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August 29, 1968 - Image 63

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-08-29

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Thursday, August 29, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

T h R s d y u u si9 9 6 H I C H G N D I YP g h e

IT

[Ii

Ike no longer 'critical'
WASHINGTON OP) -- Doctors artery disease, his present con

adf-

The University of AMichigan
GILBERT
and
SULLIVAN
SOCIETY
MASS

for'former president Dwight D.
Eisenhower said last night they
no longer consider his immediate
condition as critical
But his overall situation follow-
ing his seventh heart.attack Aug.
16 is serious, they said.
In response to questions from
reporters the doctors said it is not
yet possible 'to say whether Eisen-
hower will be able to lead a rela-I
tively 'normal life in ,the event he
recovers.
The doctors at the Army's Wal-
ter Reed General Hospital said:I
"Because of the extent of Gen
Eisenhower's underlying coronar y
'f . Y.\...... f.***....

Wl V Ij %440 "Q%" llU II Ctll:llV4,

tion must still be considered seri-
ous, albeit not necessarily critical
at this time. The long range out-
I look is still guarded and the po-
tential for sudden reversal of the
current favorable trend is ever
present."
The doctors said that "critical"
refers to severity of illness where
the immediate outcome is in
doubt
"In the General's condition
where a number of days have
elapsed since the last occurence of
life threatening rapid heart action
we no longer view the immediate
situation as critical but still view
the overall disease as 'serious,"
they shid.

MEET

G

Lose Somneth In JAiIJI I UI LL UY
Los, 5t71tfl iYl u nnoer asgone lour tdays
without suffering a recurrence of
Find it with a major heart rhythm disturbances.
The doctors said that they at-
tribute Eisenhower's apparent ral-
D l lSly to a combination of medical
treatment and- what they called
. the natural recovery process.

Kre mlii
MOSCOW ()-The Soviet press
hinted yesterday that the Kremlin
is bearing down on Czechoslo-
vakia's leaders to purge outspoken
advocates of the country's reform
movement.
Two newspapers charged that
"enemies of the people"-a term
used in past Soviet-inspired purges
-were still operating in Czecho-
slovakia despite the occupation by
Soviet bloc troops.;
Singled out as targets were
Czechoslovakia's free radio sta-
tions and a leading Czechoslovak
force for further liberalization,
a political group called Club 231.
This is a group of previously,
purged persons who were reha-
bilitated during the Czechoslovak
liberalization drive earlier this
year, and had been urging the
government to expand "their re
In the first major Soviet com-
ment on the four-day talks be-
tween Soviet and Czechoslovak
leaders in Moscow, Pravda com-
mentator Yurt Zhukov wrote that
"measures were worked out that
will favor the elimination of the
menace to socialism.''
He did not spell out those A
measures, but implied in an article A C
in the Communist party news- street
paper that they involved strong
actions against the previously un-o D
censored Czechoslovak news media DO'
and unnamed individuals he la-
beled "enemies of the Czechdnd
Slovak people."
Khukov complained that "nu-
merous clandestine transmitters
are continuing to operate." It de-
nounced these radio stations for
supporting new, liberal ;ruling e
bodies of the Czechoslovak party
elected at a secret congress after SAIGC
the Soviet bloc in-vasion.I

demand
1 assails

and

11

TRYOUTS
for
~THE

GONDOLIERS
THURSDAY 29 AUGUST
7:15 P.M., 3RS MICHIGAN UNION

"A STUNNING, BEAUTIFULLY MADE FILM-
ONE THAT YOU WILL NOT FORGET!"
-Judith Cr~st. NBC-TV Today Show
"SO BEAUTIFULLY AND THOUGHTFULLY MADE!
There are moments of great suspense... everything,
every sound is a threat. The use of music and
sound...is very effective and delicate. Brynych
becomes With this movie quite simply one of the,
best directors we have!"
.-.at Adler, New York Timos
"EXCEPTIONALLY POWERFUL IN BOTH
CONCEPT AND EXECUTION! A HIGH LEVEL OF
CREATIVE CINEMA!"
-Tme Mogor--
"DAZZLING AND TO THE POINT!"
-pnelope Gilot, T, he N.w Yorker
"BRILLIANT! REMARKABLE!"
-Joseph Morgenuten, Newsweek
a ,FEW FILMS ARE WORTHY-OF BEING CALLED
ARTISTIC. THIS IS ONE! Brilliantly accomplished!"
r -Moths Alp.rt, Saturday R. iow

-Ass
LUMN OF SOVIET TANKS line up yesterday
near Old Town Square in Prague.

EAD

1.S. bombing lrn yt , un

PRAGE (a- Ter, eh
pull- out;
dryefotdrmsstindead
Condemnin
as cupato
illegal
~ '~ PRAGUE (A'---'The Czecho-
Inslovak National Assembly yester-
day adopted aresolution demand-d
ing a 'firm deadline for the with-
drasal of Soviet-led occupation
troops and condemning the occ-
. pation as illegal.
Informants said the National
SAssemblyalso declared it could
=h not ratify the Moscow agreem'ent
pbecause it was reached under
oc.td Press ere, was no immediate? 1'e-
.in pot from a secret meeting of the
.,Communist party Central Cor-
.' mittee of its position on the Mos-
cow accord that continues the oc-
cupation and has forced the
Czechoslovak regime to rein u
Son its liberalizing program.
But sources indicated that op-
~ position to ,the terms of the settle-
ociahd Press ment was hardening rapidly e-
in a side spite appeals by AlexanderDb-
cek, the party leader, andPresis-
mdent Ludvik gvoboda Tuesday for
Czechoslovak understanding while
they work to end the occupation.
Dubcek was expected to address
the Central Committee meeting
S Veat the clandestine Communist
.t s headquarters.
ILLEGAL
th. h h "The National Assembly s con-
tinues to regard the occupatior
rs of the Czechoslovak Socialist Re-
public. by forces of five states of
the Warsaw Pact as Illegal andl as
e Viet Cong violating international treatesr
outh Viet- the U.N. charter and the Warsaw
ounded five act, said a Free Prague raio
It was the broadcast.I
th that the "The National Assemblyis con
vinced that our armed forces are
nemy gun- capable of security of our western
A bigmU.S. frontierand calls on the govern-
I Nang 7and ment to insist the fuing of ard
t fire slam- adherence to concrete datksfor
,ck barrage, the withdrawal of foreign troops.
dualties sand "At the same time we maintain
at the 4th that all our citizens who hae
base, about been illegally detaned and im-
sf Da Nang. prisoned by 'Czechoslovak and
B52 bomb- foreign organs since Aug. 24 should'
ions against be released."
ions in s the SHOWDOWN TALKS
The assembly statement reaf-
flew. 10o 7 firmed *support of Dubcek's r-
the North, fomist leadership and thanked
U.S. hpead- Czechoslovak leaders for their ef-
rday. Pilots forts atthe showdown talksidn
r damaging Moscow. It also added that the
seven fires "National Assembly is convinced
S dumps thats this country's only plae is
ie the community of Socialist na-
ed anuun- etions." tsv.
plane was Reformist sources said that
yesterday Dubeek has been asked to deny
irters main- rumors he' Yielded to 'Soviet de-
omnmenting mands to declare the special 14th
f.ned flights party congress illegal. The con-
gress met secretly last weeka and
,elected a liberal CentralComit-
tee replacing onemthat stil in-
cluded a strongconsrvative wg.
Informants said there sas grow-
ing opinion that Dbcek hould be
voted outof office if he confirmed
the rumor. This could result in
two rival central committees 'with
reformists holding membership Int
both.
The congress of the Slvak
Communist party also was under
way at Bratislava with increasing
signs 'that delegates would sup-
port reformist efforts to oust Vasil
Bilak, the orthodox first Slova1
' secretary.

ON (M) - More than 3001
Jipnme t tn hpl md t

I

I.

COME ONE!
COME ALL!
G&S is the U-M's ONLY
YEAR-ROUND MUSICAL
THEATER GROUP
and
We are planning now for
our next two G&S shows
plus a hit-Broadway musical!
So-JOIN US NOW
and get in on the
Ground Floor!

I

Presents
INGMAR'
BERGMAN'S
THE,
{SEVENTH-
(1956)
"God is dead or
death isGod"
7:00 & 9:05
Thursday and Friday
ARCHITECTURE AUD.

iJorn Viena.mese roops eLa ou
in bunkers against a heavy allied
air and Artillery bombardment
yesterday night after losing 84
dead in a battle with U.S. air cav-
alrymen along an infiltratiori
route northwest of Saigon.
U.S. 'headquarters said Jets,
helicopter gunships and artillery
were supporting troops of the
101st Air Cavalry Division battling
to dislodge the enemy force in
jungled terrain 34 'miles north-
west of Saigon. American casual-
ties were termed light.'
'The presence of North ,Viet-
namese troops so close to Saigon,
coupled with fresh rocket attacks
on the capital, gave rise to new
unconfirmed reports of an im-
pending -enemy assault against
Saigon.
Several hundred police swept
through the heart of Saigon as
a 10 p.m. curfew went into ef-
fect. They searched buildings and
checked residents' identification
papers, presumably looking for
enemy infiltrators,
Artillery barrages were heavier
than usual along the southern
fringes of the capital, particularly

near a slum area wher
rockets killed three S
namese civilians and wi
others early yesterday
third time in two mon
city was shelled
Far to the no th, e
ners opened up onA
supply base near Dan
sent 10 rounds of"rocke
ming in during a qui
First reports said cas
damage were light a
Logistics Command b
two miles northwest o
In the air war; U.S.-
ers flew 11 more missic
suspected enemy posit
South.
U.S. strike planes'
missions Tuesday over
Vietnamese Panhandle
quarters reported yeste
reported destroying or
20 trucks{and setting;
indicating ammuniti
were hit.
Radio Hanoi claim
manned AmericanI
downed over Hanoi
morning. V.S. headqua
tains a policy of not c
on reports of unman
over the North.'

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION

STARTS
TODAY

1

FOX EASTERN THEATRE-
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375 N MAPLE RD. "764~340

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We Need}
SINGERS
ACTORS
DANCERS
TECH CREWS
and
t/
OUR ALL-CAM PUS
ORCHESTRA
NEEDS MUSICIANS
to play for
4 The Gilbert & Sullivan Society
* MUSKET '69
* Ann Arbor Junior Light Opera
* Ann Arbor Civic Theater

NOW in its FOURTH WEEK!

I

7

I

Paramount Pictures Presents
MiaFarrow
In a William Castle Production
wfa s
,s~tm

I

Il

I

110 1

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