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November 10, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-10

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Page Two

1IHt Mi(-HIUAN L)AIL0

....,:.,
__

3unday, iNovember 10, '1968$

cinema=

A

deadly dull August

Off the gridiron, onto to the stage
The University's Men's Glee Club joined its Illinois counterpart in song before a large audience
at Hill Auditorium last night. After their team suffered a humiliating defeat at the hands of the
Rose Bowl bound Wolverines, the Illini singers were all choked up. But the show must go on.
* music

By HENRY GRIX
Don't let anybody kid you,
Paris in the month of August
is deadly dull. The Parisians
close their stores, and head for
the country, abandoning the
oppressively hot city to the
tourists.
The tourists make bad mo-
vies. Like Paris in the Month
of August now showing at the
Campus.
Even though the film con-
cerns the super-, pseudo-ro-
mantic affair between a fish-
ing rod salesman and an tour-
ing English model, the blame
can't be placed on the visitor.
The girl (Susan Hampshire)
acts pretty well and looks even
better. The Parisian stay-at-
home (Charles Aznacour) is
pretty ugly, but he sure can
act.
In fact, it is hard to place
the blame anywhere, since the
credits list no director, only
Claude Renoir, director of
photography. And you can't
blame someone for not wanting
his name up as director. Maybe
there wasn't any director.
It often looks that way. The
film wanders listlessly through
the streets and alleys of Paris
trying to get the actors into bed,
or (see the advertisement) nude
in the shower. Of course, this
sexual permissiveness is ex-
pected, since the leads speak
French, but you've seen the
same fare starring Doris Day
and Rock Hudson.
Henri Plantin (Aznacour) is
the kind of wise, sad bourgeois
who wins the daily double by
betting on his wife's birthday
and their wedding anniversary.
He likes to go fishing on Sun-
day, with his four bachelor
friends. And he doesn't like get-
ting stuck in Paris selling tackle
while his wife goes off on vaca-
tion.
So after at least fifteen years
of married life, Henri goes for
the first pair of legs who drops
her postcard in his patch. Of
course, she is a nice girl, a Pa-
tricia Seagrave (Miss Hamp-

shire), who is trying to forget
an unhappy affair she left be-
hind in London.
The unfortunate thing is
that she really is a nice girl,
well worth the attention of a
better film. Renoir's photog-
raphy plays with her body.
making her innocent and pleas-
ing au naturel as she and Az-
navour scamper - literally --
from the Pantheon to the Place
de la Concorde.
(For apparent lack of any-
thing better to do, the film
often develops into a rather
bad travelogue, which dulls the
City of Lights by filming it in
blurry black and white.)
This is supposedly rather
arty, and the film itself often
appears like melodrama camp:
"You two hide a lot from each
other," the lecherous villain
sneers; "Don't overdonhappi-
ness," the hurt heroine sighs.
"It's hard on your heart."
The only thing we're headed
for is heart throbs-or heart
burn, depending on your in-
clination. Paris in the Month
of August, does, at times, make
a genuine and palatable come-
dy, but it damns itself in con-
stant romantic interludes. The
whole seduction of Miss Hamp-
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
This is a
RemarkablecMotion Picture
Based on fact
20thCenuryFox.
o ETHE
BOSTONO_
STRANGLER
Panavs4or Color o uxeA

shire, engineered by the bache-
lor band, is done with under-
stated humor. And the illicit
lovers have two wild nights to-
gether, during which they make
love five times.
But from that kind of record,
where can you go? Only
through a series of bad puns to
a final, teary farewell at the
airport. They say they'll never
forget each other, but you'll be
able to forget them.

1421 Hill St
8:0P.M.
at the
A Beniefit Performance
for Committee of Responsibility
To aid war-injured
Vietnamese children.
An evening of folk music

NOVEMBER 10
$1.00
1421 Hill

9 P.M.

Studentl
$12.50
Special offer to
accredited colle
to become mene
rate of $12.50A
Privileges lnclu
publications, 2!
Museum books,
sides, reduced
on art magazin
Newsletters, ar
admissions.
t~Department ofD
The Museum o1
11 West 53Stre
New York, N.Y.
Student Membe
Extra pass for h
Make checksp
of Modern Art,
xerox or photos
school Ioor bu
Name (pleasep
Address
C ty StateZip
College or unive

Membership
students at
lges and unliversities
tbers at the reduced
with full privileges.
de4free Museum
5-50% discount on
s,reproductions and
subscription rates
es, monthly Members
nd unlimited free
'Membershipf
AModern Art
eet
10019
ership: $12.50
husband or wife: $2.50
ayable to The Museum
.Plhase enclose a
tat copy of a current
rsar's receipt.

NOW d~IM~!.jDIAL
8-6416
Dedicated to every man who has ever had to
~ ~lie a lot...just
to love a little!

4
t

By JOHN GRAY
In case..you don't know it yet,.
the Buffalo Bpringfield made
two of the most beautiful albums
ever produced before they broke
up this year. They're both on
Atco,. and they're called Buf-.
falo .Springfield Again and Last
Time Around.
The Springfield was an amaz-
ing group - all of the members
were (are) superbly talented
musicians and 'they all work-
ed together, submerging them-
selves into their songs, blend-
ing their talent into something
more .than the total of their in-
dividual performances. Most
groups are dominated by one or
two lead men who make it or
break it-like Morrison's Doors
or Lennon and McCartney's Beat-
les.. Every once in al while a
group comes along that's all
good but the members just can't
work together right - like the
Blues Project or the experi-
mental band on Super Session.
It takes just the right people in.
the right icombination, and the
Springfield had.-it.
Neil Young was a standout in
the Springfield. He wrote, sang
and produced some-of their best,
songs.And now,. like the .other
merbers of the group, he's find-
ing himself as asingle, discover
ing and painting out his
strengths - and weaknesses.
Young is at the Canterbury
House tonight, tand if you
haven't, seem him yet, you
should try to catch the show.
Second class postage paid at Ann
Irbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Ilrbor, ,Wchlgan-48104.
Daily. except. Monday during regular
icademilc echool year.'
ARKILMSOCIETY
Jean Renoir's
THIS LAND
IS MINE
with
Charles Laughton
Moureen O'Hard
George Sanders
MONDAY, NOV. 11,
7:30 P.M.
at the ARK 1421 Hill

ug: It's

He'e doing songs off the Spring-
field albums and off his own
as-yet-unreleased album w i t h
nothing backing him up but his
acoustic guitar.
It's a strong temptation to
say that he made a mistake go-
ing out on his own (this is his
first gig.) He sounds so alone -
his voice doesn't seem to be
made for solo performance. You
get the feeling that you're lis-
tening to a stereo' album with
one speaker disconnected. You
wanted the bass and drums, you
can almost feel the song calling
out for a background, a bridge
that can't be made on an acous-
tic guitar.
But at the same time there's
a very elusive quality to Young's
work that gets lost in a back-
ground, that surprises you when
you get used to him enough to
really feel for it. Hle's somehow
very close, very real - his im-
perfection, like Dylan's, adds to
his brilliance, but in a differ-
ent way. Young seems innocent,

nice ..
questioning, and his songs strain
with his voice, never quite at-
taining the brilliance that you
know is in them, but suggesting
it and outlining it so well that
it doesn't really matter.
Young is at his best on his
simplest songs, notably "I Am
a Child," off Last Time Around.
But even on this, the feeling
that there's something missing,
something that would make it
perfect, remains. Maybe it's just
that he isn't used to solo per-
forming and hasn't ironed out
his act enough, or maybe it
really is a quality of his music
that it needs a complex inter-
pretation to counterpoint t h e
melodic brilliance.
Young is a recording artist,
and his album, created with a
backup in the familiar studio
atmosphere, promises to be an
event. But it's fulfilling, it's
nice, to listen to him in person,.
to hear the musical sketch (not
a rough draft, but a study)
working itself out in front of yog.

print)

iersty

4

DIAL
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Shows at
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A film by PIERRE GRANIER-DEFERRE starring
} CHARLES AZNAVOUR e SUSAN HAMPSHIRE
-TON IGHT
guitarist-singer of the Buffalo Springfield
performing ct
$1.50 at the door; free food
$1.00 after 2nd seta and seats next week
doors open $8:00 prvded.DVDAKE

-

r

THIS IS
THE TRUE STORY
OF THE
SELF-CONFESSED
BOSTON
STRANGLER.

I'

Olga & Mary Esch
Thank You for, your
Support. and Trustj

with
TONY CURTIS

ON STRANGLER
HENRY FONDA

II

Next: "CAMELOT"

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-Next-
BARBARELLA

SHOWS
AT
7:10 & 9:20
1-3-5
FOURTH
WEEK

611111--GUILD
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
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written and directed by Jean-Luc Godard
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Starring ANNA KARINA,
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The story of a Parisienne -..............
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Unlike other classics
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MIRISCI PICTURES presents
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Gie Heat is aGLone1j untec
Subscribe To,
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Phone 764-0558

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THE REVEREND JAMES M. LAWSON, JR.
Chairman of the Black Methodists for Church Renewal
SPEAKING ON
BLACK POWER IN CHRISTIAN PROSPECTIVE
SUNDAY, 7:00 P.M. at
~AI - I .. . U

WE DON'T DISCRIMINATE !
dti
ii

(/( It/
.j
1 '.f
v A
.'-'"'
- r
y~ ,
;+;:
%'.
_
', y:

0

But you'll have to wait your turn!
Gilbert & Sullivan's

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in

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