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November 24, 1968 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-24

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Sunday, November 24, 1968

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

The renting season:
A word to the wise

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
..S..%..r

(Continued from page 1)
management companies. "Harass-
ment will get them on the ball,"
says SHA Vice Chairman Mike
Materna. *
The University's Off-Campus
Housing Bureau, and, as a last
resart, legal action are the next
steps.
In ever increasing numbers stu-
dents are bringing complaints to
the Off-Campus Housing Bureau
and SHA. This semster the bureau
has handled 173 officially recorded

complaints and advised
other parties in ani
capacity.

about 75
unofficial

astounded
byDeGaulle
(Continued from page 1)
financial ministers of the fre
world's 10 richest nations who me
last week in Bonn.
He implied the meeting ha
produced some sort of a packai
deal in granting France a $2 bi
lion credit support for the fran
and that France was expectedt
do something in return.
"But," he said, "now that th
French have decided against de
valuation, we may save $600 mil
lion;" the amount which We:
Gerlany was to contribute to tU
credit..
Sources in the Netherlands an
Britain, however, indicated tb
credits would not be withdraw
despite De Gaulle's decision.
Private bankers were skeptic
whether any possible restrictior
on the French money mark(
could effectively halt the flightc
francs abroad in further specula
tion that devaluation eventual
would come.
"No one will be really convince
that France will not devalue
the future," said Paul Jeanty,
director of Samuel Montague Co
Ltd., one of Britains leading mei
chant banks.
A number of foreign exchan@
dealers, the men who handle th
money for the speculators, agree
with British officials that th
British government's austerit
measures would protect the poun
for the time being.
In the United States, economist
agreed that the French presider
might be able to defend the fray
against devaluation but felt
would take severe austerity mea
ures in the French economy.
William F. Butler, vice prey
dent and director of economic re
search, Chase Manhattan Ban]
New 'York, said "the policies h
will have to take would definite)
cause a significant rise in uner
ployment in France."
The world's bankers were nc
the=only ones caught off guard b
the announcement.
In New York the French Tra'
Shows Office, a division of th
French' Chamber of Commerce
the United States, issued a state
mieat before the announcemer
saying that "as a result of France
decision to devalue the franc bot
industrial and consumer gooc
imported from France will becom
more competitively priced."

This represents a significant in-
crease over last year.
SHA has been channeling most
of the complaints it receives to
the bureau's mediation service.
Landlords appear receptive to Uni-
versity mediation.
Summit Associates credits the
bureau's mediation and model
lease services with helping to fos-
ter good tenant-landlord relation-
ships. Many other management
companies feature their use of the
mediation service as a selling
point in their rental pitch.
Elizabeth Leslie, chairman of the
bureau's mediation service stresses
that the service's staff, which in-
cludes public health and legal ad-
visors, is really for negotiation, not
formal mediation.
"It's not a tool, you can use
with uncooperative people," she
says. "There is a lot of give and
take and we have to instill that
kind of feeling in the disputants."
Mrs. Leslie says the chief value
of the mediation service is that
the landlord and tenant "arrive at
the decision themselves. We don't
want the authoritarian angle to
slip in."
Although the mediation service
does have legal advisors, it doesn't
dispense legal advice to students,
but sends those who request it to
SGC lawyers.
Many students, either dissatis-
fied with or unaware of SHA and
University services, instigate their
own independent rent to stockes
to nudge landlords into fairer
treatment. This technique, though
often successful, can be costly to
* students in the form of late rental
payment charges applied to the
damage deposit if they haven't
i protected themselves in the lease.
Making your
own way in
academia
(Continued from page 1)
their program fir'st with a coun-
selor in their sophomore year. The
. committee would then be able to
aprove the program before the
student is a junior.
Next year the committee hopes
to invite two students to serve on
it. The committee hopes then to
tformulate a set of ground rules
for individualsconcentration pro-
grams.
Tikofsky says the programj
places the responsibility for ed-
ucation squarely on the student's
shoulders.
Only a few students have ap-
proached the committe this year.
But Tikofsky thinks this is be-
cause the program is only three
months old. He anticipates many
more requests for individual pro-
grams in the future.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L.S.&A. Bldg. before 2
p.m. of the day preceding publi-
cation and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. General No-
tices may be published a maximum
of two times on request; Day Cal-
endar items appear only once. Stu-
dent organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24"
Day Calendar
Choral Union Series: Yehudi Menu-
hin, Violinist; Hephzibah Menuhin,
Pianist. Hill Auditorium, 2:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Ginger Zyskowski,
Percussion: School of Music Recital
Hall, 2:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Melvin Harsch, Trum-
pet: School of Music Recital Hall, 4:30
p.m.
Cinema Guild: House Committee on
Un-American Activities' Operation
Abolition: Architecture Auditorium,
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
University Activities Center: Contro-
versy '68: J. William Fulbright, Chair-
man, Senate Committee on Foreign Re-
lations, "War . . . Here and Abroad":
Hill Auditorium. 8:00 p.m.
Degree Recital: Frank Wiens, Piano:
School of Music Recital, 8:00 p.m.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25
School of Public Health Assembly:
Dr. Benjamin Viel, School of Medicine,
University of Chile, "The Demographic
Future of Latin America": Auditorium,
School of Public Health, 4:00 p.m.
Computer, Information and Control
Engineering Seminar: Prof. G. Kallian-
pur, Institute of Technology, School
of Mathematics, University of Minne-
sota, 1504 E. Eng., 4:00 p.m.
Basketball: Varsity - Frosh Game:
University Events Building, 8:00 p.m.
Degree Recital: John Burkett, Or-
gan: Hill Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
Opera: Puccini's La Boheme: Joseph
Batt, Conductor; Ralph Herbert, Stage
Director; Lydia Mendelssohn Theater,
8:00 p m
General Notices
Broadcasting Service: WUOM Radio
(91.7 Me.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily;
Sunday 12 Noon to 6 p.m.
Sunday 2:00 p.m. Cleveland Orchestra
Concert, George Szel conductor. Mo-
zart, Wagner. 4:00 p.m. Ernest Bloch:
The Man and His Music.
Monday 11:00 a.m. The Eleventh Hour
(repeated at 7 p.m.) Ed Burrows hosts
an hour of news and conversation
about the arts and literature. Guests:
Rev. Malcolm Boyd; Waldie and aPt
Rev. Malcolm Boyd; Waldie and Pat
Anderson of the Interlochen Arts Aca-
demy. Monday 1:00 p.m. The Yale Silli-
man Lectures: "Error, Progress, and the
Concept of Time", with rPof. Jacob
Bronowski, from the series on "The
Origin of Knowledge and Imagination".
Monday 5:00 Calendar of Area Events.
5:15 p.m. Law In The News, with Prof.
Joseph R. Julin.
Dr. Ronald Freedman, Director of
the University of Michigan Population
Studies Center will lead a discussion
on "Opportunities for Fellowship Sup-
port and Later Careers in Population
Studies" at 4:15 on November 25 in the
Assembly Hall of the Rackhamn Bldg.
This is pertinent for seniors and first
year graduate students in sociology,
economics, mathematics, zoology, na-
tural resources and related fields.
Center for Russian and East Euro-
pean Studies Lecture: R. V. Burks,
Dept. of History, Wayne State Univer-
sity and Social Science Dept., The
Rand Corp, "The Future of Eastern
Europe," Room 200 Lane Hall, Tuesday,
November 26, 4:10 p.m.
UNIVERSITY SENATE MEETING
Monday, November 25, 1968 at 4:00 p.m.
The regular fall meeting of the Uni-
versity Senate will he held Monday.
I - d

November 25, at 4:00 p.m. in Rackham
Lecture Hall. The agenda is as follows:
1. Consideration of the minutes of
the regular Senate meeting of April 15,
1968. 2. Report from President Fleming
on Current Matters. 3. Vice President
Ross, remarks. 4. Report of the As-
sembly's Committee on the Proper Role
of the University of Michigan in the
Educational System of the State. Wil-
liam E. Brown, Jr. 5. Report of the
Senae Advisory Committee on Uuniver-
sity Affairs on its role as advisory to
the President - Irving M. Copi. 6. Mo-
tion to amend Article I, Section 4(2) of
the Rules of the University Senate,
Senate Assembly, and Senate Advisory
Committee on University Affairs. 7.
Faculty Salaries - Report by W. Kaplan.
8. Old and new business. 9. Discussion
from the floor.
The Vice Presidents of the Univer-
sity are invited to attend the Sen-
ate meeting to discuss matters of con-3
cern to the University community.
SGC will debate and vote on the fol-
lowing motions on December 5, 1968 in
room 3540 S.A.B. Interested persons are
invited to participate in the debate per-
1sonally, by petition, or by some other
means.
* * *
MOVE: To amend the SGC Plan by
adding the following Article:
A. The Central Participant Assem-
bly shall give every student a chance
to participate in the formulation of
his government's policy on any issue
of concern to him and shall provide an
arena for public debate of, and cry-
stalization of opinion on, the issues
of the day.
B. The Assembly shall consist of a
Chairman, a iVce Chairman, Organi-
zation Representatives ,and Consti-
tuent Members.
1. The chairman and iVce-Chair-
man shall be elected as a slate from
the campus at large by a majority
vote (according to the single trans-
ferable ballot) at the rugularly-
scheduled fall election. Should there
be a tie, the winning slate shall be
I chosen ,by lot from, among the
slates tied for first place. The Chair-
man and Vice-Chairman shall serve,
for one year and until their succes-

sors are elected. Neither shall serve
as an officer of SOC during his term
of office in the Assembly.
2. Any recognized student organ-
ization, representative student or-
ganization of a school or college,
or organized living unit, may elect
an Organization Representative to
the Assembly. Each Organization
Representative shall serve at the
pleasure of his electing organiza-
tion.
3. Any student wishing to raise
an issue in the Assembly, or inter-
ested in an issue to be debated by
the Assembly, may become a Con-
stituent Member by indicating at
the opening of the approprnate As-
sembly meeting, or at some other
time provided for in the Procedures
of the Assembly, his desire to par-
ticipate. The Assembly shall make
no distinction, in rights or obli-
gations, between Organization Re-
presentatives and Constituent Mem-
bers.
C. The Chairman shall preside at
meetings of the Assembly, shall be the
chief administrative officer of the As-
sembly, and shall be ex officio a full
member of SGC. The Vice-Chairman
shall preside at meetings of the As-
sembly in the absence of the Chair-
man, shall assist the Chairman in his
duties, and shall succeed to the Chair-
manship should that office become va-
cant. Should the Vice-Chairmanship
become vacant simultaneously, the As-
sembly shall fill the vacancy or va-
cancies by election from among its
members.
D. The Assembly may debate any
issue raised by a member, conduct
such hearing or investigations as may
be deemed appropriate, pass a resolu-
tion on any matter it has debated, and
petition or otherwise organize for the
enactment of any policy upon which it
has resolved; may organize local par-
ticipant assemblies for the several
schools and colleges, for the organi-
zed living units, and for any other
unit o fdecision-making in the Uni-
versity; and may adopt such rules of
procedure, and establish such assembly
officers or committees, as may from
time to time be deemed appropriate.
E. The Assembly shall provide for
regular meetings; shall publish, in the
Daily Official Bulletin, prior public
notice of the time, place, and agenda
of each meting; and shall publish, in
the Daily Official Bulletin, the full text
of all resolutions passed.
Move: To approve the new Block
Ticket Policy.

Move: That Council assign two Coun- Differences in Selected Urban Areas." Division, please stop in and let us pro-
ell members to each of the six major on Monday, November 25 at 3 p.m. in vide you with the proper materials.
dormitories (Bursley, Markley, Alice Conference Room, Population Studies Plea-e call 763-1363 to make appoint-
Lloyd, South, West and East Quads) Center. 1225 So. Univ., Chairman: E. O. .nmes by phone, or stop in and make
for the purpose of becoming sensitive Laumann. appt. iii persen. Make appts, as soon
to student needs. helping students or- as possible. none accepted after 4 p.m.
ganize around issues of concern to fl A.:ay preceding visit. 4
them, and building a political base. - -- --- -L
Move: That SGC Allocate $100 for NO INTERVIEWS IIELD AT
National Primary as a function of the GENERAL DIVISiON PLACEMENT SERVICES
National Student Lobby. 3200 S.A.B. T'IlE WEEK OF NOVEMBER, 25
Move: That SGC allocate $250 to~~
establish a Student Lobby to be ad- Placement Interviews: '1Ie following 'TESDAY AN WEDNESDAY,
ministered by a set of resource people organizations will interview at Place.1DECEMBER 3 and 4, 1968
to direct activities in the fields of: ment Services, the representatives ex- US Einformation AencyWashing-
1. Finances pect to see at least a vita sheet on in-!tsDCnGo m etingsfy, alhIn-
2. Demonstrations terviewees, therefore, if you are not ton D.C.. Group meetings for all in
3. Communications atready registered with the Generali (Continued on Page 3)
4. National links ~
5. General Coordinator, --- -
and to be selected by a general peti-
tioning procedure to SGC, for the basic Pre-Exams
purpose of providing the student body
with a viable mechanism to act ef-
fectively on issues relevant to it.Publishe'sRe d
Move: That SGC approve the revised u
Draft of Policies Governing StudentB O O K
Records (of the Office of S t u d e n t
Doctoral CONTINUES AT
Examinations
Kenneth Morgan, Human Genetics, State Street at North University
Dissertation:"The Genetic Demography~~
of a Small Navajo Community,"; on_®--
Monday, November 25 at 8:30 a.m, in------
Room 301 Special Projects Research
Bldg., Chairman: J. N. Spuhler.
Robert Walter Haessler, Industrial--Next-
Engineering, Dissertation: "An applica- NO 2-6264
tion of Heuristic Programming to a BA BARELLA
Nonlinear Cutting Stock Problem Oc-
curring in the Paper Industry," on
Monday, November 25 at 9 a.m. in 214 _____
West Engineering, Chairman: R. C.
Wilson. SHOWS
William Sammuel Pooler, Sociology.,____
Dissertation: "The Relevance of the AT
Central City-Suburban Distinction: An
Examination of Social Participation 7-10 92
1-3-5
EROS FESTIVAL NO. 1
UNDERGROUND
at the Vth Forum 6th
THUR. thru SUN.- 1 :00 P.M. W EEK
NEXT WEEK
ANDY WARHOL'S ~_~
"NUDE RESTAURANT" ca -
Topless anti-war filmc/
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION a 1b isnt
FOXEAQTFRN i

EUROPE ON ZERO $ PER DAY
If you are looking for a low cost, living and learning
experience in Europe this summer or year-round, visit
the I STC/ISISrepresentative for information and appli-
cations on November 25 and 26. Group meeting for ques-.
tions and answers will be held on November 25 and 26 at
SA.B. in Room 3516 from 5 to 6, and 7 to 8. The repre-
sentative will also be available during the day in S.A.B.
212

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ENDS TUESDAY
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MIRISCH PICTURES presents
STARTS WEDNESDAY

I

THE
LIVING THEATER
MYSTERIES AND SMALLER PIECES
8:30 p.m., Thursday, December 12, 1968
.A slow recall into a world where theater makes
its own images, unreproducable in any other medium.
-Village Voice
ANTIG©N E
8:30 p.m., Friday, December 13, 1968
"Antigone" makes theatrical history with its fierce
totality of commitment. It is beyond theater.
-Saturday Review
FRANKENSTEI N
8:30 p.m., Saturday, December 14, 1968
... the most original, powerful and fascinating
piece of theater in the country.
-Newsweek
DETROIT INSTITUTE OF ARTS AUDITORIUM
All seats reserved Tickets at Hudsons, Grinnells, Wayne State Uni-
$4.50, $3.50 versity Ticket Office, Institute Ticket Office.
MAIL ORDERS NOW: Send stamped, self-addressed envelope to Ticket
Office, Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan 48202.
Presented by: UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR A6ULT EDUCATION and
THEATER ARTS DEPARTMENT of the DETROIT INSTITUTE OF
ARTS.

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CONNERY-*'
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3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor

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" " :>=s<::= Program information 8-6416
in on.
outrageous
bedroom romp
VP~aloaded with
2.0 S - suspicious wives,
. flirtatious friends,
amorous husbands;
outraged lovers
~ / and the
/ rFrench Cavalry!
SUCGGSTEb
FOR MATURE
Panavision '"Color by DeLuxe nAUOIECES,

f

miiad marvin is sexy!

SAMY m
E, PEPPED'
SCOLOR ly I tuxe
Uiteld Arits

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''": c.
tir: '
:. ,::
.:
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Mad Marvin presents:
Underground Films at The Vth Forum
5th Avenue at Liberty 761-9700
Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday: 11 p.m.
Separate admission required.
EROS FILM PROGRAM I
Seven provocative Films." Wilson Lindsey, Det. Free Press
PORTRAIT OF A GIRL by John Bale.
SONG by Ron Taylor.
Matte by Ron Taylor.
LOVE AMONGTHE CHRISTIANS.
VIBR~ANT NUDE.
MY POLISH GIRL.

TECHNICOLOR~i

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r
r

i

REMEMBER
COURSE EVALUATION

1 11

va

J

presents
(gloryosky, Zero!) DAVID ACKLES
Electra Recording Artist
songwriter - singer
This afternoon 2:00 P.M.- Doors open 8 p.m.
$1.00. LARRY AUSTIN, TONIGHT $1.50
Prof. of Music U-Cal.-Do-I
vis, presents two original FREE EATS
compositions - "The Ma- 330 Maynard St.
gicians" and "Accidents."Yes

Bring 2 no. 2 PENCILS Tomorrow

"AN ICE-COLD WARNIND
OF INSIDIOUS YOUNG
EVILtTRIUMPHANT...
EMPHATICALLYJOLTING t
- Howard Ihoapon, N. Y. Te"
"POWERFUL!
IT SHOULD PROBABLY BE
LIMITED TO A MATURE,
SERIOUS-MINDED AUDIENCEr"
- Ach sr wb t, Nra . Y. Pc

oil

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i-

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t

I

It

"SHOCKING ! f
A VIOLENT AND ADMITTEDLY
SHOCKING FILM; WE GO
BEYOND HOMOSEXUALITY INTO

REMEMBER

-. i

m..

II

I

. . ... ..
.. Y,. :: ., ........

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