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November 12, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-12

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN

GAILY

Tuesday, November 12, k968

p

2

EARN YOUR MASTER'S DEGREE
OR PhD WHILE YOU WORK

High Court reviews
free speech' cases

AT
MOTOROLA
IN PHOENIX
Motorola offers the student at the BS or MS level an op-
portunity to advance his career and education concurrently.
Work and achieve a Master's or PhD Degree in an environ-
ment of constant challenge and tremendous growth.
THE ENGINEERING TRAINING PROGRAM
Open to BS or MS graduates in Electrical Engineering,
Chemical Engineering or Physics with a B average or better.
While pursuing ar. MS or PhD degree at Arizona State Uni-
versity each trainee is placed in a rotational program cov-
ering four engineering activities at Motorola.
THE MARKETING TRAINING PROGRAM
Open to BS graduates in Electrical-Engineering or Physics
with a B-average or better. Marketing trainees may work
toward an MBA or an MS or PhD degree. Rotational assign-
mernts are in the marketing area.
JERRY FULTON and RAY HUBBELL
will be recruiting on
NOVEMBER 19, 1968

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- Two appeals
testing the limits of free speech
will confront the Supreme Court
when it returns today from a two-
week recess.
One concerns two New Yorki
groups protesting the war in Viet-
nam and the other is based on
the right to diskribute religious
literature.
Together, the cases question
whether rights granted the Con-
stitution should be interpreted
by local authorities to spare cit-
izens from so-called nuisances.
Except for this comnon theme,
however, their appeals are diverse.
BUS TERMINAL
The Vietnam protestk groups,
Veterans and Reservists to End
the War in Vietnam and the Fifth
Avenue Vietnam Peace Parade
Commitee, decided in the fall of
1966 to take their arguments into
the Port Authority bus terminal'
on Manhattan's West Side.
They handed out literature to
businessmen and many service-
men and then attempted to set up
tables to hand out anti-war leaf-
lets. The terminal police threat-
ened arrest if they did not leave.
A ruling last March by the U.S.
Circuit Court in New York City
said the terminal building is an
appropriate place to express views
on provocative and controversial
subjects precisely because it is
heavily used by the public. TheI
appeal was asked by the Port
Authority.
The appeal of the Rev. Vernon
C. Lyons, a Baptist minister in
Chicago, was ruled the opposite
way in lower courts.
PARKING LOT
Rev. Lyons decided totake his ;
wife and four, of his chilren' to a
large parking lot to place under
the windshield of parked cars
small paper pamphlets containing
the biblical book "the Acts of the
. ~ Apostles."
Aftera while they were stopped
and told there would be no ob-
PARAGON
RAPID COPY CENTER'
311 E. L BE RTY
COPIES WHILE YOU WAIT
OFFSET COPIES'
AS LOW AS 6/1Oc Per Copy
DROP IN OR CALL
662-3748,

jection if they stood at the lot's
entrance and exit to distribute the
tracts to motorists-but that they
could not remain on the lot iself.
The minister refused to obey,
was arrested, convicted of vio-
lating a littering regulation and
fined $25.
Mr. Lyons asserted the First
Amcndment's guarantees of free-
doin of, speech and freedom of t
religion but lost in Illinois state
courts.
LITTER
Justice Robert C. Underwood,
speaking for the State Supreme
Court last March, said the min-
ister had to give way in the in-
terest of keeping the parking lot
clean and not bothring the mo-
torists.
Not only were pamphlets swept
up by the wind and left all over
the, lot, Underwood said, but they
were "a source of annoyance to
numerous car owners."
Reinstate
'Purdue
editor.
Special To The Daily
LAFAYETTE, Ind. - William
Smoot II was reinstated yesterday
as editor of the Purdue Univer-
sity student newspaper - the Ex-
ponent - pending a two-week re-
view of the newspaper's operations
by a student-faculty committee.
The action was taken at a meet-
ing between the senior editors of
the paper and Purdue President
Frederick Hovde and Executive
Vice 'President Edward Mallett.
Smoot was fired Friday by
Mallett because of the Exponent's
publication of elleged obscenities.
The staff of the Exponent rejected
the firing, claining that they were
the legal publishers of the paper.
Hovde and Mallett originally
proposed that Smoot be suspended
from his post during the commit-
tee review. The editor was reirn-
stated after the senior editors
unanimously rejected the propos-
al.
A number of student groups had
threatened a boycott of classes
for today if Smoot were not rein-
stated.

Direct Placement at all Degree Levels for...
a Electrical Engineers a Organic & Physical Chemists
a Physicists a Chemical Engineers a Metallurgists
in Research and Development, Quality Control,
Marketing, andProduction.
f you are unavailable for an interview at this
- time write directly to:,Director of College Relations,
Motorola Inc., Semiconductor Products Division,
5005 East Mcpowell, Phoenix, Arizona 85008.;
MOT'OROLA INo.
MSemlconductor Proeducts Oivisirn

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LAST SCHOOL YEAR

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Spent $533.15 for Exec. Board, ieals and for coffee & doughnuts

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Spent $1186 for salaries including $250 to Mike Koeneke and $350 to Bob Neff for summer
room and board

Spent $1729.94 to attend various political conferences
Lost $1119 on its imaginative Vist Program
SO FAR THIS YEAR
Appropriated $100 to Columbia "U" strike committee
Toyedwith $1500 for bail fund money
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Allocated funds for Sharon Lowen to attend the Conference on Revolutionary Politics in New
York City
Allocated funds in support of the SDS-inspired student strike
Gave SGC, Inc., a separate private corporation, $100

get into the bra slip and down to a bare minimum
I o'underdressing. . . a once-over-lightly combination
of bra and slip in one smooth, sleek nylon tricot garment.
A. Hotlywood Vassarette lace-iced chemise length, elastic
back. Lemon white or blue. Sizes 32 to 36, B and C. 8.00
B. Vanity Fair white bra slip with fiberfill underwire
cup. Sizes 32 to 34, A; 32 to 36, B cup.,11.00
C. Tru Balance beige crepeset longline with spandex

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