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October 26, 1968 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-26

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Soturdoy, October 26, 1968

Page Twelve THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, October 26, 1968

Battle Creek nips Ann Arbor in prep classic

k

By THOMAS R. COPI
If Battle Creek Central is rank-
ed number one in the state, then
the Ann Arbor Pioneers should be
ranked number one and one-half.'
The Bearcats of Battle Creek
barely clawed their way to a 9:7
win last night, to spoil the Pio-
neers' 6-0 record and their home-
coming as well.
Ann, Arbor's outstanding de-
fensive squad, which made a suc-
cessful goal line stand late in the
fourth quarter, was unable to do
a repeat performance moments
later, and with 1:18 left on the
clock, Battle Creek halfback John.
Simms burst into the end zone for
the winning touchdown.
The Bearcats went into last
night's tilt ranked as the number
one prep team in Michigan. But
the first half of last night's game
was all Pioneers, as the boys from
Battle Creek had the ball only
four times and were only able to
muster three first downs.
The Pioneers, on the other hand,
moved the ball well. One drive
which looked like a sure touch-
down for the Pioneers was thwart-
'M' polo team
dunks Detroit

ed by Battle Creek's Jim Roebuck.
who nabbed a Jerry Schneider pass
out of Ted Kennedy's hands on
the 10.
But the renowned Bearcats were
unable to penetrate any further,
than the Pioneer 42 and punted
to the Pioneer 12.a
Two plays later, with about
seven minutes left in the half,
quarterback Jerry Schneider arch-

ed a long pass to flanker Wayne,
Marshall, who gathered the ball
in on the Battle Creek 42 an'd
high-tailed it into the end zone:
with three Bearcats in hot pursuit.
Bill Pritula split the. uprights to
make the score at halftime 7-0 for
the Pioneers.

The Pioneers, who were
ed to bs one of Battle
toughest opponents this

expect-
Creek's
season,

held the Bearcats to 58 y a r d s of the Pioneer line made the kind
rushing and a single yard pass- of goal line stand you thought on-
ing in the first half. ly happened in the movies, and
But after intermission the game got the ball in downs.
was a different story. Folowing the After three punches at the line,
opening kickoff, Ann Arbor's of- the Pioneers boomed the ball from
fense stalled and the Pioneers were their own end-zone to the 41.
forced to punt from their own 36., A 27-yard pass from co-captain
A short punt dribbled to the Bear- Ron Gifford to co-captain Guy
cat 46, where they started their Portis put the Bearcats right back
first successful drive to' pay dirt. into scoring position on the Ann
Featuring some fine running by Arbor 14. After two inconm lete
Feaurig sme ineruningbypasses, a counter play moved
Simms, the Bearcats fought their Simms to the three for a first
way down to the Pioneer 9 before down, and set up his game-win-
stalling. A 28-yard field-goal was ning touchdown run.
called back because of an official The win assures .attle Creek of
penalty, and Roebuck, BattleaTleastnasties tte6-League
Creek's excellent place-kicker, was at least a tie for the 6-A League
forced to duplicate his scoring title, and strengthens their claim
feat to put the Bearcats on the to the mythical state champion-
scoreboard. ship.

ITNDER UIADS

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File Now!

Ann Arbor took the kickoff but
was unable to move the ball and
when a fake punt failed miserably
for no gain, the Bearcats took over
on Ann Arbor's 48. The Battle
Creekers,after three unsuccessful
tries at the line ran, a fake punt
down to the Ann Arbor 26. But
their momentum was broken by
a fumble on the very next play.
But once again the Pioneers
couldn't move and punted to the
Battle Creek 36.
With Simms leading the way
from his halfback spot, the Bear-
cats pushed the ball to the Pioneer
one-foot-line, where Steve Burk-
hart and the rest of the middle

l SNBA .
Detroit 132, Philadelphi 122
i ABA

Elections Nov. 12, 13
Petitioning closes 5:00 pm. Oct. 28

THE WORKHO
Bill Twining (32
bor's 9-7 loss to

-Daily-Matt Lampe
RSE OF TH PIONEER BACKFIELD) sophomore
), stiff aris his way to a short gain in Ann Ar-
the Battle Creek Central Bearcats. Twining car-
times for 89 yards.

By ROD ROBERT

Michigan splashed by Detroit ried the ball 22 ti
Athletic Club 11-9 last night in
a water polo match at Matt Mann
Pool. It was the fourth victory
without a loss for the team com-
prised of varsity and freshman
swimmers. /
Detroit took an early 2-0 lead,
but two quick goals by Mike
O'Connor tied the score at the
end of the first quarter. Michigan
then completely dominated the ac-
tion for the next. two periods as
it sprinted to an 11-5 advantage.
Gary Kinkead scored three goals
from in close to put Michigan
ahead to stay, as Greg Zann's
pesky defensive tactics kept the
Motor City Club's offense in check.,
Four last* period goals by Detroit
came too late.
What Michigan lacked in mas-
tery of scoring plays and defensive:
skills was more than made up by
bull strength. To overcome their
inexperience, they swam fast-
and hard.?Although in only their
first year of competition, the polo
players have shown the desire to,
win.
Earlier this semester some of:
the varsity swimmers persuaded:
Swimming Coach Gus Stager to
take time from swim practice and
devote it to water polo.
Stager not only found time for
additional polo practices but has
found an assistant to help coach-
ing.
The next match is with Ohio
State on November 23 in Colum-
bus after the football game.

Tau Epsilon, Phi,
SALUTES
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