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November 05, 1968 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-05

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Tuesday, November 5,' 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Verge Seven

Tuesday, November 5, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Poac Seven

I I

UNREST PLAGUES JAPAN:
Rampaging students battle for reform

TOKYO (MP-Dressed in steel large; professors, though fre-
helmets, carrying baskets of rocks quently incompetent, cannot be
and bludgeons, they are spoiling removed, and tuition is rising/an-
for a fight. They usually get it. nually.
Extremist students in more than Bighess-and maladministration
50 Japanese universities have -were the sparks that touched'
been on a rampage for months. off the flames at the privately run
they have beaten professors, Nihon Daigaku, a superuniversity
locked in school presidents, battled with 80,000 students.
police and inflicted millions of Student movements long had
dollars indamage. been banned on campus. But when

They observedInternational
A ntiwar DaMy Monday by staging
a small war of their own.
In Tokyo, they wrecked the
busy Shlnjuku rail hub, smash-
ing windows, setting fire to buses
and buildings, ripping out train
signals, tearing up track ties.
Like pike-carrying foot soldiers
of medieval armies, they met po-
lice--similarly attired in heavy
protective clothing and carrying
nets--in head-on clashes. When
the smoke and turmoil subsided,
340 police and students had been
injured---some seriously-and 928
had been arrested.
At least a million commuters
had to walk or take other means
of transportation as two of To-
kyo's main rail lines were para-
lyzed the next morning.
The harassed Tokyo metropo-
itan police board invoked the riot
act for the first time in 16 years;
under. it, ringleaders can get up to
10 years in prison.
In the past 10 months, about
4000 demonstrating students have
been arrested throughout the
country. They include members of
4t the national Zengakuren student
association, so far out they con-
temptuously dismiss Mao Tse-
tung as too namby pamby. Other
thousands come from institutions
considered so Tconservative no one
bothered organizing them politic-
ally.J
The Antiwar Day demonstrators
were led by Zengakuren extre-
mists who oppose the Vietnam
war, want V..S. forces to get out
of Japan, and regard Primq Min-
ister Eisaku Sato's Liberal Dem-
ocratic government as reactionary.
They get little public support
and almost none from more mod-
erate but less vocal students who
are a majority of Japan's 1.5 mnil-
lion undergraduates.
Most of Japan's student mal-
contents are aroused by problems
closer to home'
4 Some want to be consulted on
the elections of university presi-
dents; others insist on running
student association buildings, still
others demand "democratization'!
of the university administration.
There is also a general student
feeling that somehow they are not
getting' what they should out of
a university career. Classes are too

on April 15 the Tokyo tax admin-
istration disclosed that it had
spent 2 billion yen-$5,555,555-
between 1963 and 1967 in secret
extra payments to directors and
professors, the students exploded.
Why, they asked, hadn't rome-
thing been done to improve their
own classroom conditions?
Some classes had as many as
4,000 students, so unwieldy many,
stayed away. There were more
part-time lecturers than full-time
professors and instructors com-
bined.
In a 12-hour confrontation with

12,000 undergraduates Oct. 1,
Chancellor Jujiro Furata and the
board of directors promised to
make sweeping concessions, cean
up the administration and, to cap
it all, resign in a group.
But the next day Furata and
directors announced they had
withdrawn their resignations. This
set the stage for prolongation of
the six-month-old dispute. Stu-
dent political activists from the
Zengakuren moved in to school the
inexperienced "revolutionaries" in
violent tactics. Their first step was
to call Furata a leader of "Japan-
ese imperialists." -
A similarly nonpolitical issue
aroused the students of prestigious
Tokyo University, which has pro-
duced most of Japan's prime min-
isters. The tempest broke ii an
unlikely area: the medical depart-
ment, to rebellion against a new
law which required young doctors
to undergo a two-year internship
at low monthly salaries..

The medical students went on
strike but got little sympathy from1
fellow students. Then President
Kazuo Ikichi called in riot police
to oust a group occupying the ad-
ministration offices, and the en-
tire student body rallied behind
the medical students.
Academic activities ground to a
halt for the first time in the uni-
versity's 91-year history Oct. 12
when the law faculty joined nine
others already on strike.
The student strike craze reach-
ed as unlikely a place as Keio
University, long regarded as a
stronghold of the pro-American
wealthy class. Last Sunday its
president, Kunio Nagasawa, said
either classes would have to be
resumed soon or all 11,000 under-
graduates would have to take
make up courses.
Classes have been suspended
since July in a protest against
Keio's acceptance of U.S. military
funds for research.

THE WALK
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featuring imported gifts, clothing
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1031 E. Ann, near the hospitals
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Chemical
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Physicist

ENGINEERING SCIENCE

ENGINEERS
SCIENTISTS
ADMINISTRATIVE
TECHNICAL PERSONNEL
OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITIES IN:

ADMINISTRATIVE/
TECHNICAL
Computer Programmer/
Analyst
Accountants
Management Trainees

If you are interested in a challenging and rewarding career, see
the recruiter repesenting the U. S. NAVAL AMMUNITION DE-
POT, CRANE, INDIANA, who will be on campus 6 November
1968 to interview students for career Civil Service employment.
REGISTER with the Placement Office at the earliest opportunity.
SALARIES for Engineers and Sc ientists start at $620.00 and
$756.00 per month, plus all Civil Service Benefits.
U. S. NAVAL AMMUNITION DEPOT
CRANE, INDIANA
EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

ENGINE ERING SENIORS!
Are you interested in working in ultra-sophisticated programs in research,
development, design, and limited manufacture of missiles, satellites, airborne
computers, radar, telemetry, data links, and related systems?
Would you like to be part of a fast-moving professional team with virtually
unlimited opportunities in your chosen field?
If your professional interests lie in the areas of circuit development, micro-
wave, and microcircuit applications; or test and evaluation of avionics
and aerospace systems; or in electro-mechanical devices and electronic
packaging and you are a senior in Electrical, Mechanical or Industrial
Engineering, or Physics; then the place for you is -
NAVAL AVIONICS FACILITY, INDIANAPOLIS.
NAFI representatives will be interviewing on your campus. WEDNESDAY
NOVEMBER 13, 1968
Why not sign up now for an interview? See your Placement Office.

for action in your career?

Look to Bendix. You'll find an excitement
that's unique to' our pursuit of technical
firsts.
Bendix offers you diversified scientific
and engineering opportunities-careers in
research and application engineering, data
processing and business administration.
You'll become a creative problem-solver
serving the aviation, automation, oceanics,
aerospace, automotive and electronics in-
dustries. You'll help create, develop and

produce new systems, new products, new
techniques.
You'll also meet up with a lot of fresh
ideas-a continual "cross-pollination" of
technologies between Bendix groups.
And whichever Bendix division or sub-
sidiary you choose, you'll find it offers
small-company concern and personal
recognition. As well as the chance to
continue your education.
You'll also enjoy the security of a diverse

billion-dollar corporation whose sales have
doubled since 1959. A healthy balance of
commercial and defense business. And a
research and development program that
assures continued growth. Ours and yours.
Stop in at your placement office to sign
up for a Bendix interview and get a copy of
Bendix Career/Opportunities, our directory
of current openings. An equalopportunity
employer.
Campus Interviews Nov. 7 & 8

GENEROUS FRINGE BENEFITS
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

U. S. CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED

VI
WHATEVER ELSE
YOU DO
.........
VOTE ~ ~~v. FOs'OIEI HEFTR
CONYBADO UEVSR
.4:A)?P4 7txlITIT 2d5nd

Where ideas unlock the future
Maybe
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