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November 16, 1968 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-16

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Page Si-

THE MICHIGAN DAILl

5ntijrcinv Nnvomkoe 14 1 QAJQ

Page Si> THE MICHIGAN DAILY

autuluuy., i.Nuv :T oer Io, i,7Fo 5

Michigan frosh dominate ToledoMaior Dowers try to Cure

bowl fever

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as defense keeps Rockets on pad
By JOE MARKER why many of the shivering gather- quick personal foul penalties (ac-
The Michigan freshman football ing were not electrified by the counting for 30 of the 107 penalty
team squeezed out a 12-7 verdict early play. Michigan rushed 22 yards stepped off against Michi-
over Toledo. last night' at Ann times for 54 yards, a 2.4 average, gan) moved the Rockets to the
Arbor's Holloway Field in a game while Toledo/lost one yard in 17 Michigan 24. Then, in what may
unexpectedly dominated by the attempts. have been the key play of the
two defensive units. The most exciting play other game, Tom Darden intercepted
than the touchdown came on a for the Wolverines and Toledo had
The Michigandefense so con- 49-yard field goal attempt by the made its last threat till its 1 a s t
trolled the game that Toledo, Wolverines' Dana Coin, which was minute score.
which had averaged 42 points a long enough but barely wide to the The huge Michigan defensive
board until the final 16 seconds of right. This made it all the more front four, John Cilluffo (205),
boar uie fincredible that he missed the point Fred Grambau (250), Tom Beck-
the game, after the first touchdown. man (245), and Alden Carpenter
The first half was a tense, near- Toledo, however, came out of (203), took command of the game
ly scoreless struggle, with neither the dressing room unwilling to from that point and late in the
team able to generate any sem- play dead for the Wolverines in third quarter pushed Toledo back
blance of a sustained drive. The the third stanza. The Rockets had to its 16 yard line.
only score came on a lightning- been plagued by bad field posi- Here an aborted Rocket punt
like touchdown strike from Mich- tion all evening; frequently taking provided comic relief for the
igan quarterback Dennis Connell possession of the ball within their crowd. Lee Goodman, backed up
to Glen Doughty that covered 42 twenty yard line. into his own end zone, decided to

By HANK LOWENTHAL
Watch out, it's spreading! Bowl
fever, dormant early in the sea-
son, is quickly rising to its annual
height as the top teams close out
their schedule. It has struck all
over the country, from Texas to
Alabama, and Southern Califor-
nia to Oregon State. The cure
for the delirium brought on by
this fall disease never fails: a
piece of cotton, a bit of orange,
a pinch of sugar, and lots of roses.
In Los Angeles this week, the
smell of roses is stirring on the co-
leaders in the Pacific Eight, top-
rated Southern Cal and Oregon!
State.
Last week the Trojans faced a
tough and highly praised Califor-
nia defense. The game was touted1

as a confrontation between this
defense and all-everything, O. J.
Simpson. It was no match. O. J.
gained one-hundred and sixty-
four yards against a line that had
yielded an average of only ninety
point one yards per game. In-
cluded in Simpson's yardage were
touchdown jaunts of seven and
thirty-nine yards.
An important cog in the power-
ful USC offense but overshadowed
by the exploits of Simpson, has
been quarterback Steve Sogge.
Against California last week, he
completed 10 passes, including
three for touchdowns as the Tro-
jans won easily 35-17.
The key to an OSU victory on
Saturday will depend on their
own All-American candidate, Bill

yards with only u minutes ilt- I
Connell spotted him when he
was about five yards behind the
last Toledo defender. and -led him
with a perfectly thrown aerial that
marked the only scoring of the
half and gave the Wolverines a 6-0
advantage..
Toledo's best first-half chance
came on its initial turn with the
ball. The R ckets had recovered
a Michigan fumble on their own
47 and moved to the 25 on Chuck
Ealey passes before being thwart
-ed.\
Simple statistics will illustrate,

i y - - W%..Or I-ow Ann- 4 mw %-Of Isollm JIL %-/

They returned the second-half
kickoff to the thirty-five and put
together their first sustained drive.
They quickly moved through the
Michigan line tosthe Wolverines'
42 and then received a big break
on a pass interference call at the
15. They couldn't capitalize,
though, as on second down
Doughty stepped in front of the
the intended receiver to steal an
Ealey aerial..
Toledo then stopped Michigan
cold and four plays later put the
ball in play on their own 45, again
in excellent field position. Two

pass rather than punt, but chang-
ed his mind at the last moment,
and kicked a line drive which
smacked one'of his linemen in the
head for a minus four yard kick.
Michigan took advantage of the
break by throwing an interception
on the first play.
Getting down to business early
in the final stanza,dthe Wolverine
frosh rolled 58 yards in ten plays
to effectively put the game out of
reach. Bruce Elliott used the roll-
out to move to the one yard line,
where Dave Zuccarelli crashed
over for the clincher.
The final twelve minutes werer

Basketball ticket information
Season Basketball tickets for Michigan Students will go
on sale Tuesday, November'19 at 8:30 A.M. These are priced at
six dollars for a Season Reserved Seat. There are twelve home
games.
The Student tickets will be distributed on the same Priority
basis as in Football as follows: -
Priority No. 4 - Tuesday 8:30 A.M. to 12:30 P.M.
Priority No. 3 - Tuesday 12:30 P.M. to 5 P.M.
Priority No. 2 - Wednesday 8:30 A.M. to 12:30 P.M.
Priority No. 1 - Wednesday 12:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Your I.D. Card indicates the first year of registration and
the priority is as follows:
Priority No. 4 will have a 5 or less
Priority No. 3 will have a 6
Priority No. 2 will have three registration letters imprinted.
Priority No. 1 will have one registration letter imprinted.
These numbers are at the right of your Student number.
A Student may pick up four tickets with four I.D.'s with
the proper Priority number.
Students with various priorities, who wish to sit together,
should pick up tickets at time shown for-lowest priority of group.
Please have your check made out to the Michigan Ticket
Department for the proper amount and your address thereon.
Student Distribution will be at the main entrance to the
Athletic Administration Building. The front doors will be marked
to indicate the proper group.

f Enyart. A large, rambling full-
back, Enyart is currently fourth
in the nation in rushing, having
already surpassed the one thous-
l and yard mark.
With wingback Billy Main shar-
ing the rushing chores, the Bea-
vers overwhelmed an ever-danger-
ous UCLA eleven last Saturday,
45-21.
So today's game shapes up as
the championship for the Pacific
Eight conference. Unless OSU is
somehow able to stop Simpson
(maybe by breaking his leg in the
first quarter), they will probably
be the Trojans eighth straight vic-
tim in their run for the roses and
a second straight national cham-
pionship.
In Birmingham, Alabama, an-
other possible conference cham-
pion could be decided when Au-
burn hosts fifth ranked Georgia.
Both teams, undefeated in the
SEC, had impressive wins last
week.
Led by sophomore quarterback
Mike Cavan, the Bulldogs routed
Florida, 51-0. Auburn pulled the
upset of the year in downing pre-
viously unbeaten Tennessee, 28-14.
A victory here for either would
solidify a Bowl bid. Look out for
an Auburn upset, though.
The top game in the Southwest
conference pits two of the four
teams tied for first, Arkansas and
SMU. This game should be typi-
cal of many college games this
year, a showcase for the offensive
units.
Two of the top sophomore quar-
terbacks in the country will be
featured in this contest. SMU's
Chuck Hixon, throwing aerial
bombs to All-American Jerry Le-I
vias, has led the ,country in bothI
passing and total offensive yard-{
age from the outset of the season.
Arkansas' soph sensation Bill
Montgomery has alreadyibroken
their single season total offensive
yardage record of sixteen-hundred
and twenty-two yards.
There will be many points1

YOUNG AMERICANS FOR FREEDOM
MEETING
SUNDAY, NOV. 17
3:00 P.M. Room 3B-Union
Future plans, psychological questionaires
Second newspaper

mere formality.
M
FIRST DOWNS
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
TOTAL NO. RUSHES
NET YARDS-
Rushing
Passing
FORWARD PASSES
ATTEMPTED
Cozy pleted
Intercepted by
Yds. interceptions re
TOTAL PLAYS
(Rushes and Passes)
PUNTS, No.
Average Distance
KICKOFFS,
returned by
YARDS KICKS
RETURNED
Punts
Kickoffs
FUMBLES, Number
Ball lost by
PENALTIES, Number
Yards penalized

ichigan Opponent
16 19
11 16
4 11
1, 2
51 39
169 70
125 185
20 41
8 16
2 1
'.24 0
71 70
7 8
40.9 28.7
2 3

t

O. J. SIMPSON, Southern Cal's All-American halfback and Heis-
man Trophy candidate, is down a4d out on this play, but it is not
a position in which the 'rojan star is often found. Simpson is\
currently number two in he country in both rushing and scoring,
and is the man that Oregon State must stop today in the big
battle on the west coast. A victory for either team should send
the winner to Pasadena on New Year's day to face the Big Ten,
champion.
racked up in this battle, but Ar- Kwalick, a powerful backfield of
kansas should account for most halfbacks Charlie Pittman and
of them. Bob Campbell, and a hustling de-
The Missouri-Oklahoma strug-? fense, they impressed Miami coach
gle will be a battle between two of Charlie Tate so much that he
the top defensive units in the was prompted to comment, "This
country. Missouri, currently rank- is the best team we've faced, bet-
ed sixth in the nation,, will have ter than USC."
its hands full against the always In a traditional clash at Yale
potent Oklahoma offense. This Bowl in New Haven today, Yale
will be a close game, and could meets Princeton. The Bulldogs,
go either way, ktied with Harvard for first in the
Of the major independents, Ivy League, are led by quarterback
Penn St. and Notre Dame should Briah Dowling, fullback Calvin
coast to easy victories today. Hill, and one of the top defenses
Many observers feel that the in the country. Princeton is having
Nittany Lions might possibly have one of it's poorer seasons and
the best team in the country. Led should not be able to handle this
by All-American tight end Ted top Yale eleven.

4

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92
60
32
4
1
8
107

67
6
61
3
2
4
20

PRO BASKETBALL:
Leaders win on clutch buckets
By The Associated Press The Celtics has seven players in phia before fouling out late in the
BOSTON-Boston's Bill Russell double figures, topped by Bailey fourth period.
broke a tie with a three-point play Howell with 27 points. Lou Hudson led Atlanta with 26
* * * points. Walt Hazzard had 21.
in the closing seconds of the third IF F*1 *

I

a

I

MBA 's
Dear MBA Students:
In the November, 1968 edition of MBA magazine,
you will find a RE-CON-MBA Candidate Ques-
tionnaire for you ,to fill out, as well as its
counterpart for Employers, the RE-CON Job
Specification (Input) form.
Whether or not you are looking for permanent
employment, we would like you-to be a RE-CON
representative-and receive compensation for
your time and efforts.
Simply make the Job Specifications form
available to any company considering employment
of an MBA next spring. Just make sure you
identify yourself as the RE-CON representative
by inserting your name and address in the
appropriate space on the back page of the Job
Specification Form.

period and the Celtics exploded
for 10 straight points at the out-
set of the fourth quarter l a s t
night rolling to a 116-105 National
Basketball Association victory over
the Cincinnati Royals.
With reserve Don Nelson scoring
13 of his 21 points in the final 12
minutes, the Celtics built a 20-
point lead and breezed to their
ninth victory in 12 starts.
Ft ~

Hawks clipped
ATLANTA - Billy Cunningham
tossed in two free throws with two
seconds left to give the Philadel-
phia 76ers a 116-115 National Bas-
ketball Association victory over
the Atlanta Hawks last night.
Cunningham was the game's
leading scorer with 27 points, Luc-
ius Jackson had 23 for Philadel-

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Bullets explode
BALTIMORE -'the Baltimore
Bullets went on a scoring ram-
page at the end of the third quar-
ter, and start of the fourth and
broke open a tight game for a 129
102 route over Milwaukee in a
National Basketball Association
game last night.
Gus Johnson led the Bullets
with 28 points and the league's
leading scorer, Earl Monroe, 25.
Pipers fly
MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL-
Connie Hawkins stuffed in 35
points and grabbed 20 rebounds
to spark the Minnesota Pipers'to
a 105-95 American Basketball As-
sociation victory over the Indiana
Pacers, playing their first game
under, new Coach Bob Leonard.
Hawkins scored the baskets at
the start of the fourth period that
snapped a76-76 tie and sent the
Pipers ahead for good. He also
blocked five shots in winning his
first battle against Indiana's big
man, Mel Daniels who had 14 re-
bounds but only 12 points.
THE EXAM SECRET
* MSUCCESSFUL
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.< FOR
PASSING
EXAMS-

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For additional
CORP., or call

Daily-Peter Dreyfuss
Happiness is rugby
Michigan rugger. Pete Mildner grabs the ball earlier this
season. Champs in the Southwest Ontario Unioh with a 6-2 re-
cord, Michigan is still undefeated in Big Ten competition. To-
day's meeting with Wisconsin ('B' game at 11:30 p.m.; 'A' game at
3:30 p.m.) is the last real stumbling block to that goal, despite
next week's game with Ohio State. A third game will also be play-
ed at 5 this afternoon against the- Borderers from Windsor.

information, write to RE-CON
collect 212-687-2090.

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STUDENT NEW DEMOCRATIC
COALITION
tvill meet Sun., Nov. 17
2:30 Room 3R Union
Those willing to work, please come

SR

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11

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IF,

* Volunteer Service
" Israel Universities
* Language Study
* Kibbutz Summer

AN INFORMATIVE CONFERENCE ON
ALL OPPORTUNITIES TO TOUR, STUDY,
WORK AND LOVE ISRAEL.
DR. DAVID GUTMANN, U. of M. DEPT.
OF PSYCHOLOGY, WILL SPEAK ON:
,"ISRAEL: PRECONCEPTIONS
AND REALITY"
Resource people and materials will be made available
individually and in workshops.

T ER | S7l S M
UNION-LEAGUE THERE IS STILL UNION-LEAGUE
EUROPEAN CHARTER FLIGHTS
FLIGHT 1 May 4 DETROIT-LONDON Sabena
June 1 BRUSSELS-DETROIT
FLIGHT 2 May 8 NEW YORK-LONDON Sabena
Aug. 17 BRUSSELS-NEWYORK
FLIGHT 3 - June 29 NEWYORK-LONDON Pan Am
IIAuI 14 PARIS-NJW YORK

ENGINEERS

A representative from the Jervis

B.

Webb Company will be on Campus No-
vember 18, 1968.
Graduating Students - Opportunities are
excellent for those who desire a career in

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the Material Handling

Industry and are

interested in diversification of training in all
product areas-from designing to wherever

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