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November 05, 1968 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-05

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I
Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesdov. November 5.1968

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY TaIsa4Arv t'Jr~vpmhi~ir ' 1 Q~

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Badgei
By FRED LaBOURI
This fine nation's Badger Boost-'
ers, an organization drawing its
membership largely from the now
defunct Nancy Comic Strip So-
cieyt, got a heavy shot in the arm
last Saturday in lovely Madison,,
as the sometime hapless Wiscon-
sin eleven rose up and nearly beat
beat BEAT Indiana, 21-20.
This Tuesday morning is no,
time to use paltry adjectives to
describe Wisconsin's earthshaking
performance on their way to their
17th straight loss against the
Hoosiers. For although the Bad-
gers outplayed their opponents in
nearly every category of statistical
importance, (gaining nearly twice
as many first downs, twice as
much rushing and passing yard-
age, losing only one fumble to In-
diana's six), past experience help-
ed them come out on the short
end of the stick again.
Yes, mighty Wisconsin fought
(actually fought!) its way back
from a 14-0 and 21-7 deficits to
score twice in the fourth quarter
of the, game. But on a desperate
do-or-die no-holds-barred try to
win the game, the Badgers tried
a two point conversion which fail-1
ed by inches.
What spirit! What faith! What
a cereal! In the tradition of such
all-time great losers as Harold
Stassen and Seymour Lindgren,
Wisconsin gave up a tie in an at-
tempt to pick up all the marbles,]
for one day anyway.
(Postcript: Wisconsin wasn't all
golden, wonder however. They
NHL Standings.]
East Division(

narrowly

avert win

Sports Beat Sports Beat Sports Beat
s ~ fl Dillvel eu* !

managed to eke out six missed
field goals.)
Another important Big Ten tilt
(We might note here that a Big
Ten game that is important to
one might not be important to
another, but for the sake of
minority recognition, if a game is
important to any, we will mention
it as important) took place in
polluted Columbus, where Michi-
gan State almost toppled a hearty
foe for the second week in a row.'
The Spartans, despite a second
half surge, couldn't quit get it all
together, however, and the for-
tunate Ohio State Buckeyes beat
them 25-20. MSU was looking to
upset another vaunted team after
last week's Notre Dame spectacle
but fumbles (four lost) and inter-

ceptions (thr
effort.
As State dr(
the fourth qua
have been the
quarterback B
and the Spart
The fortuna
up 429 yardsc
coach Woody7
passing game1
ies off. "Mic
best team we
son," said th
after the gam
Up in Minn
mayored by H
was beatingf
from Minneso
time the Haw
victory in ten
Stadium turf.

ee) hampered their Iowa bestirred itself to great
heights after going behind at one
ove down the field in point in the second quarter 20-7.
arter for what would Larry Lawrence was the central
winning six points, bestirrer for the Corn Kings with
Bill Triplett fumbled, his touchdown jaunts of one, four,
ans were broiled. eight, and nine yards.
ate Buckeyes racked According to those who attend
on offense, as crafty the game, it wasn't much of an
Hayes switched to a afternoon as Minnesota was
to throw the Green- shackled by Iowa's defense until
higan State is the the end of the fourth quarter when
've played this sea- they managed to punch across
e omniscient Hayes their last TD.
ne. But that hardly completes last
neapolis, a city once week's slate of action in the West-
lerb Humphrey, Iowa ern Conference, as the Purdue or
the meaty Gophers Ilinois fans will tell you.
ota 35-28, the first These twoteams met in La-
'keyes have rolled~ to fayette Saturday, and the six-
years on Memorial ranked Boilermakers came out on
top, 35-17.

BOWLING GREEN BOMBED:
31M' frosh: Potent and poised

-Associated Press
OHIO STATE'S MIKE RADTKE (55) finally hauls in Michigan
State's Don Highsmith after one of his punt returns in the
second period of Saturday's contest. With the number of fumbles
the Spartans had, it's almost surprising he didn't drop the ball.

Michigan's freshman football
team traveled to Bowling Green
last Friday hoping to leave with
a mere victory. What they did,
however, exceeded even the most
optimistic hopes of Wolverine fol-
lowers, shredding the Falcons, 43-
6.
Bowling Green, a team which
had the benefit of two games pre-
vious experience, was simply an-
nihiliated by a Michigan team
playing its first football game of
the season.
The Wolverines drew' first blood
late in the first quarter on a 13-
yard Dennis Connell to Tom Hus-
kins touchdown strike and were
never headed. Before the half end-
ed Michigan added three more
touchdowns and a safety for good
measure to open up a 30-0 lead.
Coach Bill Dodd showed mercy
toward the Falcons in the second
half, as the reserves took com-
mand of the offensive unit. How-
ever, the young Wolverines s t i11
struck for two more scores before.
the final kun.
This game was not a case of one
team using its dominance in one
facet of the game to pulverize the
opposition - Michigan can boast
statistics demonstrating superior-
ity in all areas.

Coach Bill Dodd's game plan
of controlling the ball was car-
ried out to the letter, as the Wol-
verines ran 82 plays, nearly double
Bowling Green's 47. The rushing
attack, spearheaded by tailback
Billy Taylor, ground out 321 yards
in a devastating performance, but
the surprise of the game was the
passing efficiency.
Dodd, who generally sticks to
the ground game, had his charges
put the ball in the air 18 times,
completing only 8. However, those
passes went for a lot of mileage,
covering 166 yards total.
Included were the initial scoring
strike and a 21 yard touchdown

toss from Bruce Elliott to B o b
Rosema in the last minute of the
first half.
In passing the accolades among
the frosh, one cannot overlook the
superior effort of the defensive
unit, which even managed to score
one touchdown of its own. All it
did was hold Bowling Green to
75 yards total offense, including
>nly one first down in the decisive
first half.
An encouraging note for the
Wolverine fans is that Dana Coin
made five of six conversion at-
tempts, a reversal of recent Mich-
igan tradition.

W L T Pts.GFGA
7 2 1 15 32 1.81

Montreal
New York
Boston
Chicago
Toronto
Detroit
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Oakland
Los Angeles
Minnesota
Pittsburgh

Professional Standings I

On the road to Pasadena ....
Rose Bowl fever is rampant in Ann Arbor.
There's no use denying it-every football fan at Michigan is
speculating on the showdown match in Columbus three weeks from
now. Likewise, everyone keeps reminding himself that we still have
two games to go before that one.
Five weeks ago, no one thought that the Wolverines would be
title-bound after seven games. And even after the victory over Michi-
gan State, many just kept waiting for the bubble to burst.
For those who may still be waiting, don't hold your breath.
There isn't going to be any letdown by the 1968 Wolverines.
For one thing, there really isn't any bubble to burst. The
Maize and Blue have been high ever since their first bitter drag
on the California reefer opening day.
Michigan isn't the kind of team that gets "up" so noticeably for
any particular game-it's up -for all of them. When the Wolverines
go out on the field to play a team of roughly equal strength (MSU,
Indiana, Minnesota), they do it with one conscious purpose in mind.
Murder.
Cold, calculated, premeditated murder.
If there is anything in common about the six straight Michigan
victories so far this year, it is that two teams were pretty evenly-
matched clubs beforehand--on paper. Michigan is far from a power-
house. There simply isn't a whole lot of All-American material wearing
Blue this year.
Nevertheless, once the game gets under way, the Wolverines
are in command. In all four Big Ten wins, Michigan tallied
the first touchdown. And, as exemplified by the fourth quarter
scores against Michigan State and Indiana, the offense has the
ability to come through in the clutch,
But enough is being written about the offense by everybody.
Dennis Brown, Ron Johnson, Garvie Craw, Jim Mandich. Enough said.
It's the defense that is 6-1. Goss, Seymour, Hill, Parks, Pryor,
Stincic and Moore are the mainstays of the tackling crew. Goss, Hill,
Pryor and Moore, have been the most consistent. Killian, Pierson,
Newell, Miklos, and McCoy have also been reliable performers,
The defensive backfield firm of Curtis, Hoey, Healy-Wedge,
and. Hartman has been good, as expected.
. . with two unheralded All-Am
The two standouts, though, have to be Curtis and Goss. Neither
has had a bad game. Both get better every week Despite stiff na-
tional competition, Curtis may be headed for an all-American tag. He
needs one more interception to break his own Big Ten mark of seven
(shared, by the way, with everyone and his brother, so conference
statisticians will be glad if he breaks it.)
Goss hasn't gotten the publicity, from the local press or from
the football coaches to warrant much of a chance, but he certainy
merits attention by those seeking a clue to Michigan's succes this
year.
And while we're considering unsung heroes, there's always the
entire offensive line, which is helping Ron Johnson set the all-time
Michigan rushing record. (He needs only 183 more to eclipse Tom
Harmon'slong-standing mark of 2134.)
Especially foremost have been Stan Broadnax and Bob Penksa,
senior blockers who have been effective against everybody.
Dave Denzin, long-time understudy of Joe Dayton, has slpped
in the starting center shoes competently; and soph Dan Dierdorf
and junior Dick Caldarazzo (and his alter ego, Jack Harpring) are
surprising starters who were 'ranked in the 'inexperienced' category
during pre-season practice.
Finally, fankers John Gabler and Paul Staroba, alon with split
ends Billy Harris and Jerry Imsland round out the high-flying pass-
receiving corps.
And let's not forget the consistent punting of Mark Werner.
Or the blocking of Warren Sipp. Or the kickoffs by Frank Titas.
Or the fabulous tackler on the kickoff squad-Alan Francis.
Of the second-string performers, quarterback Don Morhead,
halfback Lance Scheffler (one touchdown to date), flanker JiM Betts,
fullback Greg Harrison, linebacker Marty Huff, middle guard Jim
Wilhite (from Bay City), defensive end Ed Woodley, tight end Mike
Hankwit and tackle Werner Hall have been excellent. Many others
have turned in better than adequate performances.
The rest all have a good attitude.

7
7
6
4
3

3
4
4
3
4

0
0
0
1
1

West Division,
4 51
3 6 2
3 5 1
3 6 1
35 2

14
14
12
9
7
9
8
8
7
7
6

37
34
45
20
28
31
21
25;
20
24
21

24
26
35
21
26
27
27
37
35
20
32

AMERICAN LEAGUE

New York
Houston
Boston
Miami
Buffalo
Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver
Cincinnati

Eastern Division
W L T Pct. Pts. OP
6 2 0 ..750 231 177
4 5 0 .444 168 158
3 5 0 .375 128 217
2 5 1 .286 138 217
1 7 1 .125 128 243
Western Division

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Eastern Conference

What kind of man reads GENERATION?
THE PLAYBOY
GENERATION
Campus inter-arts magazine
ON SALE BEGINNING NOV. 7
includes
ART
DRAMA
POETRY
FICTION,
ESSAY
PHOTOGRAPHY

Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled.
Today's Games
No gamnes scheduled.

y

7
6
6
4
2

2
2
7

0
0
0
0
0

.778 230 124
.750 253 130
.750 242 153
.500 140 181
.222 140 198

Capitol Division
W L T Pct. Pts. OP
Dallas 7 1 0 .875 247 95
New York 5 3 0 .625 198 173
Washington 3 5 0 .375 147 221
Philadelphia 0 8 0 .000 115 240
Century Division
St. Louis 5 3 0 .625 205 175
Cleveland 5 3 0 .625 182 161
New Orleans 3 5 0 .375 144 177
Pittsburgh 2 6 0 .250 133 207
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Coastal Division
W L T Pct. Pts. OP
Baltimore 7 1 0 .875 239 98
Los Angeles 7 1 0 .875 180 101
San Francisco 4 4 0 .500 158 173
Atlanta 1 7 0 .125 113 260
Central Division
Minnesota 4 4 0 .500 189 137
Chicago 4 4 0 .500 140 203
Green Bay 3 4 1 .429 164 129
Detroit 3 4 1 A429 144 148

U'

IR9

MA9

North Campus Committee
presents
"AN ALL CAMPUS
Brdge Tourney"1
SIGN-UP IN PERSON
Nov. 6-Nov. 8
UAC offices-2nd floor Union

Sunday's Results
New York 25, Buffalo 21
Denver 35, Boston 14
Houston 27, Cincinnati 17
Oakland 38, Kansas City 21
San Diego 34, Miami 28
Sunday's Games
Houston atyNew York
Kansas City at Cincinnati
Miami at Buffalo
Oakland at Denver
San Diego at Boston

Coeds:
"Let us style a
FLATTERING HAIR CUT
to your individual needs."
No Appointment Needed
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

Sunday's Results
Baltimore 26, New York 0
Chicago 13, Green Bay 10
Cleveland 33, San Francisco 21
Dallas 17, New Orleans 3
Los Angeles 10, Detroit 7
Minnesota 27, Washington 14
Pittsburgh 41, Atlanta 21
St. Louis 41, Philadelphia 17

Sunday's Games
Baltimore at Detroit
Green Bay at Minnesota
Los Angeles at Atlanta
New Orleans at Cleveland
New York at Dallas
Pittsburgh at St. Louis
San Francisco at Chicago
Washington at Philadelphia

YsA

ENTRY FEE 50c

I' '

213 S. STATE ST.
FORMERLY CAMPUS DISCOUNT
NO GAMES
NO GIMMICKS
COLGATE ONE-A-DAY TABU OR AMBUSHS
TOOTHPASTE VITAMINS SPRAY COLOGNE BRECK SHAMPOO
Family WITH IRON
Size c eg Reg q
RepReg. Pint size
Reg.U 100 for 2 oz.for a$1,89
5$8 $3.29 96. $49 9c
Limit 1Exp. 1/ 11/68 Limit I Exp. 11/11/68 Limit 1. Exp. 11/11/68 Limit 1 Exp. 11/11/68
BARBASOL BRECK
SHAVE BOMB CREAM RINSE FACIAL TISSUE LAVORIS
11o. Jc . 9 5 Req. Reg.0 c Reg oz
8. 200-count56 314 Va7ue
Limit 1 Exp. 11/11/68 Limit 1 Exp. 11/11/68 Limit 1 Exp.11/11/68 Limit 1 Exp. 11/11/68
RIGHT GUARD or BAN 100-COUNT
Spray Deodorant MEDS TAMPONS ENVELOPES MASKING TAPE
Extra Dry
Reg
Box of640 934"x
Reg,. Plus 10 e. ~2160"
$1.29 $1.59 Rg 8

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY

Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Thea

presents
KEEP TIGHTLY CLOSED IN A COOL 0
and
EX-MISS COPPER QUEEN ON A SETI
both by MEGAN TERRY
NOVEMBER 6th & 7th
ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Building

4:10 P.M.
tre
RY PLACE
OF PILLS
ADMISSION FREE
9

I

i

.

T((i

ITaro

UNION~

I

LEAGUE UNION-LE
[LEGUESIGN UP FOR
EUROPEAN CHARTER FLIGHTS
STARTING AT 9:00-First Come First Serve
UAC Offices, 2nd Floor Union
FLIGHT 1
MAYA-JUNE 1 B Sbena
Detroit-London Brussels-Detroit

A~GUE

TOE

I1

I

TOMORROW
FLIGHT 2
MAY 8-AUG. 17 Sabena
New York-London Brussels-New York
THURSDAY
FLIGHT 3
JUNE 29-AUG. 14 Pan Am
New York-London Paris-New York

ru~rV IrUCC CATE EDCC

o)1

%oa h

El LU~o 1 nc3 I rcA I1I VKC

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