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November 07, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, November 7, 1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

pmrfis Nino

Th0 dy4oebe ,16 H MCIA AL

rage 1-* ne

.

Democrats retain
'control of Congress

SCHOOL TAX DEFEATED:

Tindal,

Wierzbicki gain seats

(Continued from Page 1)
ing their term of office, but none
has had to start out that way,
before.
In 1916 Woodrow Wilson failed
to bring a Democratic majority
into the House with him, but with
the help of independent party
members the Democrats were able
able to exercise control.
MICHIGAN CONGRESSIONAL
RESULTS BY DISTRICT
" 1st, DISTRICT
X-Conyers (D)
(unopposed)
2nd DISTRICT (92)
X-Esch (R) 84,954
Vivian (D) 71,388
Garskoff (NP) 778
3rd DISTRICT (98)'
E-Brown (R) 106,780
Keenan (D) 57,191
4th DISTRICT (99)
X-Hutchinson (R) 98.433
1Vartin (D) 51,723
5th DISTRICT (100)
X-Ford (R) 104,966
Howard (D) 61,954
6th DISTRICT (92)
X-Chamberlain (R) 93,660
Harrison (D) 54,381
7th DISTRICT (85)
X-Riegle (R) 87,066
Blue (D) 60,438
8th DISTRICT (87)
X--arvey (R) 89,526
4Savis (D) 41,425
9th DISTRICT (91)
X-VanderJagt (R) 90,496
Wabeke (D) 43,612
19th DISTRICT (91)
X-Cedarberg (R) 91,830
Miller (D) 47,920
11th DISTRICT (91)
4-Ruppe (R) 92,560
Clevenger (D) 65,557
12th DISTRICT (95)
X-O'Hara (D) 128,342
Harris (R) 52,979
13th DISTRICT (100)
X-Diggs (D) 81,585
Beauregard (A) 13,061
14th DISTRICT (98)
X-Nedzi (D) 96,514:
O'Rourke (R) 63,574
15th DISTRICT (96) I ;
X'-Ford (D) 99,838'
Boyle :(R) 39,625
16th DISTRICT (98)
--Dingell (D) 104,081
Bona (R) 34,832
17th DISTRICT (100)
X-GriffithsI (D) 123,029
Siviter (R) 40,592
18th DISTRICT (81)
X-Broomfield (R) 105,473
Zemmol (D) 71,422
19th DISTRICT (98)
X-McDonald (R) 100,894
Frink (D) 73,415
A candidate's name in darker
type indicates election.
The figure in parenthesis after,
the district is per cent, of pre-
cincts reporting.
X-before a candidate's name
'denotes incumbent.
Figures. as of 7 p.m.

The Senate gains included Dem-
ocrat. Allen Cranston's capture of
the California seat vacated by Sen.
Thomas H. Kuchel's primary loss
and Iowa's Harold E. Hughes',
taking the seat of retiring Sen.
Bourke B. Hickenlooper.
The Republicans scored their
gains in Arizona, Florida, Mary-
land, Ohio, Oklahoma and Penn-
sylvania. The GOP victory in
Arizona will bring Barry Gold-
water back to the Senate in Jan-
uary.
Among the notable races for
seats in the House was in Ohio's
23rd congressional district, where
incumbents ran. against . each
other: -Democrat Charles A. Vanik
and 83-year-old Republican Fran-
ces Bolton. Vanik won.
Vanik moved into Mrs. Bolton's
district because redistricting had
placed a preponderance of Negroes
in his old Cleveland district. As
expected, Louis Stokes, a brother
of Cleveland's Negro mayor, Carl
Stokes, won in the new district.
Negroes also won in new dis-
tricts in St. Louis and New York
City. Democrat William Clay be-
came Missouri's first Negro con-
gressman and Shirley Chisholm,

in close D
By JIM NEUBACHER
Robert Tindal and Anthony J.
Wierzbicki eked out narrow vic-
tories Tuesday in the race for the
two vacant seats on Detroit's
Common Council.
The balloting ended in a near
four-way tie. Less than two per
cent of the total vote separated'
Tindal and Wierzbicki from de-
feated candidates Blanche Parent1
Wise and David Eberhard.,
Other important Detroit races
ended in a resounding 3-2 defeat
of a school millage proposal, and
the approvals of a change in the
city's fire and police employe pen-
sion plans.
It had been speculated before
the Tuesday balloting that the
race for the council seats would be
a good indicator of the mood of
the city. Wierzbicki, former coun-
cilman and publisher of the now-
defunct Detroit American, has a
long established reputation as a
staunch conservative. Wise, also
a former council member, is con-
sidered equally conservative.
Eberhard and Tindal, on the
other hand, are both considered
liberals. Eberhard is a Lutheran
clergyman active in many neigh-
borhood projects on Detroit's
East Side, while Tindal is the
Executive Secretary of the De-
troit branch of the NAACP.
However, the narrow margins.
separating the candidates, and the
election of one liberal and one
conservative has made a clear
analysis of the mood, bf Detroit
voters nearly impossible.
Apparently, the four-way split
was basically due to voters who
voted for only one candidate to
try to insure his election.
Tindal becomes the second black
on the council, joining the Rev.
Nicholas Hood, who is currently
serving his first term. The council
is now split 5-4 in favor of the
liberals.
The defeat of the Detroit school
millage operating proposal may
pose a serious problem to the
Board of Education-if not now,
certainly by next summer when a
new teacher's contract will have to
be negotiated.
The, proposal would have au-
thorized a 10 mill property tax in-
crease, effective through 1973.
Detroit teachers are expected to
demand at least a $1,500 annual
salary increase next year, since
Detroit's pay scale is at least that
far behind many suburban dis-
tricts.
Because state law requires local
school districts to adopt balanced
budgets, a hike in teacher's sala-
ries will mean school services and
program will have to be cut back.

etroit Council race
The approval of the change in The defeat of the home rule
police and fire employe pension proposal voided the election of 70
plans constitutes a victory for persons to a commission which was
Mayor Jerome S. Cavanaugh. The to draw up a county government
change, which was violently op- charter.
posed by both police and fire as- -Wayne county officers were
sociations. is aimed at motivating won without exception by Dem-
city employes to remain on the job ocrats. Most important of these

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longer.1
Currently, Detroit fire and po-
lice employes may retire after 25
years of service, regardless of age,
at fifty per cent of their full pay.1
Under the new plan, pensions will
be based on two per cent of full
pay for each year of service, and
a minimum age of 55 will be re-
quired for retirement.
Other Wayne county contests of
importance included:
-a proposal to provide fundsf
for establishment of a Wayne
County Community College; de-
feated 334,746 to 200,504 (80% of
returns). Detroit now remains the
only large metropolitan area in
the nation without a two year col-
lege .program.
-a proposal aimed at estab-
lishing county home rule; defeat-
ed. Home rule would have pro-
vided for a more centrailzed coun-
ty government to replace the 40
largely independent a g e n c i e s
which now serve the , county'sE
needs.

races was the contest for Wayne.
County Sheriff. Voters elected in-
cumbent Roman S. Gribbs. who
was appointed last summer to fill
the vacancy left by the resignation
of former sheriff Peter Buback.
Buback resigned after coming
under fire from a local investiga-
ting grand jury for some of nis
actions while in office. , Gribbs
short administration has produced
some tangible reforms, and his
election Tuesday was lauded by,
city and county officials.
Detroit Council
Final Vote
Tindal 163,952 25.8%
Wierzbicki 160,642 125.5%
Wise 155,592 24.7%
Eberhard i 150,981 24.0%
with 100% of the precincts
reporting.

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Adam Clayton Powell
also a Democrat, became the first
woman of her race ever elected
to Congress when she won in New
York.
With Adam Clayton Powell re-
elected in Harlem to the seat
denied him by the 90th Congress,
nine Negroes have been elected to
the 9 1st, a record high.
Another noteworthy winner was
Allard K. Lowenstein, who led a
movement to , deny President
Johnson renomination and played
a key role in getting Sen. Eugene
J. McCarthy to make his presi-
dential bid. Lowenstein, a Demo-
crat making his first try for pub-
lic office, won in a Long Island,
N.Y., district vacated .by a re-
tiring Democratic incumbent.

I iTIRES

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they were designed to be,
you have to take care of
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Until now you needed
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solutions to properly pre-
pare and maintain your
contacts. You would
think that caring for con-
tacts should be as con-

because Lensine is an
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which means that it
blends with the natural
fluids of the eye.
Cleaning your corkacts
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buildup of foreign de-
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soaking your contacts in
Lensine between wear-
ing periods assures you
of proper lens hygiene.
You get a free soaking
case on the bottom of
every bottle of Lensine.
It has been demonstrated
that improper storage be-
tween wearings may
result in the growth of
bacteria on the lenses.
This is a sure cause of
eye irritation and in some
cases can endanger your
vision. Bacteria cannot
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Let your contacts be the
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meant to be. Get some
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.so alike, so inexorably alike:'

This is the season when
millions of members of the.
family of man-of many
faiths-observe solemn
holei dani.

wrote: "Though meanings
vary, we are alike in all
countries.... From tropics
to arctics, humanity lives
with these needs so alike,
sof inpxrnahin fiikpo"

450,000 men and women of
all faiths and creeds. We
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frth,' itkTn.in

" 'al i

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