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October 30, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-30

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Wednesday, October 30, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, October 30, 1968 THE MiCHIGAN DAILY

EVEN SPLIT POSSIBLE

Repu
WASHINGTON (P) - A
publican net gain of anyw,
from 2 to 10 Senate s e a l
probable this year, deper
0 on whether you talk to ex]
at the GOP or the Democ
Senate campaign committe
Democratic strategists ii
that the present heavy maj
for their party in the Senate
be little disturbed by the N
voting. But they concede a
0 loss of two posts is quite pc
ble.
Republican experts say
not inconceivable that
could win Senate control
agree this is not likely. '
argue that a pickup of 10
is within range, however.
0 It would require a net ga
13 GOP seats for control of
Senate to shift.
This would prpduce a 5
lineup but presumably Spi:
Agnew w o u l d be elected
president in the event of st

I'.

b

ucan g
big Republican sweep and would
be in a position to break the tie
to permit his party to organize
the Senate.
At present Democrats hold 63
seats and Republicans 37. But
Democrats h a v e 23 posts at
stake in t h i s year's elections
against 11 for the Republicans.
Officials ofaboth campaign
committees have been traveling
over the country this fall, seek-
ing to bolster prospects for their
party's nominees.
The panels supply campaign
funds, research material, speech
suggestions and tips on strategy.
Sen. Edmund S. Muskie, D-
Maine, is chairman of the Dem-
ocratic Committee, but Sen. Jo-
seph D. Tydings, D-Md., h a s
been acting chairman while
Muskie campaigns for the vice
presidency. Sen. George Mur-
phy, R-Calif., heads the GOP
group.
Both sides agree there a r e

tins

probable in Senate races

-Next-
BARBARELLAC

SHOWS
AT
7:10 & 9:30
1-3-5
3rd
WEEK

many close races this fall, some
that will be in doubt until all the
votes are counted.
Democrats assert that there
has been a general upswing in
fav.or of their candidates in the
last couple of weeks.
Republicans discount this, and
say that a big sweep by their
presidential nominee, Richard
M. Nixon, will tip many tight
Senate races in their favor.
Democrats say they fully ex-
pect to take two seats now held
by Republicans - California,
where Democrat Alan Cranston
opposes Max Rafferty, who de-
feated Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel,
R-Calif., in the primary; and
Iowa, where Democratic Gov.
Harold E. Hughes is battling
David M. Stanley.
Republican experts r e p o r t
their nominees have leads in
these four states:
Arizopa, where Barry Gold-
water is trying f o r a Senate
comeback against Democrat Roy
Elson, an aide to Sen. Carl
Hayden, D-Ariz., who is retir-
ing;
Florida, where Rep. Edward
J. Gurney, R-Fla., opposes for-
mer Gov. LeRoy Collins;
Maryland, where step. Charles
Mathias Jr., R-Md., is trying to
unseat Sen. Daniel B. Brewster,
D-Md.:
Ohio, where state Atty. Gen.
William B. Saxbe is running
against former Rep. John J. Gil-
ligan, D-Ohio, who ousted Sen.
Frank J. Lausche, D-Ohio, in
the primary.
The. Republicans see numer-
ous other chances for pickups,
including these:
Alaska, where a write-in cam-
paign for Sen. Ernest Gruening,
D-Alaska, may cut into the vote
of Mike Gravel, who beat
Gruening inthe primary, and
aid Republican Elmer Rasmu-
son;
Connecticut, where Sen. Abra-
ham A. Ribicoff, D-Conn., op-
poses former Rep. Edwin H. May
Jr., R-Conn.;
Idaho, where Sen. Frank
Church, D-Ida., faces Rep.
George V. Hansen, R-Ida.;
Indiana, w h e r e Sen. Birch
Bayh, D-Ind.; battles William D.
Ruchelshaus;
Missouri, where Democratic
Lt. Gov. Thomas F. Eagleton,
who beat Sen. Edward V. Long,
D-Mo., in the primary, opposes
Rep. Thomas B. Curtis, R-Mo.;
Nevada, where Sen. Alan Bi-
Duerrenmatt's
S"The Visit"
presented by
THE ANN ARBOR
CIVIC THEATRE
OCT. 30, 31
NOV. 1,2
8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

ble, D-Nev., faces Lt. Gov. Ed-
ward Fike;
Oklahoma, where Sen. A. S.
Mike Monroney, D-Okla., bat-
tles former Gov. Henry Bell-
mon;
Oregon, where Sen. Wayne
Morse, D - Ore., is running
against Robert W. Packwood;
Pennsylvania, where Sen. Jo-
seph S. Clark, D-Pa., is chal-

lenged by Rep. Richard S. Sch-
weiker, R-Pa.;a
South Carolina, where S e n.
Ernest F. Hollings, D-S.C., faces
Marshall Parker;
South Dakota, where Sen.
George S. McGovern, D-S.D.,
opposes former Gov. Archie M.
Gubbrud;
Wisconsin, where Sen. Gay-
lord Nelson, D-Wis., faces Jer-
ris Leonard.

Democrats say their best
chances to win Republican seats,
aside from California and Iowa,
are in Kentucky, where M i s s
Katherine Peden faces Repub-
lican Marlow W. Cook; N e w
Hampshire, where Gov. John W.
King challenges Sen. Norris Cot-
ton. R-N.H., and Utah, where
Milton L. Weilenmann tries to
unseat Sen. Wallace F. Bennett,
R-Utah.

Electoral vote by states

Absentee

voters to

have

'Gie'Lleart is a9Lonel 'Hunte;

greater role in

"GRACEFUL
AND WICKED!
QUITE BEAUTIFUL
AND
ELEGANT...
SHARPLY
SATIRICAL!"
RLfA M TA0 AG X Y TfM(
"A DELICATE
MASTERPIECE...
IT OFFERS
BEAUTY.
SENSUALITY.
AND
PERFECT
TASTE!"
-.er vimf e

with
CATHERINE DENEUVE
that "BELLE DE JOUR"
girl

By WILLARD H. MOBLEY
WASHINGTON (P)--The mo-
bile American, moving around
at a rate that rises from year
to year, is headed for a bigger
role in the 1968 election than
in any previous one.
All indicators, as shown in an
Associated Press survey, point
to a considerably heavier absen-
tee vote than ever before.
But even reasonable estimates
on the over-all figures are im-
possible to assemble. Too many
of the states leave the distribu-
tion and subsequent handling
of such ballots to local election
boards. And a considerable num-
ber never do get any segregated
tally on them. In a good many
places they are just dumped in
the box and counted like any
others.
Whatever the count, the pos-
sibility that such votes may in-
fluence outcomes is perhaps
harder to calculate than the way
the home voting will go.
One factor is the question
whether the stay-at-homes will
divide evenly enough among
candidates for a possible over-
turn if the great bulk of the
mail ballots go one way. That
has been an infrequent thing
but it has happened.
There have been several re-

"""" ... fc"+OriT M TUnES .ne*.
STARTS TOMORROW MICHELPMcOoU
PIERRE CLEMENTI
. # jCATHERiNE DENEVE

cent instances in which there
were hopes among the losers,
at least for a time, that the ab-
sentees might change things.
The standout was in Califor-
nia in 1960 when backers of
Richard M. Nixon hoped to the
last for an overturn. The late
President John F. Kennedy led,
slightly in -the regular voting
but lost ground among the ab-
sentees who were not fully
counted for several days. The
switch was not enough for Nix-
on, however, and Kennedy won
with a margin of 35,623 votes or
50.1 per cent.
In the 'same election it took
eight days to get a count on the
absentees in Alaska and con-
firm Nixon's margin of about
1,000.
Connecticut had a bit of a
squeaker in 1948 when Thomas
E. Dewey won by only 14,457.
Hawaii had a tight one in 1960
and it took a recount to give
the state to Kennedy, but absen-
tees were not considered as di-
rectly affecting the outcome.
However it comes out this
year, the absentee voters are
wading through the greatest
hodgepodge of rules in the whole
U.S. election system.
The same regulations apply
, throughout any one state with a
few exceptions for such situa-
tions as heavy-voting areas or
differentiation between places
where machines are used and
those where it is all pencil work.
But if a serviceman, for ex-
ample, learns how to get his
vote cast and counted at home,
the information will not serve
his buddy from across the state
line.
If any two sets of laws on the
subject are identical, a spot
check of about a dozen failed to
disclose it.
Many of the variations are in
details such as mailing dates..
But in other cases they involve
eligibility to vote at all by mail,
the registration requirements,
how to get hold of a ballot and
where to send it. Some secreta-
ries of state deal with the mat-
ter but more commonly it is
business for local election
boards.

ecl 10 s
About the only apparent point
of full commonality is that serv-
icemen and those attached to
them can vote by one means or
another in every state. But in
two states-Alabama and Loui-
siana-even a serviceman is out
of luck unless he registered in
person before he left home.
A number of states treat a
postcard application for a bal-
lot, prepared by the government
mainly for service people, as a
valid registration form. Other
states fall between these two ex-
tremes on registration.
Mississippi has a tight rule
limiting absentee voting to ser-
vice people and transportation
workers. Most states have a
broader base and some extend
the ballot to anyone who"knows
he will be out of the state on
election day.
A few states have relaxed the
curbs a bit this year. South Car-
olina added some transportation
workers to a list of eligibles pre-
viously limited to service people
and students.
A new Florida law waives, for
those moving in from o t h e r
states, a one-year residence re-
quirement for presidential vot-
ixig.
Probably the most complete
compendium of the laws is one
prepared by the Defense Depart-
ment. It is a 53-page booklet in
layman language, treating each
state separately with no effort
at comparison. The boiled-down
state-by-state outlines run from
about 300 to well over 1,000
words each.
The indicators of rising ab-
sentee voting were reported from
well over a dozen states.
In Alaska, for instance, mail-
ings of ballots were up by over
1,000. California'srabsentees
were estimated to run around
4.5 per cent of the total vote, up
from 4.2 per cent. Hawaii'smail-
ings. were double the expected
number. Indiana figured on 50,-
000 such ballots.
New York figured on military
absentees showing a rise of
around 17,000. North Carolina
was dealing with more than
ever before. Ohio reported bal-
lot requests were heavier. The
Oklahoma estimate was for a
rise of about 15,000.

the
news today
b)7 The Associated Press and College Press Service
YOUNG CZECHOSLOVAKS yesterday defied gov-
ernment orders and stagedan anti-Russian demonstra-
tion in Bratislava.
Roaming the c i t y streets, the Czechoslovaks shouted,
"Russians go home!" and "Brezhnev boo boo boo!" Police and
militiamen pushed back the young people who had come to
the Slovak national theatre to cheer Czechoslovakian leaders
President Ludvik Svoboda and party leader Aleander Dub-
cek.
Svoboda and Dubcek visited the city to help celebrate the
second day of Czechoslovakia's 50th anniversary.
The demonstration followed a statement made in Prague
by Jan Mayer, deputy minister of the interior, that Czecho-
slovak police were determined to carry out their "duty of
maintaining public order." Mayer had issued his statement
after thousands of Czechoslovaks in Prague Monday had call-
ed for a Soviet troop withdrawal.
Earlier in Bratislava, ten thousand Slovaks had given
Svoboda and Dubcek an enthusiastic welcome. When the
eight-car train carrying the leaders arrived, the crowd broke
police lines, scattered the waiting band and honor guard, and
mobbed the railway station. The crowd greeted the leaders,
shouting, "Long live Dubcek!" Long live Svoboda!"
SEN. EDWARD M. KENNEDY (D-Mass.) yesterday
announced the creation of a memorial to his brother, the
late Robert F. Kennedy.
"The Robert F. Kennedy Memorial' is a $10 million
founda.tion designed to concentrate on problems in the areas
of. poverty, crime and education both here and abroad. No
specific projects have been announced yet.
Funds for the memorial will be raised through donations,
Kennedy said. Robert S. McNamara, former secretary of de-
fense and now president of the World Bank, will act as chair-
man of the executive committee of the foundation. Mr. and,
Mrs. Joseph P. Kennedy, Kennedy's parents, will serve as
honorary co-chairmen.
ASIAN-AFRICAN NATIONS yesterday proppsed to
the United Nations that further efforts be made to crush'
the white minority government in Rhodesia.
In a resolution co-sponsored by 40 Asian-African coun-
tries and Jugoslavia, the nations asked that economic and
diplomatic penalties be applied against South Africa and
Portugal, Rhodesia's chief allies.
Both South Africa and Portugal have refused to comply
with the sanctions imposed by the Security Council after
Rhodesia's unilateral declaration of independence, Nov. 11,
1965.
The resolution also recommends support for guerrilla
forces operating from Zambia against Rhodesia and reiterates
demands that Britain use milita'y force to crush Rhodesian
Prime Minister Ian Smith's breakaway regime.
WEST GERMANY'S SECURITY SYSTEM yesterday
was shaken again when government officials disclosed
that military equipment stolen last year has been smug-
gled to Moscow.
Atty. Gen. Ludwig Martin told a news conference that
a Sidewinder missile was sent to Moscow by ordinary freight
while two secret navigation instruments were packed in suit-
cases and flown by commercial airlines to the Russian capital..
The luggage belonged to a .mystery passenger identified only
as "Mr. X" - now under arrest.
West Germany's security system has come under attack
following charges that a series of recent espionage cases and
deaths among government officials are linked. Chancellor
Kurt Kiesinger announced he will direct a full irvestigation
of the security system when he returns to Bonn today from
Spain.
HEAVY FIGHTING IN VIETNAM yesterday continued.
The battleship New Jersey for the second time within a
week battered the demilitarized zone'while other warships and
planes delivered what the U.S. command called "one of the
heaviest blows in a month."
While the stepped-up fighting-- persisted, U.S.Vietnam

military commander Gen. Creighton Abrams ┬žecretly met
with President Johnson in Washington. A White House
spokesman said Abrams was invited to give the President a
"general military review of the situation in Vietnam." The
spokesman said, however, there was "no breakthrough" or
change in the war or in Paris negotiations.
THE INCREASE IN THE COST OF LIVING last
month tapered off slightly, rising only two-tenths of one
per cent.
The Labor department reported prices of groceries, used
cars, and home mortgage interest rates dropped in September,
while clothing, housing and medical costs increased.
The September rise of two-tenths is the smallest in a
year, compared with the average monthly increase of three-
tenths so far in 1968.
In a special report the Bureau of Labor Statistics, said
medical costs have risen about 50 per cent more than the gen-
eral rise in living costs over the past 22 years.

Frr u~t1
AI~irUstu

THURS. and FRI.
7:00, 9:00

Gt[, AOUV .>* A9E .4Af
JACQUES DUFILHO
s.. R. ,aP.NE~ o oot 1 t ,o Kxt.

.1

MICHIGAN - ILLINOIS
Glee Club Joint Concert
SATURDAY, NOV. 9-7:00 and 9:30
h!HILL AUDITORIUM

L~AIU ~

I V

ENDS-
TODAY
2:30
4:40
6:50
9:00

COUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS
IN THE TEUIICO tOI ? iY ;1
SEIRION IEFFREW tTn A RO'IA[ IttS.
PRODUCION F ERNTPRODUCTION'A

BLOCK SALES -
Begin Thursday, October 31
Hill Auditorium Box Office
MAIL ORDERS -
Send Checks and self-addressed envelope to:
MICHIGAN MEN'S GLEE CLUB
6044 Administration Bldg., Ann Arbor
Please specify 7:00 or 9:30 performance
2.50 $2.00 $1.50
INDIVIDUAL SALES BEGIN NOVEMBER 4

_ ;r

U

U ND ERG ROU N D at the Vth Forum

N
D
E
R
G
R
0

STA
TOD

Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.-11:00 P.M.
-separate admission required

5th Ave. at Liberty, 761-9700

MAD MARVIN PRESENTS IN ANN ARBOR:
CORRUPTION OF THE DAMNED-George Kuchar-One of the great film-makers presents a
FEATURE LENGTH unforgettable Underground Comedy. "A wild orgy-filled odyssey. Seethes
with violence and sex." -Village Voice
Plus these great short films:
VIVIAN-Bruce Conner-A study of a beautiful woman.
SAN FRANCISCO TRIPS FESTIVAL-Ben Van Meter-A psychedelic documentary of the San
Francisco Trips Festival and the Opening of the Psychedelic Shop.
WORD MOVIE-Paul Sharits-Highly experimental. Fifty words visually repeated in varying se-
quential and positional relationships.

MI
VES
Win
10 A
AwJ

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION Mon. - Fri: 8:0
RTS Fox EASTERN THEATRES Sat. 3:45-6:30-
SAY FOR VILLa6E Sun:
375 NO.MAPLE RD.-769-1300 6:30 - 9:15
RISCH PICTURES prese ts
ner of
Sjjlf TECNCOLORa
arils!-3ys ?S R-easdtr
Friday-Nov. 1-One showing i 1:00 P.M.
Tickets on sale at box office 7:00 P.M.
A devastatingly, dynamic picture

I

TONIGHT and Every Wednesday at
A Hoot
An evening of endless musical variety
Special tonight-Song Category Contest
Come and do your thing or sing-a-long

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

THURSDAY

IS THERE RACISM IN THE
ANN ARBOR SCHOOL SYSTEM?
Speaking-PAUL JOHNSON
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
PAMELA MILES-
returning by overwhelming popular demand to sing blues, ballads,

I liftIPijUill I

U

4I I

I

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