100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rage Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'4

Saturday, November 2, 1968

Page wo TE MICIGANDAIL

l

cinema
'Sex': Old customs never die

records
A buyer's guide with the ear in mind
By R. A. PERRY petitively joyful; one wishes for with a complex variation of conscious dissection Though vious recording of the Mozart

By HENRY GRIX
"I see you've found a way to
kill time," the Oriental house-
maid says smiling to her master.
She might as well be speaking
to the audience..Lost Sex, now
showing at the Campus, is an
extraordinarily beautiful, some-
times poignant, but exceedingly
boring film.
Belying its title and beckoning
publicity, "Sex" is not a shock-
er. .Staged in the heavy-handed
manner unique to Japanese and
Eastern European films, the film
is frigid, stilted, obtrusively
symbolic.
On the Noh stage, Sensei's
acting is appropriate; he is the
super-masculine hero of prim-
evil dramas. But offstage, he is
impotent, an unscarred victim
of the shock and radiation at
Hiroshima.
Director Kaneto Shindo con-
structs a suggestive world for
Sensei, where men and nature
conspire to remind the actor of
'his "lost sex." Icicles are phal-
lie! snow drifts form breasts.
Smoking suggests the love act
and drinking coffee is like kiss-
ing.
But there is no passion. Sense
walks alone, unhappy, empty,
even though his ludicrous, Chap-
linesque waddle makes him ap-
p3ear constantly constipated.
To relieve his pain, the gentle
maid Obasan contrives a plan
of sex-education. "People don't
abandon old customs," she tells
Sensei, and invites him to the
ancient fertility ceremony of
Yobai.
His passions are revived. In
scarf and sunglasses, Sense
mimics the rite, prowling around
his servant's home the next eve-

ning. Sighing "Hachibei,' Oba-
san, the chaste widow, accepts
her master's love. Sensei strolls
home, singing.
To prove the whole adventure
was not a fluke, the actor tries
his luck the next night. Once
again, Obasan welcomes him
with open arms.
The camera shifts the open-
ing door of a bus. And the pleas-
ant, if dulling, simplicity of the
film undoes itself.
All the obtrusive symbolism,
unsubtle shifts of scene, and
leaden pace of the, plot would
be acceptable in a deliberate
melodrama of medieval Japan.
But this morality play is dealing
'with thefear and loneliness of
a modern man.
Lost Sex might be an effec-
tive film if voided of its pres-
sure cookers, transistor radios
and souvenirs of Hiroshima.
And it might have been a good
contemporary work if done with
a bit more subtlety. But it comes
on too strong as an allegory of
the triumph of one man,
through one gentle woman, over
the destructive power of the
bomb.
Despite the disconcerting
anachronisms and the heavy-
handedness, Lost Sex has all
the virtues of simplicity. The
stark black and white photo-
graphy, particularly in the na-
ture scenes, possesses a power
that technicolor obscures. The
acting is direct, straightfor-
ward, convincing. Although the
dialogue is banal, and the pace
drags, each prolonged moment
reveals how deadened are the
senses of the impotent, actor.
But, even in the stylized Jap-

anese context, the film becomes
deadly dull.
That Lost Sex has roots in
Japanese literature and lore is
obvious, and perhaps much of
its punch escapes a naive West-
ern viewer. Constant references
to old marriage practices and
ancient phallic worship contrast
sharply with the young lovers
and body worship of this epoch.
In the character of Sensei, old
and new clash most profoundly,
and finally resolve themselves in
the knowledge that "A human
being is a wonderful thing,"
who can "conquer the atom
bomb."
"Men are not like Buddha,"
though, Obasan says. So the
film reminds the viewer of
man's inhumanity to man-and
to woman. Recurring images of
A-bombs explode in calm moun-
tain pools; and after sleeping
with the maid, Obasan advises
her master to "go off to Tokyo
and find a good wife." While
she is entombed alone in her
village, she tells him, "Never
be afraid again."
Of course, Obasan's death
clouds things. We would be sat-
isfied, and believing, if the fifty-
ish widow died from loneliness,
but she perishes from "extra-
uterine pregnancy," a peril of
too-late love in the modern
world.
Nevertheless, spring comes,'
babies are born and Sensei is
cured. Even the bomb is still
around.
Second class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 48104.
Daily except Monday during regular
academic school year.

I would rather discuss a few
records at length than any
briefly, but several new releases
have piled up that should be of
interest to the student record
buyer.
Dvorak: Piano Quintet, Op.
81. Coming from Dvorak's ma-
ture period, this melodic and
dramatic work precedes such
masterpieces as his Fourth
Symphony and "American
Quartet. Lyrics in the Czech
idiom and a sense of tragedy
clouding even the sunniest pas-
sages-perhaps the influence of
Brahms - mark this moving
work which is structurally
looser than the "American," but
which possesses equal fervor.
When the present perform-
ance appeared on the Van-
guard label a few years ago it
met warm reviews. On the bud-
get Everyman line (SRV-
288SD) it is a distinct bargain.
The players include the young
Peter Serkin, Alexander
Schneider of the Budapest
Quartet, Felix Galimir, Michael
Tree, and David Soyer, the lat-
ter two of the excellent Guar-
neri Quartet. The ensemble do
not play together with the in-
tuitive sympatico that comes
from a long relationship, but
they do play with artistry, de-
votion, and a fine sense of ex-
ploration.
Purcell: Dido and Aeneas. Al-
fred Deller may be a fine coun-
ter-tenor, but he appears on
this Everyman recording (SRV-
279SD) as a stodgy conductor,
of dubious taste. The perform-
ance is perfunctory and hur-
ried, though some of the voices
are fine, and the special effects
(the witches) come off like a
bad Shakespearean b a t t 1 e
scene: laughable. Better ver-
sions abound:
Telemann: Suite "The Pros-
titute," Assorted Concerti. This
composer, born four years be-
fore Bach, exhibited musical
fertility that bordered on the
diarrhetic. Between 1705 and
1706, for example, he wrote
over 200 French suites. All of
his music, even his Masses, are
irrepressibly and too often re-

a tremor of doubt!
Much Telemann sounds alike
and indeed it is often merely
the bubbly sound, seldom the
personal sensibility, to which
we respond. David Blum and
the Esterhazy Orchestra have'
selected pieces that for the most
part escape the "wallpaper
music" syndrome and present
them with exemplary polish
and style. Soloists like Samuel
Baron (flute) and Henry Schu-
man (oboe) help make a con-
vincing case for the individual-
ity of the music. The Vanguard
sound (BGS-70695) is excel-
lent.
Schutz: Eight Concertos
from Book II of Symphoniae
Sacrae. This is a magnificent
record from Nonesuch (H-
71196), the company which pre-
viously issued a splendid set of
Schutz's Kleine Geistliche Kon-
zerte. These eight "concertos"
are sacred vocal works that in-
volve single or paired voices

obligati instrumental parts.
Schutz developed in these works
all sorts of means of expression
that Bach could later call upon,
and he did so in the most aur-
ally fascinating and pleasing
ways, borrowing at times from
Monteverdi.
The richness and beauty of
these, pieces will surprise those
who believe that musical glori-
fication of God before Bach
lacked personal expressiveness
and color. Performance and
sound reproduction is of the
highest quality. The price is
low.
Schubert: Octet in F for
Strings and Winds. Schubert
almost achieved in his Op. 166
Octet the mystery and mag-
nificence of Mozart-unbroken
melodic and structural flow.
Completely melliflous, the oc-
tet was meant for the evening
entertainment of Schubert's
patron Count Troyer, and it
requires of the listener no great

the music student may delve.
into its structure, the work real-
ly creates an ineffable atmos-
phere of repose, an ambient
perfect for meditation, letter-
writing, reading, or making
love.
The Melos Ensemble, who
perform ,the work on new Angel
disc (8-36529), are perfectly
suited to this type of calm,
happy gemutlich, as their pre-

Clarinet Quintet attests. Except
in the final movement when the
fabric tends to show too many
holes, the ensemble find a re-
markable balance between in-
strumental integration and in-
dividuality. Gervase de Peyer
(clarinet> and, Neill Sanders
(horn) are especially note-
worthy. The piece is nearly an
hour long and Angel has re-
corded it well.

m

SAVE THE SENATE presents
Theodore White's Award-Winning 90-min. Film
"THE MAKING OF
THE PRESIDENT 1960"
starring
JOHN F. KENNEDY

V

Fri.-Sat., Nov. 1-2
Natural Science Auditoriumn
$1.00 at the door

T-9*P.M.

'fY rvJg~rfryj x.+'9s:h.M*.' :r.e .qq4',.,rrho r". ~wTYei',.i:: .i~''ry} ~ : "".}Yr' q" 5F'r? J7 ' "'.rs*rJr.r":r i '~.r1'!lk ':~'"::N1V:.'.4,
rDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETINJ
'4J
M " qCv :;' {1{. .+C".. R ,, ,+7.?,} {,q.+ v .. erJ, 7:] r y .'$,{::'t:.V'5Lv:.v . N.:}'Yx. i". - .'q .:"I . ;s":,"r:+"" V gg} '{% *}°".

A MODEST PROPOSAL
PEOPLE WHO SAY THEY LOVE POETRY
BUT DON'T BUY ANY
ARE A PACK OF CHEAP SOB's
-Keneth Patchen
GEIN ERATIONV
THE CAMPUS INTER-ARTS MAGAZINE
ON SALE SOON

I1

TO DIE IN MADRID
SHOWN NOV. 17-18
(Sun and Mon nights) 7 and 9:05
AUDITORIUM "A"
made by Frederic Rossif in '65 from
films of the Spanish Civil War. Docu-
mentory and "work of art." Sponsor,
SDS-

I

The Daily Offical Bunetin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
Jal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L. S. & A. Bldg., be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2
Day Calendar
Cinema. Guild: Hiroshi Teshigahara's
Woman of the Dunes: Architecture
Auditorium. 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
University Players (Department of
Speech): Harold Pinter's The Home
coming: Trueblood Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
Broadcasting Service: WUOM Radio
(91.7 M.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.
Saturday 1:00 p.m. Black Power -
Adam Clayton Powell, Dick Gregory and
Julian Bond in Ann Arbor discuss Black
Power' and Politics in the Controversy
'68 Lecture. 215.m. Football: U-M vs.
Northwestern, with Tom Hemingway at
the microphone in Evanston. 5:15 p.m.
Jazz Revisited - Hazen Schumacher
presents 'arallels.;
Sunday 1:30 p.m. What Must Be Done
- "nployment" (continued) with
Arjay Miller, Ford Motor Company; Don
Slaiman, AFL-CIO; and Cyril Tyson,
N. Y. City Human Resources Commis-
Fion, 2:00 p.m. Cleveland Orchestra,
George, Szell conductor. Mozart and
Strauss.
TV Center program: On Sunday, Nov.
-3 the following program produced by
the TV Center will have its initial tele-
castin Detroit: 12:00 Noon, WWJ TV,
Channel 4 - "In-Out-Round-About: The
Arts on Campus." A distinguished panel
discusses the role of the university
and college as a prime supporter of the'
arts in America.,
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Young Americans For Freedom, meet-
ing to discuss election boycott and SGC,
Nov. 3rd, 3:00 p.m., 3-q Union. -
* * * *"~
Libertarian League meeting, 2:00 p.m.,
Sunday, Nov. 3rd, Mimes (2x) Union,
Two tapes by Ayn Rand dealing with
the present state of todays politics and
political parties. Discussion.
S* * * *
UM ; Scottish Country Dance Society.
Dance meeting Weds., 8:00 to 10:30 p.m.
W.A.& lounge. Instruction given. Be-
ginners welcome. *
Bach Club Meeting, Thursday, Nov.
I, 8:00 p.m.; Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Program: a talk by John Harvith on
"Wayward Interpretations" (e.g., Kous-
sevitsky clobbering Mozart and Mengo-
berg mauling Mahler). Jelly donuts and
fun afterwards. For further information
call 79-2922 or 769-0995.
* * * *
Physical Therapy Club Wednesday,
November 6. 1968 at 7:30 p.m. University
Hospital Gymnasium - 3rd floor. Mrs.
Alice Johnson P.T., will demonstrate the
use of the gym in rehabilitation.
* * * *
U. of M. Chess Club, November 6,
7:30..p.m. 3D Union, weekly meeting.
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
This is*
Remarkable Motion Picture
Based on fact

Undergraduates possibly interested in
a summer job in Washington, D.C. -
Prepare Yourself by taking the summer
employment examination. Applications
can be picked up in the Summer Place-
ment Service, 212 SAB, from 9 to 5
Monday thru Friday. If satisfied with
last year's score, you do not have to
take the exam again this year. Dead-
line for applying for the first exam
is Wednesday, Nov. 6. - The Washing-
ton Summer Intern Program.
Actuarial Lecture: S. Benjamin, Lon-
don, England, "Computer Induced
Changes in Actuarial Science," Monday,
November 4, Room 76 Business Admin-
istration Bldg., 3 p.m. G
College of Engineering Seminar: Prof.
A. V. Blakrishnan, University of Cali-
fornia at Los Angeles, "On a New Com-
puting Technique in Optimal Con-
trol," Mon., Nov. 4, 4:00 p.m., 1504
East Eng.
Office of Religious' Affairs O p e n
Seminar: "The Divine Relativity - A
Social Conception of God," Monday,
November 4, Guild House, 802 Monroe'
St., 7:30 p.m.
Women's Research Club: Dr. De-
borah S. Freedman, Economics Dept.,
"The Role of Consumption of Modern
Durables in Economic Development,"
Monday, November 4, West Conference
Room, Rackham, 8:00 p.m.'
Placement
3200 S.A.B.
GENERAL DIVISION
ANNOUNCEMENTS: The NextAppli-
cation Date for the Federal Service En-
trance Examination, (FSEE) is Decem-
ber 11 for the test in January. There
is no test given in December.
Current Position Openings received by
Gen. Div. by mail and phone, not inter-
views, contact Plcm't. Serv., 764-7460 for
application information: These are rel-
atively immediate openings:
Wright Patterson AFB, Aeronautical
Syst. Div., Ohio: positions in Digital
Computer areas, Engineering, Material,
Mechan, Nuclear, and EE.'
Johnson and Higgins, Detroit, Mich.:
International Insurance Broker, for U.S.
clients having operations overseas, BA
and several yrs. ins. bckrnd.
Area Social Service, place of employ-
ment is Plymouth: Rehabilitation Unit
Supervisor for residential unit for re-
tarded. Unit composed of placement
officers, spec. ed. teachers, patient
trainees. Pref. man, MA in Vocational
Rehabilitation, Spec. Ed., Psych or
other, with 2 years in the field, one
should be supervisory or admin. posi-
tion.
State of Michigan: Labor Market
Analyst, BA with some coursework in
econ., stat., or math, min. 1 year in
this field or a masters degree in the
above areas. Counseling Psychologist,
PhD in couns. psych or ed, with spec. in
G&C. S611 Conservation Executive, de-
gree in related area, and 4 years exper.
Fairbanks North Star Borough School
District, Alaska: Comptroller, acctg. of
bus. ad. degree plus 4 years in govern-
mental acctg., budget work., fiscal con-
trol, admin. exper pref.
Personal Products Company, Div. of
Johnson & Johnson, Wilmington, Ill.:
ME positions, IE and IE Technician,
Indust. Rel. Mgr., and Distribution Co-
ordinator.
Mutual Life Insurance Company of
New York, Detroit, Mich.: Sales Person-
nel, several openings, :man or woman
BA or just short of it, no exper ne-
cess, will train, age range pref. 25-45.
Sella Y. Post Montgomery Hospital,
Battle Creek, Mich.: Full Time Chem-
ist, Micro-biologist, medical technolo-
gists for 193 bed acute care hospital.
State of Pennsylvania, opportunities
for Bus. Ad., Lib. Arts, and Education
Graduates in areas of public adminis-
tration, interviewing and counseling,
social welfare, rehabilitation, special ed-
ucation. Other listings for graduates in
biological and physical sci.
City of Milwaukee, Personnel Analyst,
two levels, degree and 0-2 years exper

in general personnel administration.
State of Vermont: Director of Com-
prehensive Health Planning, MPA, and
4 years exper. or BA and 6 years.'Em-
ployment Service Spec, BA and 4 years.
Chief of Park engineering, BSE, plus
years. Engineer, 'BsCE and 4 yrs. Bio-
statistician, BA in stat or math and 3
yrs. State Training Supervisor, BA and
4 yrs. Employment Service Specialist,
BA and 2 yrs. Psychiatric Social Work
Consultant, BSW and 2 yrs.
State of Connecticut: Psychology As-
sistant degree in social or life sci. Psy-
chology Associate MA Ind 2 years clin-
ical exper. Welfare Program Super-
visor, MASW, and 2-3 years.
Monessen Public Library, Monessen,
Pa.: Children's Librarian.
Ayerst Laboratories, Douses Pt., N.Y.:
Chemist, Anal. Dev. Lab, BA and 3
plus years in chromatography. Analy-
tical Chemist, and other chemist posi-
tions in areas of rrganic anal. tech.,
biol. fluids, dosage forms, and en-
gineering areas.
TEACHER PLACEMENT
Overseas vacancies-
West Africa: (Ghana, & Nigeria):
Openings in physics, chemistry, biology,
home econ., math, French, or business
educ. Requirements include bachelor's
degree, strong major in above subject,
US citizenship, and age under 50 years.
Panama Canal Zone: Elem. (K - 6)~
Phys. Educ., Sec. Phys. Ed., Bus. Ed.,
Math, Ind. Arts, Physics, Chem., Biol.,
Earth Set., English. Special Ed.: Deaf,
Ment. Ret., Learning Disorders.
For additional information, contact
Mrs. Flynn, 3200 SAB, 764-7462.
Petitioning for
CINEMA GUILD
Wednesday, Thursday
November 6, 7
Sign-up
2538 S.A.B.

i

I

I

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THATRES in',
FOR VILLAGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7691300
NOW SHOWING
MON-FRI 8:00
SUN-1 :00-3:45-6:30-9:15
SAT-3:45-6:30-9:15
Unlike other classics
West Side Story
grows younger!
MIRISCH PICTURES presents
PANAVISION
TECHNICOLOR'
Re-released thru
united Artists

I

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH

V
,

Harold Pinter's
THE,
HOMEC'OMING

1'

I#

Trueblood Theatre Box Office Hours
Oct. 30-Nov. 2 Oct. 28-29 12:30-5 P.M.
All performances-8 P.M. 1Oct. 30-Nov. 2 12:30-8 P.M.

E

$1.75-$2.25 Fri., Sat.

ARK FILM SOCIETY

TICKETS:

$1.25-$1.75 Wed., Thurs.,

a

I

I

HUMPHREY
BOGART

and
GEORGE RAFT
in
THEY DRIVE'
BY NIGHT
MONDAY, NOV. 4
7:30 & 9:30
at the ARK 1421 Hill

COMMANDER CODY
AND HIS
LOST PLANET AIRMEN
AT
boogie doors open at 8 p.m.
country and western TONIGHT! $1.00
swing bring your mother"
etc -mother
F presents:
UNION-LEAGUE
SOPH SHOW
% f'l A 1 w *UUrNrA 11

1

TONIGHT at
Pamela Miles

147)1 Lwll C

1111

11

'I1

ofU -;;(f. .- ;'r

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan