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October 26, 1968 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, October 26, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

Paae Eleven

olverines

want

a

jug

for

Homecoming

By JOE MARKER
If Minnesota can follow through
on the second of its one-two
Homecoming punch, the Big Ten
title may go to the Gophers on a
technical knockout.
Minnesota crowned Michiganj
State last week for Homecoming
and will face Michigan in the sec-
ond round today.
Since 1922 the winner of the,
Minnesota-Michigan "Little Brown
Jug" classic has won or shared
the title 20' times. History, how-
ever, has favored therWolverines
who have gone'* to glory 12 times.
Several exceptional ' Wolverine
teams, though, have fallen to even
better Gopher elevens. This is per-
haps best illustrated by looking at
the glorious Tom Harmon era in
Michigan football.
In 1938, Minnesota pinned the
only defeat on Michigan, a 7-6
heartbreaker in Minneapolis, fol-
lowed a year later with a 20-7 ver-
diet.
Harmon's senior year saw the
Maize and B 1 u e compile a 7-1

The Lineups

Offense

Defense

(88)
(76)'
(56)
(52)
(61)
(72)
(86)
(22)
(23)
(40)
(48)

MICHIGAN
Jim Mandich' (215)
Bob Penska (225)
Dick Caldarazzo (210)
Dave Denzin (220),
Stan Broadnax (226)
Dan Dierdorf (245)'
Jerry Imsland (210)
Dennis Brown (175)
Jim Betts (180)
Ron Johnson (196)
Garvie Craw (218)

TE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
SE
QB,
F
TB
FB

(80)
(75)
(66)
159)
(67)
(74)
(85)
(15)
(38)
(11)
(34)

MINNESOTA
Chip Litten (210)
Jim Wrobel (243)
Tom Fink (235)
Steve Lundeen (226)
Dick Enderle
Ezell Jones (245)
Ray Parson (235)
Phil Hagen (176)
Barry Mayer (209)
Walt Bowser (165)
Jim Carter (220)

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LB
FLB
FB

(91)
(65)
(90)
(39)
(97)
(74)
(55)
(24)
(25)
(26)
(12)

MICHIGAN
Phil Seymour (193)
Tom Goss (225)
Tom Stincie (217)
Henry Hill (200)
Ed Moore (200)
Dan Parks (235)
Cecil Pryor (218)
Brian Healy (170)
Tom Curtis (180)
Jerry Hartman (170)
George Hoey (169)

LE
LT
LLB
MG
RLB
RT
RE
LCB
LS
RS
RCB

(84)
(76)
(70)
(65)
(86)
(60)
(54)
(30)
(18)
(27)
(23)

MINNESOTA
Bob Stein (223)
Ron Kamzelski (240)
Steve Thompson (221)
Jim Pahula (223)
Del Jessen (210)
J. Darkenwald (221)
Wayne King (212)
Noel Jenke (212)
Dennis Hale (193)
Jeff Wright (181)
Doug Roalstad (175)

LE
LT
MG
RT
RE
LB
LB
LB
LH
RH
S

slate, not quite good enough as
Minnesota fashioned a perfect 8-0
record, including another 7-6 vic-
tory over its Ann Arbor foe.
Enough historical background.
Today's battle shapes up as a pos-
sible championship tilt, as both
teams straddle the conference
crest with 2-0 records.
A victory for Michigan would
give them an excellent shot at the
,Rose Bowl berth, since they have
relatively easy games with North-

western, Illinois, a n d Wisconsin
before engaging Ohio State. Min-
nesota faces a rockier road, since
it'has yet to face Purdue and In-
.diana in back-to-back November
encounters.
Both teams have followed es-
sentially the same path in compil-
ing their perfect conference rec-
ords. Minnesota trailed 7-0 at the
half last Saturday but took ad-
vantage of Michigan State fum-
bles to fashion a one-point decis-

CORRECTION

The article in Friday's Daily
stating that the Libels defeated
the uac muggers 18-6 was slight-
ly erroneous, The Daily learned
la*~ last night. The real score
of the game was 12 to 6, accord-
ing to reliable sources, but no-
body, oddly enough, was certain
who was the winner. In a n y
event, the Libels reportedly
played honorably, fairly and
decently, contrasted w i t h the
typical disgusting, fascist uac
showing.
** *
On the left is a valiant young
man of The Daily Seven and a
meanheaded gollum from uac
engaged in immortal combat
over the "preciousss" pigskin.
Needless to say that even with-
out, the help of wizards good-
ness triumphed and peace
reigned over the land.

ion, even though the Spartans led
in every offensive statistic.
Michigan parlayed fumble re-
coveries and pass interceptions in-
to a 27-22 squeaker over Indiana.
Two weeks ago each team broke
open a tight game in the second
half for its initial conference vic-
tory.
Minnesota, like Michigan, fea-
tures a defense which gives up
huge chunks of yardage outside
its 20-yard line but which becomes
very stingy at that point. Its abil-
ity was demonstrated near the end
of the State game when the Go-
phers held the Spartans on downs
in the dying moments to preserve
the victory.
As usual, C o a c h Murray
Warmath's defensive line is com-
prised of a wall of behemoths who
turn any runner's stomach inside
out. However slow they are, it will
be very difficult for Michigan to
launch an inside ground attack.
However, it won't be any easier
to run around the outside, as Bob
Stein, a legitimate All-American
candidate, and Del Jensen at the
ends can turn almost any running
play inside.
Their importance becomes great-{
er 'against Michigan, since the
Wolverine attack relies heavily on
outside runs by Dennis Brown.
The Gophers will again throw
an unimaginative (a la Woody
Hayes) but sometimes effective
offense against the Michigan de-
fenders.
Warmath relies heavily on his
plodding but powerful backs Jim
Garter, Barry Mayer, and George
Kemp, running behind mammoth
tackle Ezell Jones (6'4", 245), to
keep control of the ball. They had
better do a good job, because the
quarterback situation is still very
shaky.
Phil Hagen has claimed the
starting berth, but his passing
leaves much to be desired. Despite
magnificent protection from his
forward wall, he could complete
only half his passes against State
dnd had two intercepted.
In addition, his receivers, al-
though solid football players, are
hardly the type to' bust up the
game with a big play.
Minnesota has been aided by;
return of their first-line players
after early season injuries. Bob
Stein, Ron Kamzelski, and Steve
Uundeen, all key linemen, should
be at full strength. f s.
Michigan, for the first time this
season, played a game without
sustaining any serious injuries.'
The Wolverines have also press-
ed into service some excellent
back-up men, who have helped
preserve the last two victories.
Coach Elliott mentioned that,
"It has been gratifying to see
some .of our sophomores come in
and give us the support we need.
Tim Killian stepped in when
we lost Stincic (through ejection
from the game) and did a fine

daily
sport's
NIGHT EDITOR:
' DIANA ROMANCHUK
(More Sports on Page 12)
job at linebacker. Henry Hill, Dan
Parks, and Ed Moore are other
first-year men who have con-'
tributed to our defensive effort."
Thus injuries should provide
either team with an excuse for
subpar performance.
Strategywise, we can lookfor
Michigan again to try and estab-
lish its running game (Johnson
and Johnson, and more Johnson)
early in the game simply because
Minnesota :has given up a great
amount of yardage in the middle
of the field.
However, the Wolverines will
probably have to score via the
lightning route because of the ef-
fectiveness of the Minnesota 'de-
fense near its own goal line.
Minnesota, on the other hand,
will make a supreme effort to
control the ball .as long as possible
for two reasons.

-Daily-Eric Pergeaux
MICHIGAN ALL-AMERICA CANDIDATE RON JOHNSON bulls his way through the tough Michigan
State line on his way to another big gain. Johnson proved unstoppable against the tough Spartan
defenders, but faces an even greater challenge today in the form of the big Minnesota line. Johnson
has proved himself to be particularly effective between the twenty-yard lines this year, though', and
this will cause him to be used more than ever today, as the Gophers have shown themselves vulner-
able in this particular area.%

First,, they don't wish to give
the volatile Michigan offense,
which is averaging 25 points per
game, many chances to sco'e. Sec-
ondly, their passing attack is so
unsteady that they don't dare put
the ball into the air.
The Homecoming attraction will
be interesting enough to draw
some 75,000' away from their TV
sets (and the Notre Dame-Mich-
igan State game) while separating
the pretender from the contender.,

LEN'S Arborland Buffet

W llsFeature A
On Saturday, Oct. 26
11:30a.m. to 8 p.m.

,,

.--
f <?

FRIED CHICKEN * BARBECUED SPARERIBS
SWEDISH MEATBALLS
ITALIAN SPAGHETTI * FRIED OCEAN PERCH

Ruggers, Lacrossers battle
Notre Dame on two f ronts

-Daily-Sara Krulwich

GOOD, BAD ANDUGLY: O
BIig 10 today: Gridiron flick

By JIM WILE
Throughout the conference to-
day the Big Ten features exhibi-
tions of football spectaculars (or
is that football spectacles?).
The games can be categorized in
groups of the good, the bad, and
the ugly.
At East Lansing, in one of the
good ones,. Michigan State plays
host to Notre Dame in a non-
conference ,game Notre Dame ar-
ar- rives rated fifth in the nation af-
ter jamming a 58-8 score down the
throats of Illinois. The aerial
antics of quarterback Terry Han-
ratty and split end Jim Seymour
are out to bomb the Spartan de-
fense.
Going with'a new quarterback,
sophomore Bill Triplett, and a

little psychology Coach Duffy
Daugherty is trying to steady the
shaky State offense. Hungry for.
victory after blowing a close game
to Minnesota 14-13 last week, the
Spartans are looking for a little
Irish stew.
In what could be an uncom-
fortably close game for Purdue
puts the Boilermakers against'
Iowa. A superior Purdue offensive
attack might be the key. to the
final outcome;
Sputtering after being' upset
earlier in the season by Ohio State,
the Boilermakers have come on
weaker with an offense based on
the fabulous feet of Leroy Keyes.
Last week Purdue managed to eke
out a victory over Wake Forest,
28-27, only by scoring two touch-
downs in the last seven minutes of
the game.
Iowa i comes into the contest
after an easy romp over Wisconsin,
41-0, in last week's action. Despite
their lowly 2-3 record the Hawk-
eyes sport one of the steadiest
point-producing offenses in the
nation.
Indiana goes ,into action against
Arizona in. another non-confer-
enc g me. Football fans at Bloom-
ington swill be able to see a fierce
clash between an exciting Hoosier
offense and a powerful Wildcat
,defensive team.
The Hoosier offense, averaging
nearly 30 points per game, feat-
ures a 'passing attack of quarter-
back Harry Gonso to anyone.
Hopefully those anyones are
flanker Jade Butcher, Eric Stol-
berg, or Al Gage.
Arizona comes to the game with
a 4-0 srecord and one of the stin-

giest defenses in North America,
giving away an average of only
five and three-quarters points per
game.. The main power of the
Wildcat defense lies in tackle Tom
Nelson, end Bill McKinley, and
linebacker Gary Klahr.
As for the bad, Wisconsin has
decided to take on a fighting
Northwestern team in Evanston.
Spectators will see two losing
teams with identical y0-5 records
perform. For the first time in six
week Northwestern, a first three
quarters team, will be able to play
an opponent unable to produce
anything in any quarter.
In Champaign, Illinois plays
host to number-two ranked Ohio
State in what could be an ugly
game. The fighting Illini, it has
been rumored, are armed with a
formidable supply of band-aids in
resprvP,.

Amidst thespree of events that
mark Homecoming, the lacrosse
and rugby teams pursue their re-
spective sports against the Irish
of Notre Dame.}i
The lacrosse clash comes' first',
at 9:30 this morning in the old
stadium at Ferry Field.
A game that dates back to the3
Indians, and was significant in
the capture ofI Fort Michilimack-
inac, it pits two teams armed with
long-handled web-buckets against
a tiny orange ball.
This particular contest, how-
ever, is special because it is "Joel
Cordish Day." Cordish, who play-
ed goalie for Michigan was shot
and wounded on the Diag early 'on
the morning of Oct. 5.-
Donations will be accepted at
the game today to be used as a

fund for rewards leading to the
apprehension and conviction of
the person responsible.
Several hours later,' after the
owner the the "Little Brown Jug"
has been depided, the ruggers take
on the 'A' and 'B' teams' from
Notre Dame.
Though both schools belong to
the Midwest Rugby Union, there
are no last. year's defeats to re-
vengeas they battledfor their own
kind of jug.
Many football fans have dis-
covered this non-stop, virtually
spontaneous brand of "football"
stopping by Wines Field after leav-
ing the football stadium.
For the real rugby enthusiasts
;here will also be a game at 1:30
tomorrow afternoon, same place,
against Windsor.

Whipped Potatoes and Gravy Choice of Vegetable
Rolls and Butter Assorted Salads
ALL YOU CAN EAT-ONLY
Children under 10, 99c 1
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ARBORLAND Shopping Center-=Washtenaw at US-23
-- I - - ------ --- -Y

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rim

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wmr.r.

rge H Foigner Junior Sato
Jniversit r of Utah State University
thern California

Win or. Lose!

Robert P. Flum
Purdue University

Geo
Sout

+3
Ut
Ki

LEROY KEYES

PARAGON'
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Go to Blaises' Hearty Post-
Game Bullet. Beverage is
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SA.do Ifl if we n.

THE CLASS OF '68
JOINED r
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