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November 13, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-13

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Wednesday, November 13, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, November 13, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

PROGRAMS AND PROMISES
How Nixon will handle America's problems

By WALTER R. MEARS
Associated Press Staff Writer
When Republican Richard
M. Nixon goes before a Demo-
cratic Congress late in January
to outline the aspirations of his
presidency, he will urge that
government strive to put "the
great engine of private enter-
prise" to work on the nation's
social problems.
He will, it seems certain,
urge dispersal of government
power from Washington to other
echelons of authority, "to begin
breaking up massive problems
into manageable pieces."
Abroad, he will likely talk of
a new era of negotiation with
the Communist world. But he
* will at the same time pledge
firmness and advocate steps
to enhance U.S. military might,
U.S. military might, "so that we
would not be afraid to negoti-
ate."

His keynote probably will be
an appeal for unity and under-
standing at home. And he un-
doubtedly will pledge an effort
to establish communication
with every one of the dissident
groups," with Negroes, with the
poor, with disenchanted young
Americans.
Those are among the major
themes Nixon has sounded
throughout nine months of
campaigning. Translated into
specific proposals, and in some
instances into legislation, these
policy pronouncements and oth-
ers can be expected to form the
framework for the State of the
Union address and many of the
other messages Nixon will be
sending to Congress.
Vietnam
This is the great question
mark in the Nixon program, for
the president-elect maintained
throughout his campaign an em-

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bargo on any discussion of what
he would do as President to deal
with the war.
His position as President on
the current bombing halt re-
mains an enigma, too. He has
supported President Johnson's
current halt, but he has also
said that to be acceptable, this
posture must enhance peace
prospects. Events between now
and Jan. 20 may well determine
his attitude as President.
He has said:
"The war must be ended. It
must be ended honorably . . .
We must seek a negotiated set-
tlement." -
Nixon has pronounced it dis-
honorable for the United States
"under any kind of a subter-
fuge simply to pull out."
"The South Vietnamese people
must. have a right to self-de-
termination," campaigner Nixon
said. "That is a minimum we
must insist on."
Nixon also said he would em-
phasize "de-Americanization" of
the war. He said there must be
a greater stress "on the train-
ing of the South Vietnamese to
fight their own battles and on
giving the South Vietnamese
people other than the military
something to fight for rather
than something simply to be
against."
He advocated a broadening of
the peace talks, to include the
Soviet Union and other powers
with an interest in the South-
east Asian situation.
Foreign Policy
Nixon promises a foreign pol-
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icy of firmness, and also of
negotiation. "To the leaders of
the Communist world we say:
'After an era of confrontation,
the time has come for an era
of negotiation'," Nixon said.
"Because this will be a period
of negotiatioin, we shall restore
the strength of America'so that
we shall always negotiate from
strength and never from weak-
ness."
Nixon advocates constant and
continuing negotiation with the
Soviet Union, including a series
of summit meetings.
"It is time to develop a new
diplomacy for the United States,
a diplomacy to deal with future
aggression-so that when, the
freedom of friendly nations is
threatened by aggression, we
help them with our arms; but
we let them fight the war and
don't fight the war for them,"
Nixon said.
Defense
Nixon placed great emphasis
on a drive to enlarge American
military might. He put it this
way: "I intend to restore our
objective of clear-out military
superiority -meaning by this
the aggregate that constitutes
real superiority rather than
competition weapon by . wea-
pon."
Obviously, this is going to
mean more military spending.
His estimates now indicate mili-
tary spending $10 billion above
current, Vietnam-inflated levels
by the end of a four-year Nixon
term.
Nixon promised reorganiza-
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The President-elect campaigns

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tion of the Pentagon to elimi-
nate what he called over-cen-
tralization, and restore ready
access to the President by top
military professionals.
Nixon also advocates an end
to the draft after the Vietnam
war is over, with an all-volun-
teer armed force to replace it.
The pay and other incentives
necessary to attract an all-
volunteer force would cost some
$5 billion a year, he has esti-
mated.
Education
Nixon supported federal aid
to education, but says the Pre-
sident must -make sure "that
federal control does not fol-
low."
"Let us have a federal gov-
ernient program for education
that will turn back to the states,
withoutanyastrings, the money
that the states can use to up=
grade their educational stand-
ards at the local level."
He advocates income tax cre-
dits to offset the expenses of a
parent or anyone else who helps
pay for a student to attend' col-
lege.
Taxes
Nixon advocated elimination
of the 10 per cent income sur-,
tax. He at first said it should
lapse when the Vietnam war
is ended, later that he would
drop it on schedule - which
would indicate no request for
its renewal after next June 30
He recommended federal tax
sharing, which would return un-
restricted grants to the states
and local governments to en-
hance their ability to deal with
public problems. " . ..Let's have
the federal government get out
of these areas wherever we pos-
sibly can," he said.
Poverty
The thrust of Nixon's approach
to the problem of poverty is to
enlist private enterprise,
through tax credits and incen-
tives, in the effort to help the
poor, with jobs, training and
improved neighborhoods.
Nixon said that he would as
swiftly as possible eliminate the
Job Corps program. "As an al-
ternative, I believe we should
give a tax credit to private en-
terprise to train the unemployed
for jobs that really exist," he
said.
Nixon said the Headstart pro-
gram of pre-school education is
one he would continue.
The Cities
Nixon maintains that a cycle

of welfare and public housing
has actually "perpetuated pov-
erty" in the cities.
His chief programs in this'
field:
- Tax incentives for busi-
nesses which locate branch of-
fices or new plants in poverty
areas, rural as well as urban.
- An effort to promote "black
capitalism," Negro ownership
and operation . of businesses in
the cities. Noting that risk capi-
tal now is often unavailable for
ghetto enterprises, Nixon said
there should be new loan guar-
antee programs, reinsurance and
an expansion of Small Business
Administration loan offerings.
He envisioned a Domestic De-
velopment Bank to provide loans
and mortgage guarantees f o r
businesses in poverty areas.
- A New Enterprise program
in which businessmen and
teachers would Help train Neg-
roes in the cities to own or
manage businesses. Nixon pro-
posed tax deductions be offered
to attract instructors.
Civil Rights
- "I do not see any significant
area where additional legisla-
tion could be passed that would
be helpful in opening doors that
are legally closed," Nixon said.
We must now concentrate on
such areas as economic develop-
ment, education, building and
strengthening the black com-
munity from within and fash-
ioning a new understanding be-
tween the races."
Nixon declared himself op-
posed to the busing of students
to achieve racial balance in the
schools, insisting that this could
actually prove detrimental to
the education of the children
involved.
Law and Order
Nixon promised a war on crime
to include the creation of a
Cabinet-level National Law En-
forcement Council which, he
said, would coordinate federal
policy on crime prevention and
control. *,
Nixon repeatedly criticized
Supreme Court decisions on the
rights of criminal suspects, say-
ing that some of them have
created an imbalance between
what he calls "the peace forces
and the criminal forces."
Nixon advocates' new laws
and more manpower to fight or-
ganized crime. He favors the
use, under court order, of wire-
tapping and electronic surveil-
lance against organized crime.

the
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
PRESIDENT-ELECT RICHARD NIXON announced
yesterday he will appoint Bryce N. Harlow, former White
House aide, as a special assistant to the president.
Nixon's first major appointee will handle "management
of legislation and Congressional affairs," according to Nixon
aide Ron Zeigler.
Harlow, most recently a governmental relations expert
with Proctor and Gamble, was deputy assistant to former
President Eisenhower.
THE SUPREME. COURT yesterday declared unconsti-
tutional the infamous Arkansas "monkey law" which pro-
hibited John Scopes from teaching the theory of evolu-
tion in 1925.
Although Scopes' conviction for not teaching "the divine
creation" was reversed on a technicality, the state retained
the law in 1927 and did not repeal it until last year. Yester-
day's court decision by Justice Abe Fortas declared the First
Amendment prohibits states from tailoring teaching to "any
religious sect or dogma."
In other action, the Court:
! upheld a New York federal court ruling permtting
peaceful distribution of anti- Vietnam war literature inside
the Port Authority bus terminal; .
" granted Edgar H. Smith Jr., cell block author on New
Jersey's death row for 11 years, a chance to upset his convic-
tion in the murder of a 15-year-old girl;
" denied an appeal by convicted atom bomb spy Morton
Sobell to leave prison before his term expires next August.
JAMES EARL RAY, accused assassin of the Rev. Mar-
tin Luther King, won yesterday a'postponement of his
trial until March.
The trial, which was slated to begin yesterday, was de-
layed on the grounds that Ray needs more time to plan strat-
egy with his new lawyer.
Ray's first lawyer, former Birmingham mayor Arthur
Hanes, was fired Sunday because of major disagreement over
defense tactics.
The defendant reportedly is hopeful of faring better when
the Republican administration takes over in January.
CZECHOSLOVAKIA announced yesterday it will curb
the rights of its citizens to travel abroad.
In one of the most serious blows since the Soviet invas-
ion, the government said new procedures will virtually pro-
hibit all private and business trips which "cannot be con-
trolled."
Diplomatic sources said the new system means a return
to close police scrutiny of each departure from the country.
Hard-line Communists have reportedly b e e n worried
since the invasion about the "brain drain" and general em-
migration.
AMERICA'S FIRST MANNED FLIGHT around the
moon was slated yesterday for December 21.
The National Aeronautic and Space Administration an-
nounced it plans to send three astronauts - Air Force Col.
Frank Berman, Navy Capt. James Lovell Jr. and Air Force
Major William Anders - into 10 orbits some 70 miles above..
the moon on Christmas eve.
If the flight goes as planned, the Apollo 8 crew will re-
turn television pictures of the flight and the lunar surface, on
the order of the Apollo 7 shows. NASA is particularly inter-
ested in studying the lunar equatorial area where another
team may attempt to land late next year.
* " "
MOVES TO SEAT RED CHINA in the United Nations
were opposed again by the United States yesterday.
U.S. Ambassador J. R. Wiggens urged the General Assem-
bly to reject , motion by Albania and 14 other nations to give
Mainland China the seat now held by the Nationalist Chinese
on Taiwan.I
However, Wiggens said the U.S. will vote to set up a com-
mittee to study the possibilities of seating both nations in the
General Assembly, but maintaining only the Nationalist seat
on the Security Council.
A vote on the issue is expected Friday.
T H E CATHOLIC BISHOPS CONFERENCE refused
yesterday to mediate a dispute concerning 40 Washington,
D.C. priests punished by their cardinal for supporting

birth control.
Patrick Cardinal O'Boyle stripped the priests of church
duties and cast leaders from their rectories after they said
contraception should be a matter of individual conscience.
0 * *
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE CLARK CLIFFORD ruled
out yesterday the possibility he will continue serving un-
der President-elect Richard Nixon.
Clifford told a Pentagon news conference he has recom-
mended to Nixon that a new secretary of defense be appoint-
ed by mid-December "so we can start him on a period of or-
ientation as quickly as possible."
The defense chief, appointed by President Johnson to
succeed Robert MacNamara, said that after 62 years of being
a Democrat the likelihood of serving a Republican president
"is so remote as not to warrant comment."

Lus Sunues
the exterminati"
STARTS THURSDAY

Fl1 7A

I

FOCUS ON LATIN AMERICA

IVAN ILLICH, Centro Intercultural de Documentacion
Ivan Illich is founder of the Centro Intercultural de Documentacion (CIDOC), Cuernavaca, Mexico, an organiza-
tion of scholars engaged in the study, analysis and publication of sociocultural information about Latin America.
He was formerlyVice President of the Catholic University of Puerto Rico.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13
noon-Canterbury House, 330 Maynard St. "Peasants in Latin American Church and So-
ciety." A discussion with Prof. Eric Wolf, Anthropology.
8:00 p.m-St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, 306 N. Division. "Christianity and Communism:
Coexistence or Conflict." A discussion with Prof. Alfred Meyer, Political Science.

U

OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS,
CAMPUS CENTER, INTERFAITH+
OF EDUCATION.

CANTERBURY HOUSE, NEWMAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION, ECUMENICAL
COUNCIL FOR PEACE,COMPARATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM OF SCHOOL

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AAHS THEATRE GUILD
presents
WAIT UNTIL DARK
Wed., Fri., Sat., Nov. 13, 14, 15
AAHS LITTLE THEATRE
8:00
Tickets $1.00

sday-Saturday
i Mendelssohn
Theatre

MY HUSTLER
by
ANDY WARHOL
Sex, sin, and Surf . . . as men and women battle for the
same lover from 42nd Street to Fire Island. A study of
deviant subculture. Next week: An Eros Festival.
1.._1,1^A DT A EIM A DI/CI '

I

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Ann Arbor Art Association
Annual 1-day Craft Sale

The Gilbert

7

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