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November 05, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-05

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Page Twci

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesdav November 5 196R

.«i..r ~r .ar v.s..i vx.r +t . rvv

poetry and prose Professor,
Poets come for English series student clash

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'YOUNG TURKS' ACTIVE:

By ANN MUNSTER
The English department is in-
augurating a series of poetry,
readings which will be held dur-
ing the. remainder of the Fall
and- Winter semesters this year.
The department. receives a
small allottment every year to
bring guest lecturers and writ-
ers to the campus. This year,
half of that money - or about
$5000 - is being used to spon-
sor a conference on Rennais-
sance literature which will be
held in the spring.
1,e

The basic problem with this
arrangement is that the English
department, unlike others, is be-
ing called upon to foot the bill .
both for lectures of specifictin-
terest for English scholars and
for cultural activities which,
though they benefit the Univer-
sity community as a whole ,are
not provided for by any other
source of University funds.
But so far, the department
seems to be admirably combat-
ting this financial obstacle. They
have engaged three poets to give
tre
Ti P

N
"A prime mover of Czechoslo-
vakia's cultural revolution," play-
wright Ivan Klima has been in-
vited to the Uriiversity this month
to participate in the American+
premiere of his play The Castle.'
Klima, now in Prague, has not;
responded to the University's of-
ficial invitation, but Marcella Cis-
ney, who will direct the play, is
"hopeful" the author will be able'
to participate in the rehearsal
and presentation of his work.
Translated by Ruth Willard,
The Castle will play Dec. 3-8 as'
the seventh presentation of the
Professional Theatre Program's
annual New Play Project. A
Broadway cast, featuring Barbara
Baxley, will perform the play.
Whether Klima will be able to
accept the invitation and the ac-
companying PTP grant "is a'mat-
ter of government' policy," Miss
Cisney explains. "And the govern-.
anent's policies would seem to
change from day to day."?

Klima, one of the four organ-
izers of the Czech Writers' Union
which sparked the now crushed
"cultural revolution," wrote The
Castle two years ago about a
"young writer strangled by the
Stalinist establishment," Miss Cis-
ney says. She fears the playwright
may be "in the bad books with the'
Soviets for his counter-revolution-
ary work."
The PTP, which annually spon-
sors the New Flay Project to en-
courage unkown writers, decided
to produce The Castle this year in
addition to Evan Hunter's The
Conjuror because it is "pithy and
pertinent." Normally, only one
play is produced.
Author of the controversial
novel Blackboard Jungle, Hunter
has writen extensively for films
and television, and his last play,
A Race of Hairy Men, was pro-
duced on Broadway several sea-
sons ago.r

readings here during November
and have obtained $1000 of
"seed" -money from the literary
college to sponsor an expanded
program next semester.
The first reading will be giv-
en by John Logan, Wednesday
at 4:10 p.m. in 25 Angell Hall.
Logan is currently the poetry
editor of The Nation and edi-
tor of Choice: A Magazine of
Poetry and Photography.
The second reading will be
given Nov. 12 by Robert Hay-
den. Hayden is a visiting profes-
sor of English at the University
this term. He comes from Fisk
University.
His book, A Ballad of )emem-
brance, won the grand price for
poetry at the First World Festi-
val of Negro Arts held in Dakar,
Senegal in 1965.
The last reading of the semes-
ter will be given by Miller Wil-
liams, Nov. 20. Williams is a
professor of English at Loyola
University of the South. He has
published two volumes of his
poetry. A Circle of' Stone and
So Long at the Fair and has
contributed poems to a number
of literary reviews. He is cur-
rently editor of the New Orleans
review.
Prof. Russell Fraser, chairman
of the English department, says
he hopes to obtain some hon-
University subsidy to continue
and expand the program in the
future.
Fraser and Prof. Bert Horn-
back, who organized this semes-
ter's program, feel ,that poetry
readings, which are of interest
to the general public and be-
long basically to the realm of
the performing arts, might be
sponsored jointlyby the Univer-
sity and community or other
outside organizations.

over protest
(continued from page 1)
disruption claim: "I declare this
class disrupted."
That made it official.
The professor then launched
into an attempted refutation of
Denton's statements. He contested
Denton's comment that "students
are not allowed to think for them-
selves." He insisted "they are not
lectured at." He said his class "has
dealt precisely with these issues
that you have mentioned."
"You make assertions, but you
don't know what you are talking
about," he added, with emphasis.
A kid near the back of the class,
wearing a yellow shirt and his hair
neatly combed, who looked at the
intruders with some distaste when
they first entered, told me "there's
usually not a lot of discussing in
this class."'
Finally, it came to a vote. Bret-
ton asked if Denton and his co-
horts should be allowed "the 30
seconds they have asked for" (by
this time it was already 10 min-
utes). Twenty-two said yes. Twen-
ty-two said no.
The professor chose not to break
the -tie.
Denton and company walked to
the front of the room. He said the
people in the room would be the
future "ruling professional elite."
He said it was necessary to start a
dialogue.
There was another vote - Den-
ton suggested it himself, insisted
he would leave if outvoted - and
the class said goodbye to the visit-
ors.
Denton said thank you and
walked out into the hall, where
they all talked about how this was
he right way to do it.
Inside the classroom, Bretton,
flustered, said, "Where were we?'
Oh, yes. The security gap.
The strike was on.
LSA approves
representation
Of students
'The literary college faculty yes-
terday officially authorized stu-
dent representation on several
major committees. Students have
been sitting on a few major com-
mittees for a few years.
In revising its general code, the
faculty adopted sections authoriz-
ing representation on the admin-
.istyative board, which acts as a
discipline committee, and on the
curriculum and admissions com-
mittees.
The faculty also provided for
student representation on the lib-
rary committee.
In the past, students have par-
ticipated as non-voting members
on the administrative board and
the curriculum and admissions
committees. The sections adopted
by the faculty yesterday specify
that the student representatives be
"without vote," but Dean William
Hays said the phrase is practically
meaningless since the committees
'hardly ever vote anyway.

Reform may affect State Dept.
WASHINGTON (P) - A group pressed its aims through that in- vice is to make it an agency of all
of "young Turk" diplomats in the fluential organization. branches of the government with
U.S. Foreign Service, calling for Lannon Walker, chairman of the "substantial interests abroad" so
radical changes in the handling board of the association and a that it would have broader loyal-
of foreign policy, publicly proposed leader of the reformers, said the ties and experience than under
to the next president Sunday a 17- recommendations drafted by a the present system in which the
point program for shaking up the committee under Ambassador Gra- service is the instrument of the
State Department. ham Martin, former envoy to State Department.
Outstanding among the recom- Thailand, were sent a few days Walker said exceptions to this
mendations are a proposal to cre- ago to the three major presidential would be the CIA and the military
ate a new Cabinet-level post of candidates. establishment with their special
"foreign secretary" to share the "The t i m e for reform is Jan. requirements,
work load of the secretary of state. 20," Walker told newsmen, refer-
ring to the day when the new The young Turks also propos-
The program also calls for a per-< dta tenwpeietmk
manent undersecretary to run the president takes office. "It ought to ed that the new president make
Department, and for action to be done in the first one hundred it a d he reards America
days." ambassadors as his personal reps.
tighten control by ambassadors Mp resentatives to exercise, on his be-
over the activities of the Central caMan of the 17 points of aos half control over all UntedSates
Intelligence Agency -- (CIA) and consider to be improved operating government activities in the coun-
U.S. military men in foreign coun- procedures and personal practics try to which the ambassador is ac-
,s credited.,
The group also proposed that the "Wec recommend," the r"eport T
states, that the new president use The report recalled that Presi-
new president resist the temp- his reorganization authority to dent Dwight D. Eisenhower and
tation to drganize his own White plsceUSIzAtIon formayio President John F. Kennedy had
Hous forign ffic ,,place USIA U.S. Informationy ,
House foreign office." Agency within the Department of directed that ambassadors have
The "young Turks" won control State, to operate as an autonom- full direction of all government
of the 8,000-member American ous unit as is now the case with programs in the countries where
,Foreign Service Association, a pri- AID Agency for International De- they serve.
vate organization of diplomats, velopment, and that its foreign
administrators, staff assistants affairs personnel come within the
and others in foreign service work, Foreign Service of the United -Next--
a little more than a year ago. States."
Their reform movement, which is Walker said the aim of expand- BARAREL A
about two years old, has thus ex- ing the professional foreign ser-
SSHOWS lw
Latest surVey gives margin ATP
, 7:10 &9:20 .
of 3 per cent to Humphrey
(Continued from Page 1) Edmund S. Muskie, "stood up to
Nixon's campaign manager, John be counted on the issues and they
N. Mitchell, referring to the did not-like their Republican op- FOURTH
earlier Harris poll that had Nixon ponents-take the electorate for W E EK
a.2-point winner, declared: granted."

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CyclIes sellI
in Classif'ieds".

You mean I can't
see' the,
GLEE CLUB
CONCERT?

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187 law mVay stop Wallace
fTonm breaking electoral tie

NEW YORK '--A 90-year-old iHayes-Tilden deadlock in 1878-
law could prevent George Wallace }places in Congress "the final say
from choosing the next president twhether to honor an electoral
in the event of a deadlock in the 'vote cast for a candidate other
electoral college, Paul Freund, a than the candidate of his party,."
iHarvard professor and leading Any changes in electoral votes
authority on. constitutional law would have to be accepted by both
Isa1d yesterday. houses of Congress, Freund said.
However; each of the major In addition, he added, any- voting
ipresidential candiates has a dif, changes by members of the elec-
iferent idea of what would or toral college could be challenged
'hored happen if no one winis theincut
trequired Electoral College majority court.
n today's presidential election. Past defections have gone un-
It has been suggested that the challenged because their votes
former Alabama governor could were not vital for victory, Freund
'break such a deadlock by throw- said.
ing his electoral ,,votes to either In 1960, when John F. Kenne-
Vice President Hubert H.. Hum- dy beat Nixon by 303 electoral
phrey or Richard M. Nixon if votes to 219, the late Sen. Harry
neither receives the needed 270 F. Byrd of Virginia received 15
Wvotes for victory. electoral votes. Six came from
But Freund says the 1878 law unpledged Alabama Democrats, 8
-passed as the result of the from unpledged Mississippi Dem-
Uneml oymiet ( 3dps
in blak laborfoc

ocrats and one from a defecting
Oklahoma Republican elector.
All three candidates were asked
about the matter on Sunday TV-
radio interview programs, Nixon
on NBC's "Meet the Press" and
the other two on ABC's "Issues
and Answers."
Richard Nixon thinks whichever
candidate gets' the most popular
votes should be president.
Hubert Humphrey says he, too,
thinks the popular-vote winner
should be president, but that can
be made possibly only by a con-
stitutional amendment. Mean-
while, Humphrey says, the winner
should be determined by the con-
stitutional process providing for
election by the House if there is
no electoral majority.
George Wallace, however, says
the election will never get to the
House but will be decided by the
electors themselves, who in most
states are not legally bound by the
popular vote.
Freund said the law provides a
procedure for challenge of the
electoral votes before joint session
of Congress. In the present case
it would be on Jan. 6, 1969. Any
vote not regularly made in any
state can be challenged by a con-
gressman or senator.
If the challenge is upheld and
the switchover votes are not hon-
ored, "then it is possible that the
electoral vote will revert to what
it was on election night," Freund
explained.
"Because it would still be dead-
locked the House of Representa-
tives would then select the presi-
dent and the Senate would select
the vice president."
Freund said he believed election
reforms would follow this election.

"Lou Harris, the former Demo-
cratic pollster, is up to his old
tricks, again.
"Richard Nixon's lead is con-
firned by the latest and final
Gallup poll.
"Apparently, this poll did not
sit well with some of his Demo'-
cratic friends, so: he has decided
to provide a 'bonus survey' for
release tomorrow. This hurried
operation, which produced a
Humphrey lead, comprised a prob-
ability sample of only 1,206 likely
voters nationwide.
"Harris' gratuitous concoction
of this ploy will in no way con
the voters into believing that
Hubert Humphrey can win thel
election. The votingapublic has
long ago become aware of the in-
accuracy of the Harris polling
record."
Democratic National Chairman
Lawrence F.cO'Brien, speakipg for
Humphrey in Washington, said
the Vice President was "over the
top now," and added that Humph-
rey and his running mate, Sen.
Petitioning for
CINEMA GUILD
Wednesday, Thursday
November 6, 7
Sign-up
2538 S.A.B.

The Harris poll that had iden-
tical results as the Gallup figures
covered the Nov. 1-2 period. Both
surveys' were issued Sunday night.
In each poll, Nixon received 42
per cent of the vote to 40 per cent
for Humphrey. The semi-final
Harris poll gave Wallace 12 per
cent, with 6 per cent undecided.
The final Gallup had 14 per cent
for Wallace and 4 per cent unde-
cided.
- ~ -~-F

WefieG~art isa'LHnel' tenter

presents
THE MELOS ENSEMBLE of LONDON

i

Thursday, Novenber 7, 8:30
RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
(APPEARING IN THE CHAMBER ARTS SERIES)

1.
.' N
7' ~

I

Program: Adagio and Rondo.........ScHUBERT
Piano Quintet, Op. 57 .... S-IOSTAKOVICH
Contrasts for Clarinet, Violin, and Piano .. . . ...BARTOK.
Quintet in E-flat for Piano and Winds,.MOZART
TICKETS: $5.00--$4.O--$2.00
University Musical Society, Burton Tower
Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48104
Hours: Mon. through Fri. 9 to 4:00. Sat. 9"to 12 (Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Auditorium box office 1 1j= hours before performancetime)

<A

-1

_I

WASHINGTON ('-The gov-
ernment reported Oct. 23 a sub-
stantial exodus of both white and
Negro wokers out of the worst'
slum neighborhoods in the na-
tion's 100 largest cities.
This, plus improved economic
conditions and special job training
programs for the poor improvedj
employment for the 6.4 million
persons remaining in the poverty
neighborhoods, the Labor Depart-
inent said.
The report covering the past
three months said about 300,000
workers had left the poorest
slunms, presumably' moving into
better urban neighborhoods.,
This was more ,than 4 per cent
of the 1967 poverty area labor
force of 5.7 million.
About one-third of those leav-
ing the poorest one-fifth of <kceas
were Negroes and two-thirds were,
white workers. That is roughly
the same ratio as the over-all pop-
ulation in those neighborhoods,
the Bureau of Labor Statistics said
in a special report.
While employment of persons
living in the worst slums dropped
by 250,000 to 6.1 million, the de-
cline was less than the drop in the

labor force in the third quarter
of 1967. Consequently unemploy-
ment, was lowered the report said.
1"The number of unemployed
persons declined by 60,000 to
385,000," the report said., The
jobless rate dropped from 6.6 per
cent of the total labor force in
those neighborhoods the third
quarter of last year to 5.9 per cent
during the past three months.
All the drop in unemployment
was among Negroes, the report
said.
This was a much greater im-
provment than the decline in the
national unemployment rate in
the same period.
The report, the third in a
series, was designed to pinpoint
the more difficult employment
problems in the big city slums at
a time when unemployment na-
tionally been the lowest ii' more
than a decade.
The jobless rate for slam Ne-
groes dropped from 9.2 per cent
to 6.9 per cent over the year, while
the rate for white residents of the
areas rose from 4.8 to 5.2 per cent.
Nationally, the Negro jobless
rate last month was 6.7 per cent
and the white rate 3.2 per cent.

L
r;
i

-- - --

II(i

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FREE ENTERTAINMENT
Featuring the SIX OF SPADES
Come to
LITTLE CLUB

FRI. NOV. 8
,

9-12

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at the Michigan League

Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9:05

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THIS IS
THE TRUE STORY
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SELF-CONFESSED4
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2 EXCITING NEW PLAYS!v
.A powerful acid prphetic An imaginative and
play by the drngqyoungprovocative new play by
CzechS iberaladr.the author of
( 1967 Praguesuccess --Y '*Blackboard Jungle:
THE WORLD PREMIERE OF
o
N' j'«<VK.
-t
by
by
IVAN KLIMA
Adaptedby RUTH W.±ARD EVAN HUNTER
TUES., DEC. 3-SUN. DEC. 8 MON., FEB. 3-SAT., FEB. 8

MAN

I

11

r

YARAMO NT 'PICTURE
MAC 8QOARD Po,Ko1IQ
MICRE MORGAN
MICHEt. PICCOU
PIERRE CEMNL

"A delicate masterpiece of voluptuous
physical grace and refined libertinage."
GENetHr-.rNEW YOR ER?
wE r lF AM E aMMGENT I N OY

in Daily
Classifieds

with
TONY CURTIS

HENRY I ONDA

.ER

Next: "CAMELOT"

i ..r

1!

with fRANCINE BERGE
CATH RINECA :ER NE ROUVEL
DENEUV 0ILE VERSOIS
rhnr JACQUES
"B ELLE DUJFILHO
DE JOUR" } ScRr'eplay by
g ir CMANE
Drected by
M 'r' EL DEVILLE
/ Photography by
? CGoSa N CLOQUET

0

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