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October 25, 1968 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-25

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Friday, October 25, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pnnp Ffavan

Fridy, ctoer 2, 168 HE MCHIAN AIL

rage ieve

I'1

.Ca Robie captures
Schollander loses 200-meter freestyle;
.Debbie Meyers clinches third gold medal

Olympic

200 -meter butterfl
Japanese gymnasts defeat Russian team
with near perfect individual performance

By The Associated Press
MEXICO CITY-Carl Roble, the
captain of Michigan's swimming
team in 1967, scored a major up-
set last night and won the Olym-
pic gold medal in the men's 200-
meter butterfly.
Currently a sophomore at Dick-
inson Law School, Robie swept to
an early lead and then turned
back' a challenge by Great Bri-
tai's Martyn Woodroffe for the
win. John Ferris of Sacramento,
Calif., was third while Mark Spitz,
the sensational California high
school, senior, faded early and was
never in contention.
In other swimming events,
plucky Debbie Meyer sped to a
'runaway victory in the women's
800-meter freestyle, becoming the
first triple gold medal winner at
the Olympic Games, but Yale flash
Don Schollander was an upset
victim as the powerhouse U.S.
swim team won two of four finals.
Robie was the silver medalist in
the 200-butterfly at Tokyo in 1964,
as he was beaten by Australian
Kevin Berry. Berry, who went to
Indiana University, never succeed-

ed in defeating Robie again.
At Michigan, Robie's perform-
ances were impressive enough to
place him in the category as the
Wolverines greatest swimmer of
all time. Coming back from the
Olympics for his sophomore year,
the Pennsylvanian won the Na-
tional Collegiate 400-yard indi-
vidual medley in 1965, and was
second in the 1650-yard freestyle
and 200-yard butterfly.
In 1966, Robie won the 200-yard
butterfly in the NCAA's while
placing fourth in the 1650-free-
'style and seventh in the 500-free-
style. And in 1967, after winning
Big Ten championships in three
events, he again won the 200-yard
butterfly in the NCAA's, while
placing third in the 500-freestyle
and fourth in the 1650-freestyle.
MEETS SPITZ
Late in his college career, Roble
was considered easily the best in
the world at the 200-butterfly un-
til he ran into Spitz in the 1967
National AAU meet. Spitz, then
merely, a sophomore in high
school, clobbered the Michigan
star.

daily
sports,
NIGHT EDITOR:
JIM FORRESTER
In the Olympic qualifications
this past summer, Robie, who had
lost much valuable training time
while attending law school, was
barely able to scramble to third
place, the lowest position on the
Olympic squad.
At X23, Robie went to the Olym-
pics as the oldest member of the
men's swimming team.
FIGHTS ILLNESS;
Miss Meyer, the 14-year-old
freestyle marvel from Sacramento,
Calif., who shook off strength-sap-,
ping stomach, ailments earlier in
the week, added the 800-meter

MEXICO CITY (M9--Defending
champion Japan uncorked a
blazing finish, led by remarkable
Sawee Kato, to easily defeat a
formidable Soviet Union squad
and capture the team gold medal
in Olympic men's gymnastics last
night.

Kato won the individual
around gold medal. Mikhail
ronin of Russia was second
Japan's Akinori Nakayama
third.

all-
Vo-
and
was

CARL ROBIE, Michigan alumnus, displays perfect form in his
specialty, the butterfly. fA silver medalist in 1964, the former
Wolverine swim captain won the gold last night in Mexico City.

crown to her 200 and 400 gold
hauls with a 20-yard triumph over
teammate Pam Kruse.
In winning the 800, a new event
on the Olympic program, as was
the 200, the blonde became the
first women swimmer in the his-
tory of the Games to capture three
individual golds.
Miss Meyer completed her triple

Oh Mama! Libels 18, Muggers 6

By ERNIE HORSE
The Daily Libels rolled to an
easy 18-6 victory over the ill-fated
UAC Muggers late this afternoon,
rallying behind Field Captain
Loathsome Landsman's unbeliev-
able blocking.
A capacity crowd of 36 packed
Wines Field to watch the debacle
V but only a few i'emained to see
the inevitable finish. The only
ripple of excitement occurred
when UAC Captain Dan McCreep
scored late in the first quarter to
tie the score 6-6 while the Libels
practiced a song and dance act on
the sidelines.
McCreep astounded the fans by
carrying the ball an incredible 12
yards without dropping it or fall-
ing down.
"It was then I decided we should

keep some guys on the field all
the time," commented Coach Clar-
ence "Biggie" Copi.
Copi told The Daily he was forc-
ed to stop using the unstoppable
straight I formhation early in the
second quarter when the fourth
string Libel offense found it im-
possible to stop scoring after run-
ning the tally up to the final 18-
6.
"I even fumbled on purpose,"
noted Ace Quarterback Jellybean
Neubacher, "but they just wouldn't
recover it."
The Libel scores all came on
fumbles recovered in the UAC
end zone.
Contacted after the game, Mc-
Creep told The Daily, "We deserv-
ed to lose. We stink. I don't know
what ever prevailed on us to

challenge you guys in the, first'
place. Maybe we're stupid."I
The Amazin' Libels gave an ex-.
hibition of their grid prowess to
the fans late in the first half
when it became apparent that
neither side would score again.
Copi sent the" entire first string
out for the first time in the game
with instructions to go as far as
possible without running up the
score.
Their self-restraint was unbe-
lievable.
The team took the ball on their
own 5 yard line and ran a scat-
back option tackle eligible power;
sweep left up the middle off the
straight I. Jellybean took t h e
handoff from Mad Mountain
Tnerko and fired a bomb into
the waiting arms of "White"

Levis, killing him instantly. He
then ran around left end and lat-
eraled back to Frenchie LaBour,
who re-centered the pigskin back
to Loathsome. By this time the
Mugger defense had lost all track
of the ball, and Loathsome walk-
ed down to the Mugger one yard
line, where he sat down.
The Libels then astounded the
fans by repeating the same play
as a double reverse going in the
wrong direction, winding up back
on their own five where they be-
gan as the half ended.
In the second half the Libels
enjoyed a quiet game of bridge
in their own end zone, sending the
dummy out to stop any of Mc-
Creep's runs as they materialized.,
Split End Gromper Gray en-
joyed a fine rubber in the first.
round, bidding and making tw w
small slams to take the prize by
1800 points. By the last quarter,
however, he had joined most of his
teammates at the Brown Jug for
Coke and Fritoes.
crf arf
LIBELS MUGS

with a clocking of 9 minutes, 24.0
seconds-a record for the first-
time Olympic race. She spurted to
an early lead and drew further
away from the field on each lap
of the 50-meter pool.
Ada Kek, 6-foot daughter of an
Amsterdam milkman, broke the
American string in the women's
200 :butterfly and. young Mike
Wenden of Australia beat off Don
Schollander's late challenge to win
the men's 200 freestyle in an
Olympic record time of 1:55.2.
WENDEN WINS
Wenden got off to a fast start
and had a lead of one meter after
100 yards, but Schollander-swim-
ming hero of the 1964 Games-
pulled almost even going into the
final 30 meters.
Then Wenden uncorked a fin-
ishing burst that gave the 18-
year-old Aussie his second gold
medal. He won the gold in the 100
meter freestyle earlier in the week.
Schollander was timed in 1:55.8,
and John Nelson of Pompane
Beach, Fla., took third and the
bronze medal at 1:58.1.
The two conquests spelled the
U.S. medal splash to a record 18
gold, 12 silver and 17 bronze in
26 swimming and diving finals.
The 18 golds are two more than,
the previous high grabbed off by
the Americans at Tokyo four years
ago.

The Japanese, who also bested
Russia at Tokyo in the 1964
Games, thrilled a capacity crowd
at the Mexican National Audi-
torium with a series of sensational
performances in the closing op-
tional round of six events.
East Germany won the team
bronze medal.
Kato provided the sensation of
Swede loses,
on results of
alcohol tests
MEXICO CITY VP), - Sweden
was stripped of its bronze medal
in the Olympic Games team pen-
tathlon event yesterday night be-
cause one member was alleged to
have exceeded his alcohol intake
before the shooting event.
Sven Thofelt, Swedish president
of modern penththlon Interna-
tional Federation, said:
"Sweden's bronze medal has
been taken away from the t e a m
because one member failed the al-
cohol test - the only alcohol test
as far as I know in the Olympics."
Alcohol tests do not apply in
most events in the Olympics but
were introduced to the shooting
portion of the modern pentathlon
at the urging of the Swedes in
1965.
Competitors in the modern pen-
tathlon are allowed only the equi-
valent of a whisky or a couple of
beers before the shooting takes
place.t
The modern pentathlon gold
medal was won last Friday. So
were the silver and bronze.
Several people have left for
home since that date and that's
the reason it has taken so long
for the whole complicated busi-
ness to be worked out.
'Therfelt said the Swedish pen-
tathlon athlete involved was Hans
Gunnar Liljenvall, a 27-year-old
teacher.

the evening by scoring 9.90 points,
nearly perfect, in the closing floor
exercise event, which won him the
gold medal.
Japan's superbly. balanced team
outscored the Russians in all ex-
cept one of the six events to pile
up 576.00 points for both Thurs-
day night's optional and Tuesday's
compulsory rounds.
The Soviet Union had 571.10
points. The Russians trailed at the
halfway mark only 286.40 to 285.15,
but the Japanese raised their sec-
ond round marks to almost a five
point margin
Veronin is the husband of Zi-
naida Vernin of the Soviet Union
who won. the woman's all-around
silver medal Wednesday night.
In the next-to-last event for
Russia, the floor exercise, Voro-
nin's score of 9.70 was loudly
boed by the crowd, which thought
his performance was not that good.
On the other hand, when Kato
scored his 9.90 tally-10 points is
perfect-the crowd chanted wild-
ly; "Kato, Kato, Kato" even be-
fore the score was flashed on the
board.
BOXING SEMIS.
Featherweight Albert Robinson
of Oakland reached the finals of
the Olympic boxing tournament
yesterday but three other Amer-
icans were beaten in semifinal
bouts.'
Jimmy Wallington of Ft. Bragg,
N.C, dropped a close semifinal

W L
Boston 3 0
xBaltimore 3 1
Cincinnati 3 1
Philadelphia 2 1
xNew York 2 2
Detroit 1 3
Milwaukee o3
western Division
xSan Diego 2 1
San Francisco 2 1
Atlanta 2 1
Chicago1 2 2
xphoenix 1 2
Los Angeles 1 :3
Seattle 1 4
x-Late games not Included.

is

II

NBA Standings
Eastern Division

Yesterday's Results
New York at Phoenix, Inc.
Baltimore at San Diego, inc.
Only games scheduled.
Today's Games
Atlanta at Seattle
Philadelphia at Detroit
Baltimore at Los Angeles
Only games scheduled.

I

decision in the light welterweight
class, John Baldwin of Detroit
was beaten in a light middle-
weight bout and Harlan Marbly of
Washington lost hi's light fly-
jweight fight
Over-all, American athletes have
taken 88 medals, including 37 gold.
Runner-up Russia, with 16 first
prizes-one Thursday-among its
total of 52, has no hope of over-
taking the U.S. despite an expect-
ed coup in gymnastics during the
last three days of the Games.

Pet.
1.000
.750
.750
.667
.500
.333
.000
.667
.667
.667
.500
.333
.250
.200

GS
2
x
1Y
1x
x

Only games scheduled.

Seeg
PULVERIZE TRIANGLE
inL annual
T-BOWL' FOOTBALL GAME

I

NHL Standings

1

East Division
W L T Pts. GF GA

GOODNESS POINTS
TEAM SPIRIT,
CHEERLEADERS
CANES.
FALSE EYELASHES
HALITOSIS
TOTAL EFFECT
HEARING AIDS
FALLEN ARCHES
SURVIVORS
AESTHETIC BEAUTY
HOPELESS STARES
CHEATING
BALL GRABBING
TOTAL BILL

73
413
2
0
2
11'4
927
1
17
429
1100
0
0
23
$7.23

0
--2%
96
33
745
62
14-4
12
392
4
747
231
2

i

Chicago
Montreal
Boston
New York
Toronto
Detroit
Oakland
Minnesota
St. Louis
Los Angeles
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh

4
4
3
2
1

1
2
2
1
3

0
x
0
0
a

10
9
8
5
2
s
5
3
3
2

33
17
16
20
11
12
15
19
12
9
9
9

19
8
10
14
10
12
26
21
16
27
9
19

SAT., OCT. 26,

at
WINES FIELD

10:00 A.M.

West Division
2 4 1
2 3 1
1 2 1
0 3 2

Yesterday's Results
St. Louis 2, Boston 1
Minnesota 3, Philadelphia 3
Only games scheduled.
Today's Games
Montreal at Oakland
Only game scheduled.

WEEJUNS IS THE REGISTERED TRADEMARK FOR MOCCASIN CASUALS MADE ONLY BY . N. BASS & CO., WILTON. MAINE 04294

Win or Lose!

THE UAC OFFENSIVE machine attempts to score in a run around left end. Unfortunately, half-
back Bob "Boring" Neff (center) ran the ball towards the sideline instead of toward the goal.
"Three diamonds," commented Libel Scatback Eric "Yanquigohome" Pergeaux from the end zone.

0

Folk, rock,
jazz groups...
were lendingyou ourears!
ENTER THE 1969 INTERCOLLEGIATE MUSIC FESTIVAL

If your group sings, picks,
strums, claps-or makes any
kind of good sound,,
sign up now for the
national competi-
tion... co-sponsored
by the brewers of
Budweiser, King of
Beersa.

REGIONALS: Mobile, Ala-
bama; Villanova, Pennsylvania;
Norwalk, Califor-
nia; Elmhurst, Illi-
nois; Little Rock,
Arkansas; Salt Lake
City, Utah.
FINALS: St. Louis,
Missouri, May 22-24

m
l r=
4
{
I
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i Alp%
i
i
4
1 s
Go to Slaises' Heart Post
Game .Buffet. Sewerage is
5...._x__ .1 -2 A-.! ...- ..___.._L S.!_....

ITn TrTlT. T A 1fT. _-inY Tr1 191 1 ".

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