-
search Laboratories at University !omn"e"dsae xei scope and an automatic recorder.
Medical center, hay fever--espec- common "new" diseases experi- soeada uoai eodr
ial ragwee hay fever-sone- enced by foreign students living The results measure airway re-
ially ragweed hay fever-is in the United States. However, sistance-"stuffiness"-in nasal
Stheyusually don't show any passages.
symptoms for their first two years Though the apparatus has been
here. . used only as a research tool, it
-Sex, Race, color, or socio- may be used 'for general diag-
economic status has no obvious noses, Mathews and Solomon say.
bearing on susceptibility to the Until the cure for hay fever is
disease. found, however, GEZUNDHEIT.

and Trust, and the King Seeley pay the entire 7 per cent interest
Credit Union, The Citizens Bank while the student is in college,
of Saline, the National Bank of and 3 per cent after graduation.
Ypsilanti and the Ypsilanti Sav- The repayment period begins 9
ings Bank also give out loans un- to 12 months after graduation,
der this program. and may extend from 5 to 10
Guaranteed loans are generally years, subject to a maximum of
made to students in good academic 15 years from the date of the first
standing in approved institutions loan. If a student joins the Peace
regardless of the family's finan- Corps or Vista after graduation,
cial status. If the family's ad- or if he goes into military service,
justed income is under $15,000 a he may get a special moratorium
year, the Federal Government will on payments while he is in service.

1

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
MEN'S GLEE CLUBs
GENERAL MEETING
Tues., Sept. 3, 7:00 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION Rms. 3r-s

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