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November 13, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesdav, November 13, 1968

theatre DEFICIT MOUNTS, COSTS RISE
Music Society turns to private sa

pport

By MARCIA ABRAMSON
For the first time in 90 years,
University Musical Society is
turning to public support lin or-
der to protect its programs.
Faced with increasing costs
and running deficits, the Society
is about to begin soliciting. con-
tributions to the concert endow-
ment fund.
Four categories of contribu-
tors have been established, and
donors will receive. commensur-
ate privileges, explains UMS
Director Gail W. Rector.
' These privileges will include
ticket and location priorities,
advance program notes, resumes,
and parking privileges.
The four categories have been
established as sustaining mem-
ber, patron, sponsor, and guar-
antor. Exact amounts for con-.
tributions have not been deter-
mined yet...
However, Rector emphasizes
that the guarantor category will
be based on a $25 annual dona-
tion so that students will not
be excluded from participating
as contributors.
UMS will also increase ticket
prices for this year's May Festi-
val and all of next year's con-
cert series. However, Rector
says prices will still be com-
paratively lower than for sim-
ilar series.
The increase will range from
three to five dollars over five
different price ranges. Rector
says the increase will amount to
between 50 cents and one dol-
lar per concert.
"We're first of all seeking in-,
creased student attendance,"
Rector says. "That's why we try
to keep ticket prices down."
Exidently UMS has been suc-
cessful. About 25 per cent of all
regular series ticket subscrib-
ers are students, and other stu-
dents purchase single tickets.
Rector hopes to interest even
more students.
The decision to seek contribu-
tions and raise ticket prices
came at the UMS Board of Dir-
ectors meeting last week. Ear-
lier this year, a financial re-
port on the Society was pre-
sented to the Regents which re-
vealed a $115,000 lost last year
and $50,000 deficit predicted for
next year.
At that time, the Society's
Board of Directors set up a
special committee to determine

how to handle the financial
crisis.
"This is the first time UMS
has ever sought private gifts in
this way, and / e believe it
should be successful. We hope
we won't have to raise ticket
prices again," Rector says.
Rector believes about $50,000
can be raised each year through
contributions. This would bal-
ance entirely the projected loss
for next year.
In the absence of a major
campaign for gifts, UMS has re-
ceived only $5000 in endowments
over the last 20 years.
UMS also hopes to cut debts
by consolidating some of its
concert series. The less-diluted
schedule has increased ticket
sales by 20 per cent, Rector ex-
plains, while consolidation has
helped to reduce operating costs
by 43 per cent.
However, he adds that the
major cause of the $115,000
1967-68 deficit was the costly
Fair Lane Festival, which was
not a usual UMS program.
UMS spent more than $50,-
000 on Fair Lane and received
only $4000 from the Sesquicen-
tennial Committee to offset
costs, Rector says.
. Fair Lane consisted of eleven
major concerts held on Dear-
born Campus as part of the

University's
Celebration.

Sesquicentennial

Most musical societies, dance
groups, orchestras - all musi-
cal performers - depend to
some extent on private dona-
tions to meet rising costs of op-
eration.
The 1968 Choral Union Series
is costing UMS about $1000
more per artist and about $500
more for maintenance and ad-
vertising for ten concerts, Rec-
tor explains.
Musicians demand and re-
Fri. and Sat
STEVE
MILLER
BAND
Sunday
MOODY
Grande Ballroom
Detroit

ceive consistently higher wages.
For example, the Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra raised music-
ian's salaries by $3500 or more
this year. UMS must pay twice
as much for major symphony
orchestras as it did ten years
ago.
At their meeting, the UMS
directors also announced that
the 1969 May Festival will be

April 24-27 and will feature the
Philadelphia orchestra.
Rector was chosen UMS
president, succeeding Dr. Char-
les Sink who retired after 64
years with the Society.
Four new directors were cho-
sen for 1969. They are Daniel
H. Schurz. graduate school dean
Stephen Spurr, and Profs.
Douglas Crary and Paul Kauper.

i____

*

a film made by Frederic Rossif from documents of the Spanish
Civil War-"Beautiful, unforgettable." Judith Crist, N.Y.H.T.
Shown Sun., Mon. Nov, 17-18
7 and 9, ASo. A Adm. $1-SDS
- - --

Don Quixote y Sancho Panza

rM

LITTLE CLUB
with

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BARBARELLA

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PTP

goes. Broadway

The John Higgins Quintet
an outstanding jazz band
9-12 R.M.
October 15, 1968

Three Broadway musicals and
two comedies will be the fare of
this year's Professional Theatre.
Program Play of the Month Ser-
les. Highlighted by productions
of Man of La Mancha and Fid-
dier on the Roof, the five pro-
ductions constitute "unquestion-
ably the strongest roster of at-
tractions in its annual series of
Broadway successes the Profes-
sional-Theatre Program has ever
offered," according to Robert-
C. Schnitzer, PTP executive di-
rector.
Robert Anderson's You Know
I Can't Hear You When the
Water's Running, will launch
the new series at Hill Aud. Jan.
13 and 14. The comedy, which is
playing a second season in New
York, received warm critical re-
views when it opened last year.'
The road company will star
Imogene Coca and her husband,
King Donovan.
The brutal effects of anti-,
Semitism clash with the tradi-
tional pattern of Jewish com-
munity life in Fiddler on the
Roof, which will play Jan. '27
and 28. Critically acclaimed as
"an enduring theatre milestone,"
Fiddler on the Roof is derived
from the short stories of Sho-
lom Aleichim and coincerns the
fate of a Jewish milkman and
TONIGHT
FREE SHOWING
SONG OF ,,
'CEYLON
Dir. John Grierson
NANOOK
OF THE
NORTH
Dir. Robert Flaherty
7:00 and 9:05
Architecture Auditorium
Dial 8-6416
Ends
Wednesday,

his family who are finally ex-,
pelled from tsarist Russia.
The musical comedy is better
called a nelodrama with music,
which originally starred Zero
Mostel and was directed and
choreographed by Jrome Rob-
bins, of West Side Story fame.
The third offering, Black
Comedy, by British playwright
Peter Shaffer, will play in Hill
on Feb. 19 "and 20. Revealing
what happens when the lights
go out at a posh party, the
play benefited from the comic
talents of Lynn Redgrave last
season ;in New York. The road
company stars, theatre-televis-
ion-film actress Jan Sterling.
Shaffer's previous work, in-
cluding the Royal Runt of the
Sun, Private Ear and Public
Eye and Five Finger Exercise
have all been presented in Ann
Arbor.
The Apple Tree, a comic mu-
sical trilogy, will be presented
here March 14 and 15. The
Broadway production rode on
the merits of Mike Nichol's well-
passed direction and earned at-
tention as "an innovation in the
theatre." Tom Ewell, in Ann
Arbor last year in The Impos-
sible Years, and TV actress
Rosemary Prinz will star.
The final, and perhaps most
notable production in the series,
Man of La Mancha will appear
March 24 and 25. The musical

adaption of Don Quixote, blend-
ed with elements of the life of
Cervantes, is playing its third
year on Broadway. Originally
given grudging critical approv-
al, the play gained repute as it
endured and Man of La Mancha
finally won five Tony Awards,
plus the New York D r am a'
Citics' Circle Prize of best mu-
sical of 1965.
Subscriptions for all five plays'
go on sale by mail and at the
PTP ticket ,office at L y d i a
Menoelssohn at major discounts
beginning Thursday. Individual
ticket sales begin Jan. 8.

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Another evening for you to come and sing,
sing-along, listen and feel- together
THURSDAY and FRIDAY

1421 Hill St,
8:30 P.M.

BOB FRANKE-
singer, songwriter with Gene Barkin-electric guitar, Alan Ness
--cello and harmonica, and Jeremy-bass and sax.
SATURDAY
JOHN SUNDELL-
singing blues, contemporary and original folk music-accompan-
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A&T GULFSTR~AMPARK

Ameousand Wonders and a Three LDav Collage

SATURDAY, DEC. 281 pm -10 pm
Jose Feliciano * Country Joe and the Fish "
Buffy Sainte Marie * Chuck Berry * The Infinite
McCoys * John Mayall's Bluesbreakers "
Booker T. and The M.G.'S. * Dino Valente*
Fleetwood Mac

MONDAY, DEC. 30 1 pm ;10 pm
Jose Feliciano Canned Heat * The
Turtles . Iron Butterfly " The Joe Tex Revue "
Ian and Sylvia e"The Grassroots e"Charles
Lloyd Quartet " Sweet Inspirations * The
Grateful Dead

I f 1eautif ul Musikj
15%/DISCOUNT COUPON UMI
MIAMI POP FESTIVAL
P.O. BOX 3900 MIAMI, FLORIDA 33101
NO.TICKETS SAT., DEC. 28 @ $6.00 Ea.
' NO. TICKETS SUN., DEC. 29 @ $6.00 Ea. ,
NO. TICKETS MON., DEC. 30 @ $6.00 Ea.
$6I00 Includes all-day admission (tickets at the door,
i available: $7.00)
I have enclosed $ in check or money
order payable to "Miami Pop Festival. I
I understand that the management does not
guarantee delivery on orders postmarked
later than Dec. 9, 1968.'j
Name
Address
City
StateZip

2 EXCITINGNEW. PLAYS!
2'
A powerful and prophetic An imaginative and
play by the daring young provocative new play by
Czech liberal leader.the author of
(196 Prague success *Blackboard Jungle.
now banned.
THE, WORLD PREMIERE OF
byy
IVAN KuMA
Adapted by RUTH WILLARDEVAN HUNTER
TUES., DEC. 3 UN., DEC. 8 MON., FEB. 3-SAT., FEB. 8

SUNDAY, DEC. 29.1 pm -10 pm
Steppenwolf " Jr. Walker and the All Stars
Butterfield Blues Band " Flatt and Scruggs
Marvin Gaye " Joni Mitchell " The Boxtops
Richie Havens + James Cotton Blues Band
H. P. Lovecraft

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PLUS EVERY DAY:
The 1968 Invitational Walking Catfish Derby; The Giant
Ti-Leaf Slide; Hundreds of Arts and Crafts Displays; The
Warm Tropical Sun and aFull Miami Moon; Meditation
Grove; Wandering Musicians; Blue Meanies on Parade;
Things to Buy and Eat; 20 Acres of Hidden Surprises in
Beautiful Gardens; World's First Electronic Skydivers;
Stratospheric Balloons; Kaleidoscopic Elephants ,

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