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November 26, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-26

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Tuesday, November 26, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, November 26, 'I 968 THE MlCHlGAI~4 DAILY Page Three

PRIZE OF CRUDE OIL:

Soviet

Union bids for influence

the
news today
ley; The Assoc ia/ed V;(,, til ICullr P c Pu Sicc

in Nigeria
By ARNOLD ZEITLIN KwameT
LAGOS, Nigeria P) - Back- ianTcup
ing up its military aid with of- minder
fers of postwar economic help, ago, you
the Soviet Union is bidding to Soviet-b
become a major influence in ers mad
tack on
Nigerian affairs. ing strip
The prize is alluring. Nigeria, iala. Th
with more than 50 million peo- occasion
ple, is by far Africa's most pop- against1
ulous land. Extricated from a lift; the
draining civil war, it could pro- "Behin
duce a buoyant economy float- the Sovi
ing on crude oil. apprecia
Nigeria's ports provide a ha- ness tod
ven for Soviet vessels forced to done,"
reach the Far East around Af- Nigeria's
rica because the Suez Canal is ternal a
closed. It could be the West Af- His re
rican base of operations the So- obvious.
viet Union lost when its for- refuseda
tunes fell with President tling ins

with military supplies

Nkrumah in the Ghana-
of February 1966.
war is an insistent re-
of Soviet aid. A week
ung Nigerians in o 1 d,
uilt MIG 17 jet fight-
.e their first pight at-
Biafra's lifeline land-
p between Uli and Ih-
.e Nigerians hailed the
as a great victory
the Biafran arms air-
e Soviets basked.
nd our attitude toward
et Union is a feeling of
ation for this willing-
do what others have not
said Dr. Okei Arikpo,
s commissioner for ex-
ffairs,
ference was oblique but
The Americans have
arms aid to Nigeria, set-,
stead for $15 million for

civilian relief work. The Brit-
ish obliged only after the Rus-
sians produced 16 MIGS for
Nigeria in July, 1967.
From his office overlooking
Lagos harbor, Arikpo could see
the Soviet freighter Pula,. car-
rying vehicles for the military.
The Soviet Union, a country
whose propaganda once was
barred by law from Nigeria, has
come a long way in a short time.
Arikpo, who visited Moscow
in July, says: "I think now
people feel genuine friendship
for the Russians. Of course, we
have no desire to change our
system."
Besides planes and vehicles the
Russians have provided bombs
and more than 200 technicians.
Credit to buy more war mater-
ial was supposedly a subject of
discussion with the economic
delegation. Nigeria's foreign
currentcy reserves are virtually
depleted.
Since 1965 the Soviets have
had a standing loan offer of
about $56 million for a steel
mill.
Relations between the Rus-
sians and the Nigerians reflect
some wariness, but business be-
twhen Nigeria and Russia is up.
3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
- rp

RfNfWmrTEETW 4"TlU IEOCAN SINANN NEFNNIENI
"AN ICE-COLD WARNING
OF INSIDIOUS YOUNG
EVIL TRIUMPHANT...,,
EMPHATICALLY JOLTING!"
- Howard Thompson, N. Y. Tim
"POWERF:UL!
IT SHOULD PROBABLY BE
LIMITED TO A MATURE,
SERIOUS-MINDED AUDIENCE!"
-ArcherWinsfen, N. Y. Yos
"SHOCKING!
A VIOLENT AND ADMITTEDLY
SHOCKING FILM;WE GO
BEYOND HOMOSEXUALITY INTO I
PERVERSION AND SADISM!"
- Judith Crid, Heald tribune

ABOUTTHE 49r-

I
r

Trade soared sevenfold to
more than $14 million between
1966 and 1967 - the balance
shifting from $700,000 in favor
of Russia to a nearly $8.4 mil-
lion surplus for Nigeria a year
later.
The difference was in $11.2
million in cocoa beans Russia
bought in 1967. The year before
they had bought not a bean,
partly because they still were
committeed to buy from Ghana.
The Soviet Union backs a
monthly magazine edited by a
Nigerian awarded a Lenin
Peace Prize in 1966. Nigeriati
newspapers are running more
photos purchased from Russian
agencies.
Aeroflot, the Soviet airline, is
expected to start a Lagos-Mos-
cow route. From its experience
with a Moscow-Accra run, the
weekly plane is more likely to
produce prestige than profit.
However, 75' students on Rus-
sian scholarships were flown to
the Soviet Union to begin stud-
ies in August. They joined about
700 other Nigerians at school
there.
Not all improve with Russian
education. Officials at Lagos
University Teaching ,Hospital
said only one was qualified out
of six medical students return-
ing from Russia to do their in-
ternship.
In general, ideology appears
to play a small role in Soviet-
Nigerian relations. Russians
tend to be aghast at African
ideas of socialism. Half the Ni-
gerians profess Islam and most
yearn for a chance to be capi-
talists. They are suspicious of
communism.
The Soviet Union's main riv-
als for influence in Nigeriasthe
British and the Americans,
voice unconcern over the Rus-
sian intrusion. "I think it might
be a good idea if the RussiansI
spent a little of their money
here," said an American diplo-
mat.
But the Soviet activity embar-
rasses Britain's Labor govern-
ment, which has justified its
supply of arms to the federal
government on the basis that
this would keep out the Rus-
sians and would enable Britain
to maintain its influence with
the Nigerians.

i

0B ONE UNDER 16 YARS of AG WILL DE ADMTTED
drected by igot Soman "* oueenplay by Lars GortinL
"hoed in association with P0murcorn-Wormser, Inc. " prints by Moveab

LAST 2 DAYS
7:00 & 9:00

l

& PFWE!'
COLOR by Delxe
ninadatists
L .

FEIE
IAMBR

-Associated Press i
Treasury Secretary Henry Fowler
UJ.S. stalls call for
inoney conference
BRUSSELS PiV - The United' Johnson would not want to be
States and France are fighting a ' blamed for even a slight devalua-
quiet battle over whether to hold tion. If and w h e n the United
a major international conference States disengages from Vietnam,
that would revise the values of the the dollar is expected to grow
world's currencies for t h e first stronger, and maybe no devalua-
time in almost a quarter of, a cen- tion would be needed.
tury. Sone experts say eagerness to
T h e purpose of a conference delay a conference may have been
would be to halt the crises that a major reason for Johnson's
have b e e n shaking the world's strong pledge of support to France
Imoney markets every few months, after the decision not to devalue
Henry H. Fowler, U.S. secretary the franc. If the French decision
of the Treasury, has come out is a failure and a new crisis blows
strongly against a conference. He'
saysngynaroingst h nesituaions Hup in the next few weeks, it might
says improving t h e situations make a conference inevitable.
should be an "evolutionary pro-
cess." President Charles de Gaulle has
President Johnson's administra- long urged a conference. Foreign
tion, with less than two months Minister Michel Debre has asked
to go. does not want to get into for one repeatedly over the past
an enterprise of this kind or to year.
commit President-elect Richard Some experts think t h a t De
M. Nixon. A conference now could Gaulle in refusing to devalue the
bring an increase in the price of franc was determined to show that
gold and a decrease in the value if support from other countries
of the dollar - though probably failed to save it, the international
only a small one. monetary system would be in such
disarray that only a major con-
ference could settle matters and
give world business the peace it
needs.

IIUlm

o? ii

"THE TWO OF US"-begins Thursday

.............

.o

i

THE CZECH GOVERNMENT yesterday announced
new restrictions on private travel to the West by Czech-
oslovakians.
Deputy Interior Minister Jaraslav Rybar said such trips
to the West would be judged against "state interest" and for-
bidden if they were for employment or study or if the traveler
indicated he intended to stay abroad with permission.
Although Ryber called the restrictions temporary, they
virtually end the relatively unrestricted travel td the West
Czechs had enjoyed last year. Ryber said trips abroad were
possible, but the traveler must get the approval of his em-
ployer and must have a certificate from the state bank ver-
ifying foreign currency to finance the trip.
EGYPTIAN PROTESTERS threw the city of Alexan-
dria into turmoil yesterday during an outburst of rioting.
Thousands of students and workers from the university
area spilled into the city's main squares and thoroughfares
where demonstrators attacked streetcars, smashed shop win-
dows and hurled stones at police cars. Travelers returning
from Egypt said several persons perished in the riot and
scores were injured.
The demonstrations began Thursday in the Nile River
delta town of Mansoura when students demanded a loosening
of new university regulations. The outbursts took on political
overtones however, when workers and non-students joined
the protests, demanding political liberties, freedom of ex-
pression and an end to press censorship.
Some Egyptian sources said non-student elements par-
ticipating in the demonstrations were probably members of
the outlawed Moslem Brotherhood and former wealthy land-
owners whose property has been confiscated by Nasser's re-
gime.
ITALIAN POLITICIANS yesterday moved closer to
establishing a new center-left majority government.
After the Socialist Party gave one of its members a man-
date to find out if a majority coalition could be set up, the
center-left Christian Democrats gave a vote of confidence to
their leader, Mariane Rumor, the probable choice for pre-
mier of the new government. Italy has had no government
since Giovanni Leone resigned last Tuesday as president.
The Christian Democrats also issued a communique say-
ing it was ready to join in a coalition which "should be form-
ed without delay." The Socialists, however, are not expected
to decide until today if they will return to the center-left.
* . .
THE WARSAW PACT MEMBERS open their annual
meeting today in Bucharest, Rumania.
The news agency Agerpress reported the main topic of
this year's talks will be an analysis of the "problems of com-
bat readiness."
Soviet Marshall Ivan Yakuoovsky, supreme commander
of pact forces will preside over the meeting which includes
representatives from the Soviet Union, Bulgaria, Czechoslo-
vakia, Poland and Rumania. Albania was a member, but re-
cently dropped out of the organization.
ANTI-GOVERNMENT demonstrations rocked Pak-
istan yesterday, aiming heavy criticism at President Ayub
Khan.
Opposition parties earlier had called for a national day
of protest mainly to demand political reforms and condemn
the arrests of opposition leaders. Demonstrations subsequent-
ly were reported in at l'east 19 cities where supporters of the
opposition, the Pakistan Democratic Movement, paraded and
shouted anti-government slogans.
More than 5,000 persons paraded in Lahore in one of the
largest public processions since Pakistan's independence in
1947. During the demonstrations there students set two buses
on fire and smashed the windows of more than 50 others.
HOPES OF RESCUING t h e 78 trapped miners in
Manninston, W. Va., were severely crippled yesterday af-
ter another mine explosion.
A small blast, the 13th in five days to rock the Mountain-
err Coal Co. mines hampered rescue workers from going into
the shafts and indicated the heart of the mine is still ablaze.
Mine officials said no rescue workers can be sent into the
shafts "as long as we have no assurance the fire is out." The
explosions began last Wednesday as the 99-man midnight
shift was about to quit work. Although 21 men either escaped
or were rescued, 78 miners are still trapped somewhere in the
mine, and little hope remains that they are still alive.
PRESIDENT-ELECT RICHARD NIXON yesterday ap-
pointed Herbert G. Klein to the newly created post of
"director of communications for the executive branch."
Klein, Nixon's longtime press secretary and former editor
of the San Diego Union, will coordinate public information

activities throughout the federal government, excluding only
the White House.
Nixon aides said the new job will aid the President-elect's
objectives of dispensing to the public all possible information
except that which would endanger national security.
MEXICAN STUDENTS yesterday made their first
move in four months toward renewed violence.
About 150 students comandeered a city bus near the In-
terior Ministry, evacuated all aboard, and drove it to an
unknown destination. Although one shot was heard, no in-
juries were reported.
Several demonstrations, all peaceful, have, taken place
since the October rioting, and earlier yesterday some students
of the National University returned to classes in response to
a request by university authorities. Students of prep, normal
and technical schools, however, remained on strike in Mexico
City, Puebla and Oaxaca.
Students have been striking in demand of a bigger say
in educational policies and to protest police invasion of their
campuses.
C ENJOY A DELICIOUS THANKSGIVING
0 DINNER WITH US. WE WILL BE
O SERVING FROM 3 P.M. to 1 A.M.,
A --T

West Germany, now the most
powerful economic force in Eur-
ope, does not want a conference
either - at least not at this time.
Elections are coming up next Oc-
tober and a change in the value
of the mark would hurt Chancellor
Kurt Kiesinger's government with
the voters.
He has vowed that he will not
revalue the mark upward, as oth-
er countries are urging him to do,
as long as he remains chancellor.

11

! '

OX EASTERN THATRE -
FOR VILLda6hE
375 No. MAPLE RD. "769.13OO

LAST TIME TODAY
"WEST SIDE STORY"
8:00 ONLY
STARTS TOMORROW

Andy Warhol'sI
THE NUDEREBSTAURANT
In Color!
Starring Viva & Taylot Mead (from Grosse Pointe)
"We were trying to make an anti-war movie and
made it into a nudie because we thought more
people would be able to see it. .,.
ALSO: Chapter One in the continuing story of:
"BUCK ROGERS" with Buster Crabbe
Mad Marvin presents:
Underground Films at the Vth Forum
5th Avenue at Liberty 761-9700
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, & Sunday: 1 1 P.M.
Separate Admission Required.

I

*O H

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MON.-FRI.-7:20, 9:30
SAT.-3:00, 5:15, 7:25, 9:30
SUN.-1 :00, 3:00, 5:15,
7:20, 9:30

D- uo
11 EMMINGs OGNA,
O~~~tlf~ yrics and Music by Bob Crewe and Charles fox.° Performed by fRCM ThE ES om T E RRY OAOA EUA RIERB
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rRIN IIIII M-ftf°M I II INt" Ohll1i'( 10,tIINI KI MMTURE AUDIEMCES

HANDEL'S
presented by the UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
IN HILL AUDITORIUM, ANN ARBOR
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 8:30 P.M.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 8:30 P.M.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2:30 P.M.

A

OW "

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