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August 15, 1968 - Image 68

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-08-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, August 15, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, August 15, 1968

University
Players
Department
of
Speech
present

N. Vietnamese accused
of 'meddling' in politics
PARIS (MP) - The United States policy. No sign of progress was
accused North Vietnam yesterday detected by Harriman.
of meddling in American politics, Harriman, acting on instruc-
and demanded that it quit. Spurn- tions from Washington, called on
ing the demand, Hanoi's Ambas- Thuy to quit "trying to interfere
sador Xuan Thuy accused Presi- in internal American affairs"
dent Johnson's admiistration of with constant comments on the
forcibly suppressing opposition to presidential election contest

I

the Vietnam war.
Thuy's statement was made in
the 19th session of the Paris peace
talks. U.S. Ambassador W. Averell
Harriman called for a start in ser-
ious peacemaking with an end to
what he described as North Viet-
namese interference in American
internal affairs.
The three-hour session focused
on the issue of American bombing
Pueblo talks
WASHINGTON (P)- The State
Department indicated today that
a new secret meeting has been
arranged between U.S. and North
Korean representatives on the re-
lease of the captured intelligence
ship Pueblo and its 82 surviving
officers and crew.
The timing of the meeting was
not disclosed but press officer
Robert J. McCloskey told news-
men, "I anticipate there will be
a meeting." There have been 19,
earlier meetings at Panmunjom
in the demilitarized zone between
North .and South Korea.

Thuy displayed his disinterest
in the protest by sailing o n c e
more into a freewheeling assault
on the Johnson administration.
"Among the American people
the voice against the U.S. war of
aggression in Vietnam is every day
growing louder," Thuy told Harri-
man.
"This is why in t h e present
election campaign, in o r d e r to
cope with the indignation of the
people, the U.S. authorities have
had to use barbed wire and tens
of thousands of troops and police
agents."
Both in and outside the confer-
ence the men dwelt on North Viet-
nam's main demand - the ending
of all U.S. military action against
its territory. Both stood fast on
their old positions.
Before going into the meeting,
Harriman said he would call on
North Vietnam "to stop the car-
nage, stop the fighting, and get
on with the making, of peace."
"But if your choice is continued
fighting, and the continued use
of force and terror to achieve your
goals, you will find that the
people of South Vietnam will
continue to resist you with all
their strength-as they have over
the past decade."

THE THREE CANDIDATES for the Democratic presidential nomination met Tuesday before
the balloting for a bit of friendship. The familiar faces are Hubert Humphrey, left, Eugene
McCarthy, middle, and George McGovern, right.
Factionalismn at convention

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By CARL P. LEUBSDORF
Associated Press News Analyst
CHICAGO - The confronta-
tion of forces at this Democratic
National Convention is more basic
than traditional political faction-
alism, and thus more likely to
have a lasting impact on the par-
ty's course. J
This is not a situation in which
one group of party leaders, sup-
porting Hubert H. Humphrey,
fights to fend off other groups
backing Sens. Eugene J. McCar-
thy, George S. McGovern or Ed-
ward M. Kennedy.
Rather, it is a challenge of
groups with important generation-
al and ideological differences: the
political neophytes and the party
pros, the militant blacks and the
traditional white ethnic groups
and, in John F. Kennedy's phrase,
the New Frontier and the Old.
It is the type of conflict that
could not have erupted among
Republicans, who have managed
to maintain a basic homogeneity
despite the fact it has kept them
a minority for most of the past
three decades.
And it is the kind that will not
be halted among Democrats by a
successful drive by party regulars
to win the presidential nomination
for Humphrey.
Some party leaders have joined
with the insurgents in states such
as New York and California to

Harold Pinter's
THE HOMECOMING

HONDA HEADQUARTERS

protect their own positions.
But the driving force behind the
coalition that has challenged the
party establishment in one floor
fight after another has been the
young lawyers and housewives, the
civil right fighters and the. anti-
war activists-plus their, old line
liberal allies-who have entered
the main Democratic arena and
tried to capture it.I
Similar groups, though less mili-
tant ones, were led into party
ranks by Adlai E. Stevenson in
the 1950's and played ', key role
in John F. Kennedy's 1960 vic-
tory.
Whether it has been the Viet-
nam war, growing racial unrest or
the candidacy, of Sen. Eugene J.
McCarthy-and that of the late
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy-that
loosed this force, it is here and
stronger than many had imagined.j
The challenges to the regular
party organizations in Georgia
and Texas, beaten back by the
convention under prodding from
Humphrey leaders who feared a
disruption of their New Deal-type
coalition, have, won wider support
here than is held by the anti-
Humphrey presidential forces.
And the anti-establishment co-
alition victory in overriding the
Rules Committee to force Texas
and other-'states to drop the unit!
rule from the precinct level on up
starting in 1972.
The unit rule, as used through-
out the political structure, is the
way regulars have kept their op-
ponents on the outside in Texas,
for years. Presumably now, more
people with dissenting views will
be 'able to get in as they have in
other states.1
Besides the big delegations of
California and New York, which
have more than 10 per, cent of all
convention voting strength, sup-
port in these votes has come from
the McCarthyite visitors of New
Hampshire, Wisconsin and Oregon,'
from Gov. Harold E. Hu'ghes'
Iowans and McGovern's South
Dakotans, tand from, the newly
seated biracial loyalists of Georgia
and Mississippi.

This coalition, as the procedural
test votes clearly show, is not yet
a majority. And even on Vietnam,
as on the unit rule, it was depen-
dent on support from party reg-
ulars.
But those who have taken over
local and state Democratic parties
as part of the McCarthyite effort
are likely to persist past 1968.
And a defeat this year of the
party's national ticket, which so
many here freely predict, will only
spur increased efforts in 1972,
even though the spark of Vietnam
might be extinguished by then.
Chicago police
irk newsmen
CHICAGO WP)-Foreign .sews-
men from East and West have
heaped scorn and mockery on
police actioes and security meas-
ures at the 'Democratic National
Convention in Chicago. Dispatches
to their papers bristle with refer-
ences to "storm troopers" and
"concentration camps,."
Winston 'S. Churchill, who like
his famous grandfather, is start-
ing life as a correspondent, wrote
in the London Evening News:
"The Chicago police department
are primitive in their actions and
mulish in their, mentality.> Jour-
nalistic sorties in the past have
taken me to Aden, Yemen, Angola,,
the Congo, Borneo, Vietnam and
Israel. In none of these did I feel
the necessity of wearing a steel
helmet. I now rather regret not
having brought with me the one
I picked up in the Sinai Desert a
year ago."
John Pilger of the L o n d o n
Daily Mirror wrote, "We are con-
vened in a building called the In-
ternational Amphitheater which.
stands beside the Chicago stock-
yards where the cattle and the
pigs are surrounded by an ordin-
ary fence and we, the people are
surrounded by barbed wire and by
soldiers and police and deputy
sheriffs and Secret Service men
with guns and tanks and planes
at the ready and little canisters of
spray which, when squirted, dis-
able the body and the mind."

*i

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'F'
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