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November 12, 1968 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-12

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Tuesday, November 12, 1,968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, November 12, 1 96S THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

-Associated Press
A bit of ' in Rome
Michael Radock, vice president for University Ireiations, and his wife are leading an alumni
group on a nine-day visit to Rome. They met with Gardner Ackley, a former University professor,
who is now ambassador to Italy.

I

__

WON'T' SIT BACK':

Will Russian
tanks invade
Kentucky?
Accuse 5 in plot
to overthrow gov't
of Pike County
PIKEVILLE, Ky. (CPS) - Bib
overalls, out-of-state license
plates, and singing of "We Shall
Overcome" were introduced as
evidence of un-American activities
during an investigation of Appal-
achian Volunteers here last week.
The Kentucky Un-American Ac-'
tivities Committee (KUAC) held
hearings on alleged seditious ac-
tivities in Eastern Kentucky, a
culmination of a conflict that
erupted last year when five anti-
poverty workers were indicted oXi
charges of plotting to overthrow
the county government,
The state law on which t h e
charges were based was later ruled
unconstitutional by a federal
court.
The dispute includes P i k e-
ville College, a small liberal
arts school headed by Dr. Thomas
Johns. He incensed local residents
by hiring professors opposed to the
Vietnam war and by holding open
forums on strip mining.
Dr. Johns' critics protest that
the college is becoming too liberal,
but the president has continued
his new policies. "What I'm go-
ing to do is run the best educa-
tional institution I can, which
means I'm going to demand that
the issues facing our society be
discussed, investigated and analy-
zed. I'm not going to sell my soul
for prejudice, hate or bigotry," he
said.
One of the anti-poverty workers
indicted for sedition, Alan Mc-
Surely (he wore bib overalls),
charged recently in a radio broad-
cast that Pike County was run by
a "courthouse gang" working for
a few coal-inine operators.
That statement prompted t h e
local prosecutor to say, with all
seriousness, "I want to warn Mc-
Surely that if he calls on Russian
tanks to help him conquer Pike
County, I intend to appeal to
Mayor (Richard) Daley of Chi-
cago and (former Ala.) G o v.
George Wallace for help in de-
fending Pike County."
The KUAC committee packed
up and left without naming any
Communists or taking any action
other than recommending less po-
litical involvement by AV's. And
latest reports indicate that no
tanks have been spotted yet in
Eastern Kentucky.

Think selfishly about your Many have found career
own career before you decide enrichment at Du Pont. This comes
on one with Du Pont. from being handed a ball and
being expected to run with it. From
working with top people, from
growing in a company where the
opportunities are always wide open
and the projects are often way out.
Many have found professional
fulfillment and have built a very full,
varied and happy life as "Du Ponters."
Others have found, after working
at Du Pont, that their professional
Be selfish. But be honest. interest lay in teaching, in further
You've put in a lot of tough years study or in an industry that
to get your degree. Your allegiance offered even wider scope in their
lies with a professional discipline. particular discipline. All of these
Why, then, must you decide now men left Du Pont far better qualified
to plight your trust to a company professionally than when they came.
for life? Don't. Join a company
first. If it doesn't
advance you within that
professional discipline,
well, you're not
married to it.

So talk to the Du Pont recruiter.
If he offers you something, think
of it as a professional challenge, not
a proposal of marriage.
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Wilmington, DE 19898
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College Relations

House Democrats plan fight
to retain Great Society'

WASHINGTON (A) - House
Democrats are coupling public
pledges of cooperation on vital
issues with thinly veiled warnings
they'll oppose the Nixon admin-
istration if it tries to scuttle some
Great Society programs. I
House Speaker John W. Mc-
Cormack of Massachusetts said
Friday Democrats "will not be a
negative party, but an affirma-
tive party."
He added that during the Eisen-
hower. years "major Eisenhower
programs were put through Con-
gress largely by the votes of
Democrats."
But, McCormick said "the elec-
tion was a mandate from the
American people to support con-
tinuance of programs" enacted
under Presidents Kennedy and
Johnson by Democratic con-
gresses.
Democrats suffered a net loss of
four seats, giving them a 243-192
A ┬▒najority in the coming 91st Con-
gress.
Although ;the Democrats don't
know just what changes, if any;
President-elect Richard M. Nixon
may propose, they are girding for
attacks on the antipoverty pro
gram, aid to eduication and legis-
p~ lation dealing with urban affairs.
Rep. Carl D. Perkins, D-Ky., of
the Education and Labor Com-
mittee, which is likely to be a
major battleground in such a
fight, sounded the keynote Friday.
"We'll cooperate with Mr. Nixon
in any constructive proposals, but
I don't intend to sit back and see
the things we fought so long and
hard for go down the drain' he
said in an interview.
Perkins plans to get committee
Democrats together before the
MATHEMATICIANS
PHYSICISTS
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ENGINEERS
LINCOLN LABORATORY
has openings for a
limited number of en-
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mathematicians.
LINCOLN LABORATORY,
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applications to national
defense and space
exploration.
A LABORATORY REPRESENTATIVE
WILL INTERVIEW APPLICANTS
NOV. 15

new Congress opens Jan. 3 and
try to get some agreement on the
programs they will fight to con-
tinue over any GOP opposition.
The same approach on a broad-
er scale is being worked out by the
Democratic Study Group, a loose-
ly-knit organization of liberal
and moderate Democrats that
functions independently of the
regular House leadership.
Rep. James G. O'Hara, D-Mich.,
DSG president, said he will meet
with other leaders of the group
next week for a preliminary dis-
cussion of the situation.
"We'll have to figure out where
our strength is and where we
should make our stand," said
O'Hara in -contemplating a Nixon
blow at Johnson administration
programs.
Perkins and O'Hara both expect
the Job Corps program for train-
ing high school dropouts to be a
prime target of the new admin-
istration. Nixon was critical of
the. Job Corps in his campaign
speeches.

House Republicans have fought
the Job Corps for years, calling it
a wasteful program whose aims
could be reached better through
existing vocational education
training centers. The 90th Con-
gress ordered a study made of the
feasibility of such a switch.
Another area of attack expect-
ed by the Democrats is in the pro-
gram of direct federal grants to
school districts. The Republicans
favor funneling the money to the
states instead of the local districts
and Nixon has endorsed such an
approach.
O'Hara said he also looks for
Repblican attempts to eliminate
the National Labor Relations
Board and to add new restrictions
on union activities to the Taft-
Hartley Act.
The possibility of a running
battle between Congress and the
White House is not dismaying to
the Democrats at this stage.
"It looks like an interesting
session," said O'Hara. "I'm look-
ing forward to it."

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