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November 15, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-15

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Friday, November 15,' 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, November 15, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

NATINAL rNIGAJ. ORPOATIO

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATMN
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HARDSHIPS BOTH WAYS

"

UNI
EDITOR'S NOTE: It's the Ii
states in the United Nations V
are providing many of the big
biems. Under the one-state-o
vote system in the United Nati
a country the size of Pueblo, C
wields as much power in the G4
eral Assembly as the Soviet Un
what to do about the ministate
the United Nations is becomin
globai-sized headache.
By TOM HOGE
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.
-Some members call t]
overgrown villages, but
United Nations continues tof
to its alphabet soup of mi
states who wield the samev
as the great powers in the C
eral Assembly.
In U'.N. language, a mic
state is any nation with a p
ulation under one million,
some fall far short even of t
level.
For example, the Maldive
lands, which uses a stampc
lectors' society for its New Y
address, has 97,000 people, ba
ly matching the toal citize
of Columbia, S.C.
Other vest-pocket memt
include Iceland, a land of 1
000 which has been in the U
ed Nations since 1946, and G
bia, a strip of land in V
Africa inhabited by 330,000 p
ple.

." .#
mirnisttes
ittle sembly from its original 51 lion pe
phot members to 125. nations,
ne- The influx of Lilliputian can- than 37
ons, didates eager to acquire the Thei
olo., prestige and protection of U.N. tary of
ion, membership has concerned Sec- that itR
s in ret cy-General U Thant, who for a
g a suggested frrat the tiualifica- the Ge:
tions for admission be re-ex- formed1
amined. Thant's suggestion has per cen
(AP). won support from the United tion."
hem States, France and a number of Granti
the other larger nations, small n
add "It appears desirable," said ships b
cro- Thant, "that a distinction be The r
vote made between the rights to in- cent, lev
len- dependence and the question of member,
full membership in the United $40,000.
ros- Nations." for a bi
op- He argued that U.N. member- stantial
but ship might "impose obligations member
that which are too onerous for the with a
microstates and also may lead 240,000,
Is- to a weakening of the United meansr
col- Nations." dues th
(ork The nearly two dozen mini- Thed
are- powers already in the United ning. T
enry Nations pay altogether little mission
more than half of 1 per cent urbs ma
bers of the U.N. annual budget. By amount
90,- contrast, the United States alone ,.instanc
nit- pays more than 30 -per cent of 319,
am- each year, and the Soviet Union spends
West runs second with an assessment on due
peo- of more than 17 per cent. Yet internal
all have the same-sized vote in probably
born the assembly even though more related
has than half of the 125 members On th,
as- have -smaller populations than the Ge]
New York City. ready i
One student of U.N. affairs sions,c
figured out that under this make w
set-up, the 19 smaller member African
states totalling about four mil- addition
lion people have the same bal- crisis.
lot strength as nearly 1.5 bil- The o

wield

big

power

R
i
1
a
,
1X

ople in the 10 largest
or a disparity of more
71 to 1.
inequity caused Secre-
State Dean Rusk to note
was theoretically possible
"two-thirds majority in
neral Assembly to be
by nations with only 10
t of the world's popula-
ng membership to a
nation can work hard-
oth ways.
minimum dues of .04 per
vied against the smallest
rs amount to about
This may be petty cash
g power, but it is a sub-
sum to the less affluent
's. And for any nation
'population of less than
the minimum levy
paying higher per capita
an the United States.
dues are only the begin-
o set up and maintain a
in New York or its sub-
ay run many times the
of the assessment. For
e, Malta, an island state
000 people, reportedly
about $150,000 a year
s and contributions to
tional organizations and
y another $150,000, on
administrative costs.
he other side of the coin.
neral Assembly hall al-
s jampacked during ses-
despite alterations to
way for the parade of
fledglings. A few more
ns could cause a minor
ne-nation, one-vote sys -

-Associated Press
U' B graducae honored
Dr. Paul B. Cornely, '34 Public Health, was named president-

The rising tide of newb
states in Asia and Africa
swelled membership in the

H ILLEL
APPENINGS
TONIGHT AT 8 P.M.-
JOINT HILLEL-BETH ISRAEL SERVICE
PROF. PAUL GLASSER, School of Social Work
will speak on
"Religion and the Family"
THE HILLEL CHOIR WILL PARTICIPATE
Sunday at 6 p.m.: Deli House
I HILLEL FOUNDATION 1429 HILL S

T.

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY
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2

elect of the American Public
Detroit.
tem has spawned a host of crit-
ics who insist that the African
group which now totals 40 na-
tions may one day -ontrol the
General Assembly.
Theoretically, the Africans,
particularly with support of
their two dozen Asian col-
leagues, could by sheer weight
of numbers make or break any
proposal before the assembly.
In actuality, the group, whose
members run the political spec-
trum, is badly fragmented on
nearly everything except colo -
nial problems and the related
race questions. On such matters,
the Africans and Asians close
ranks with results that are
sometimes startling.
A few years ago, Eric Louw,
then foreign minister of South
Africa asserted in the course of
a policy speech before the as-
sembly that South African
blacks enjoyed a higher stand-
ard of living than many of the
African members who attacked
his government's racial oolicies.
The statement so infuriated
the Africans that they rammcd
through an unprecedented reso-
lution reprimanding Louw for
making the utterance. i
The Africans flexed their
muscles again in 1965. They
overturned a long-standing two-
thirds vote requirement by
steamrolling a decision through
the assembly that a simple ma -
jority was enough to adopt a
resolution calling for removal
of military bases from nonself-
governing territories. This
strong demonstration prompted
then U.S. Ambassador Arthur j.
Faculty, Staff and
Grad Students
(no dotes)
TIME FOR
SINGLES
DANCE
Friday, Nov. 15-8:30
American Legion

Health Association yesterday in
Goldberg to warn that such
"disregard" for the U.N. charter
could weaken the very struc-
ture of the United Nations.
A number of voting alterna-
tives have been suggested, but
most have built-in shortcom-
ings. One formula would base
voting on population. This would
give a handful of nations, in-
cluding India and the Soviet
Union, an automatic majority
if they held together. Should
Red China be seated with its
700 million people Asia could
hold full control.
If voting was based on who
foots the bill, the United States
would have almost one-third of'
the total vote and the Africans
would drop to the bottom of the
ladder. Needless to say, most
small nations will resist any
such suggestion.
One of the chief criticisms of
the ministates is that they par-
ticipate in a limited, way only.
The Maldive delegation, for in-
stance, showed up for only 30
of the 137 votes in the assembly
and its main committees/ in
1966. It also has been noted that
Iceland could hardly fulfill its
obligation to support U.N. petce
actions, since the Icelanders
have no army.
That has suggested that one
way to accommodate the niai-
states would be to set up asso-
ciate memberships. Such a
status might permit a small na-
tion to address the assembly,
but withhold voting rights.
Another suggestion has been
joint membership shared by sev-
eral small countries. They would
share the work of participating
in the committees and pze-
sumably share a single vote, al-
though this would require per-
petual harmony.
There is a growing move to
stem the minitide and action
may be taken before long to
k raise the barrier. But someuleele-
gates feel the influx should go
on unhindered on grounds :that
the General Assembly is only a
debating society, with the real
authority resting in the Secur-
ity Council which is dominated
by the Big Powers.

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
A LULL IN THE GROUND WAR in Vietnam ended
yesterday as fierce fighting broke out near the Cambo-
dian border.
In Paris, meanwhile, the peace talks remained suspended
amid reports that the South Vietnamese government is wor-
ried that President Johnson might yield to Hanoi on key
points in order to achieve peace.
Observers believe the United States has made little pro-
gress in attempts to convince Saigon to end its boycott of the
Paris talks.
CHAOS SPREAD ACROSS ITALY yesterday with a
24-hour strike marked by student demonstrations and
disorders.
Tens of thousands of high school and university students
staged street demonstrations and rallies in an attempt to
take over from the unions one of the biggest walkouts to hit
Italy since the end of World War II.
The success of the strike - only the first in a series of
walkouts scheduled for this month - was a strong'indication
that the minority government of Premier Giovanni Leone
would soon resign.
MEXICAN STUDENTS, after four months of strikes
and bloody riots, have received some governmental con-
cessions.
The government yesterday offered to give students a role
in restructuring police and limiting their authority - a re-
sponse to the two earlier demands of the students.
However, a series of student demands which evolved dur-
ing the demonstrations still await response from the govern-
nM ent.
THE UNITED STATES yesterday led the North Atlan-
tic Treaty Organization toward a power buildup in order
to counter strategic gains made when Russia advanced
into Czechoslovakia.
In the first three days of meetings of NATO's defense,
foreign, and finance ministers, all of the NATO allies except
France and Iceland promised increases in their contributions
to the common defense in response to a recommendation by
U.S. Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford. France has with-
drawn from NATO's military system, and Iceland has no
armed forces.
A NATO nuclear defense committee also accepted a U.S.
report proposing the use of "demonstrative" nuclear explos-
ions to warn aggressors. The report suggested that the allies
fire nuclear weapons in their own territory.
ALEXANDER DUBCEK told his Communist party's
Central Committee yesterday he would continue those re-
forms not ruled out by agreements with the Warsaw Pact
countries that invaded Cpechoslovakia last August.
Prague's new policy, Dubcek said, would include an open
and-sincere policy with respect to non-Communists, and ef-
forts to guarantee civil rights and freedoms for the Czechs.
PRESIDENT JOHNSON will consult w i t h Richard
Nixon on all major foreign policy decisions made before
Inauguration Day, the President-elect said yesterday.
While he acknowledged that he does not have any veto
power over a Johnson administration decision, Nixon said he
wants to demonstrate to the world that the United States
speaks with one voice, and that any decisions made now will
have a good chance of continuing in the new administration.
The statement was an apparent attempt to rebuff Saigon
leaders 'who are suspected of stalling the Paris peace talks
iii anticipation of a more friendly U.S. policy after Jan. 20.
U.S. CATHOLIC BISHOPS reached general agree-
ment yesterday to back Pope Paul VI's ban on all arti-
ficial means of birth control.
The National Conference of Catholic Bishops, meeting in
Washington, is expected to instruct the nation's 47 million
Roman Catholics to form their consciences on birth control
in solid accordance with the Vatican ban. A final vote will be
taken today.
The bishops are reportedly split'on a proposed statement
on the Vietnam War. They are expected to consider the prob-
lem of whether conscientious objection can be applied to a
specific war, without taking,a stand against all wars.

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SHORT MEN OF
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Sex, sin, and Surf. .. as men and women battle for the

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problems, as narrated by David Schoenbrun.

"THE PUMPKIN EATER"
By HAROLD PINTER
with ANN BANCROFT

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