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November 05, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-05

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Tuesday, November 5, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, November 5, 1963 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

THE THEME OF CAMPAIGN '68:
'The name of the game is heckling

By BERNARD GAYZER
Associated Press Staff Writer
No candidate was spared it.
Some had to tilt with all the
typical tactics of heckling the gibe,
the taunt, the insult, the rude
questions.
Heckling had become a fixture
of the 1968 presidential campaign.
It was contagious and the way
*t seemed to pop up raised sus-
picions that perhaps heckling was
part of a plot, or that people were
being paid to do it. No other mod-
ern American political campaign
has had heckling on such a scale.
"The whole thing is sparked and
led by the Communists," con-
Sluded Gen. Curtis E. LeMay, vice
presidential candidate of Gov.
George C. Wallace's American In-
dependent party.
And Vice President Hubert H.
Humphrey told one rally: "I think
you should just as well know that
there's a determined effort being
*aade in this country today by a
very small group of well-disci-
plined, highly organized people
who have m de it their business
to interrupt 'me."
He named no names. Nor did
LeMay.
$ut a reporter who traveled
thousands of miles with five of
the six presidential and vice presi-
dential candidates-LeMay was in
Vietnam at the time-could find
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no evidence that even the most
active and irritating of hecklers
dogged the heels of any candidate,
or that the themes were settby
any single secret group, or that
hidden financing was provided by
a conspiracy.
Nor was any such evidence, so
far as is known, uncovered by the
nation's two prime intelligence
and investigative agencies: the
FBI and Secret Service.
"I'm sure the Communists like
the disorder as they would like
anything that serves to hurt the
image of America," says a key
FBI agent who cannot be named,
"but as far as evidence indicates
this just is not their show."
"My personal feeling is that
you can't be as organized as the
hecklers are without money, time,
talent and strategy," says a Secret
Service agent, "but I don't have
anything to go on as far as tying
everybody together. There are
leaders, all right, but I can't say
there is any special meaning to
that."
The Secret Service has 24-hour
details with each of the candi-
dates and each team makes full
reports on all events relating to
security problems. If any known
hecklers posed a threat, special
steps would be taken to keep them
from possible contact.
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Individuals who have made
threats have been placed in " pro-
tective security" when the can-
didate is in their area. Several
leaders of various radical move-
ments say they know of no cases
of radicals and hecklers getting
such treatment.
The similar tactics and the
speed with which a slogan or sign
moves across the country raised
suspicion that perhaps all these
things have been masterminded.
But this is mainly the product of
America's highly sophisticated
communications technology.
A chant in Syracuse, N.Y., may
be instantly transmitted in sound
and photographs, or recorded on
tape, and turn up on the 6 o'clock
news across the country and all
the hamlets between.
The chant is heard that evening
in Alamogordo, N.M. News media
rapidly transmit stories and
photos, broadcasters relay reports
or interviews or the sound of the
hecklers themselves. That is, all
the permissible stuff. A sign read-
ing "Wallace is Rosemary's Baby,"
or "Dump the Hump" or "Agnew
Gesundheit" moves quickly.
The four-letter ones are gener-
ally reported in the underground
press, and move across the coun-
try more slowly.
Wallace often has used hecklers
to his own advantage, taunting
them, assuring them that t h e i r
actions only earn him votes. Hes
refers to them as "long-haired an-
archists."
Muskie, the Democratic vice
presidential candidate, occasion-
ally handled them by allowing
hecklers speaking time - and
usually the hecklers were o u t -
classed. Humphrey sometimes has
lectured them, sometimes explod-
ed, and apparently emerged from
determined interruptors with some
sympathy.
Richard M. Nixon, the Repub-
lican presidential nominee, has
had comparatively few hecklers.
His running mate, Spiro T. Ag-
new, has had plenty. At times he's
lectured them and told them to be
ashamed of themselves.
There are the antiwar hecklers,
and Black Power and Black Pan-
ther hecklers - who began action
against Wallace rather later in
the campaign - and radicals like
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the Yippies. They all heckled Wal-
lace, although for different rea-
sons.
"We know our actions help re-
inforce the right wing and build
the strength of Wallace," says Ste-
wart Albert, a writer for the un-
derground press who was at a
Wallace rally in San Francisco.
"That's what we want to do.
Although our society is now re-
pressive, we feel that it needs to
be even more repressive before
there can be rebellion. Heckling is
a means of dramatically showing
a new life style and at the same
time inviting further repression.
Our style of communal living, free
speech and a free society invites
this kind of repression. We know
there will never be a revolution-
and a revolution is necessary in
order to change things - unless
there is a repressive society."
Nixon has such a finely pack-
agedrcampaign that normally
hecklers can't seem to get close
to him - although they do oc-
casionally.
But the radicals have not writ-
ten him off as a worthy target.
"We will heckle him when he's
in office," says one.

-Daily-Andy Sacks
Hatassing the candidates

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By AUSTIN SCOTT
Associated Press Staff Writer
WASHINGTON (A-) - W h e n
Negro leaders pushing for a rec-
ord Negro vote today call this
election crucial, they mean much
more than just who becomes the
next president.
A record number of Negro can-
didates - about 300 - are run-
ning for a variety of offices around
the nation, more than at any time
since the Reconstruction era put
many Negroes in office in t h e
South 100 years ago.
It's already certain that today's
voting will add three new Negro
faces to the House of Representa-
tives, for a total of nine.
The overwhelming bulk, how-
ever, are running for state offices
- mostly legislatures - and local
posts. Negro leaders hope for a
record turnout to bolster their
chances.
A large Negro turnout in Vir-
ginia and Alabama, they believe,
might add another t w o Negro
congressmen.
No one claims that victories by
a substantial number would have
much immediate impact on the

problems Negroes face in the na-
tion as a whole.
But the psychological and prac-
tical impact could be substantial
in many localities where Negroes
may get the first representatives
of their race in local government
in their or t h e i r parents' life-
times.
The election of substantial num-
bers of Negroes to local offices
could, leaders feel, be a morale
boost that would set the stage for
even more candidates - and vic-
tories - two and four years from
now, regardless of what happens
at the presidential level.
Eldridge Cleavei, minister of in-
formation for the Black Panther
party, and social activist-comedian
Dick Gregory are primarily pro-
test candidates, and Mrs. Charlene
Mitchell is the candidate of the
U.S. Communist party.
S o m e Negro newspapers have
run editorials urging their read-
ers to ignore them..
But in what shapes up to be the
biggest national gain, there will
be at least 10 and possibly 12 Ne-
groes in Congress, counting Sen.
Edward Brooke (R-Mass.), who is
not up for re-election.

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the MICHIGAN-ILLINOIS
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Saturday, Nov. 9 7:00 & 9:30
Hill Auditorium
Featuring RUSSELL CHRISTOPHER
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Some Main Floor Seats Available
Hill Auditorium Box Office
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The three new blacks will come
from Cleveland, St. Louis a n d
Brooklyn, where Negro Republi-
cans are pitted against Negro
Democrats.
In St. Louis, Democratic ward
leader William Clay, 36-year-old
civil rights activist and union of-
ficial, opposes attorney Curtis C.
Crawford, a 47-year-old Democrat
turned Republican.
Louis Stokes, brother of Cleve-
land's Negro Mayor Carl Stokes,
is running against Republican
Charles P. Lucas.
In Brooklyn, there is a close
r a c e between James Farmer,
former chairman of the Congress
of Racial Equality, and tough-
talking Shirley Chisolm, a state
legislator.
Farmer, running on both the
Republican and Liberal tickets, is
well known both for his leadership
of freedom rides and civil rights
matches in the South, and for his
work in -the slums of Brooklyn
over the past two years.
But the newly created district in
which he s running is more than
80 per cent Democratic, and Mrs.
Chisolm has built a strong local
base through her work in two
legislative terms.
As one indication of how times
change, all of the nation's pres-
ent Negro congressmen come from
cities in the North or West, while
in the reconstruction era, all came
from Southern states.
The North did not send a Negro
to Congress until Oscar DePriest
of Chicago made it in 1928.
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the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
FORMER PORTUGUESE PRIME MINISTER AN-
THONY SALAZAR worsened yesterday while convalescing
from a brain operation in September.
Salazar was operated on seven weeks ago after
a stroke and brain hemorrage. A medical bulletin issued
yesterday at the hospital where Salazar has been recuperating
noted an "accentuation in the decline of the general state of
health." He is 79.
A BLACK PANTHER hijacked a National Airlines jet
yesterday and forced the pilot to fly him to Havana.
When the plane landed, the hijacker stepped from the
aircraft and raised his clenched fist in the traditional Black
Power symbol.
Although witnesses said they saw no weapon in the man's
hand when he deplaned, Cuban officials said he was armed
with a .38 caliber pistol.
The plauie returned to Miami later yesterday leaving 65
passengers behind in Havana.
Pilot Antone Hunter said after he returned to Miami that
the hijacker renamed the aircraft in flight the Republic of
New Africa aid also robbed the passengers.
According to the co-pilot, however, Cuban officials later
returned the stolen goods to the passengers.
DISSENTING STUDENTS IN NEW ORLEANS
SCHOOLS will not be required to recite the Pledge of
Allegiance to the flag, school principles were told yesterday.
Superintendent of Orleans Parish school Carl Dolce said
no pupil will be required to recite the pledge "if- it violates
his religious, political, or philosophical beliefs."
Dolce's directive said that any pupil who wishes to be
excused from reciting the pledge must have his parent or
guardian notify his school principal. Dolce also said teachers
can be excused from reciting the pledge "only if it violates
their religious beliefs."
SOUTH VIETNAM'S AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED
NATIONS yesterday delivered an indirect slap at Demo-
cratic presidential candidate Hubert Humphrey.
Although he did not mention Humphrey by name, Am-
bassador Nguyen Huu Chi quoted a "candidate fpr higher
office" who said "the United States has every right to expect"
South Vietnam would abide by any formula for peace worked
out in its absence. Humphrey had used that phrase on a tele-
vision forum Sunday.
Chi expressed "distress and alarm" at Humphrey's stand,
and said' it is "not for any candidate' to trample on the
graves of thousands of Vietnamese who had died in the war
for reasons of "political expediency."
* 0"- *
JORDANIAN ARMY TROOPS yesterday crushed an
attempted uprising by rebellious units of Palestine com-
mandos.
Army tanks and armored cars ringed the capital of
Amman and patroled the streets after seven hours of street
fighting. Isolated clashes persisted after dusk but were ap-
parently instigated by loyalist forces rooting out the remain-
ing rebels.
Jordanian officials did not announce the number of cas-
ualties, but the U.S. Embassy in Amman said no Americans
had been harmed in the fighting.
A communique from King Hussein said fighting began
when a group of commandos attacked a police patrol, car and
held its occupants. The communique added that guerrilla com-
mando forces "exhorted women and children to come out and
demonstrate for their cause."
As a result, Amman has been placed under an indefinite
curfew to "retain stability and security" the communique
said.
TWO POLLING PLACES were destroyed yesterday
in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
Police went on special election alert last night after fire
damaged the polling areas and a terrorist bomb damaged a
Texaco refinery. In the business area of Santurces, a sporting
goods store was razed and 80 guns and hundreds of roundstof
ammunition were reported stolen.
Police issued a special announcement, however, assuring
voters there was no evidence the incidents were related. The
department is reinforcing its departments to give full protec-
tion to today's voters.

. . . 0
ISRAELI FOREIGN MINISTER ABBA EBAN met
privately yesterday with Gunnar V. Jarring, the U.N.
peace envoy in the Middle East.
Diplomatic sources said Eban gave Jarring a reply to a
memorandum submitted by Egyptian Foreign Minister Ma-
houd Riad which asked Israel to declare whether it was will-
ing to withdraw from all Arab territories occupied in the
war of June 5-10, 1967. Riad's statement also wanted Israel to
implement the U.N. Security Council resolution of Nov. 22,
1967, which outlines a settlement between Israel and the Arab
nations.
Eban reportedly gave no reply to Jarring but posed a new
set of questions concerning the peace between Israel and
Egypt.
Jarring has until the end of November to effect a peace
between the two Middle East countries unless the Security
Council renews his mission.

U

..... ..

1 .

VA5SOPH*SHW
UN ION-LEAGUE
presents "CARN IVA L"
Thurs., November 7-8:00 p.m. $2.25
Fri., November 8-7:00 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. $2.50
Sat., November 9-8:00 p.m. $2.50
TICKETS are STILL AVAILABLE!
Mendelssohn Theater Box Office 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

III

ATTENTION
GRADUATE STUDENTS I.
Interviews with a representative
of the
Cooperative College Registry
may be scheduled in the Bureau of Appointments,
3200 Student Activities Bldg. on MONDAY
THRU FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18-22, 1968

III

Get
ACTONh
with

Ill

Program Schedule of the Nifty 650

9:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M

I

}
f

Daily Classifieds

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thr

Fri

Sat

Masters and doctoral students interested in college ad-
ministrative and teaching positions for the academic
year 1968-69 are invited to make an appointment. Expe-

- ...

{E

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Enjoy Yourself

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