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October 25, 1968 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, (

Michigan shows statistical surge,
manages to play good football too

Curtis

breathes,

the winning spirits

By FRED LaBOUR
Michigan is currently riding the
crest of the seasonal wave we are
known .to call the Big Ten.,
The football prowess of the,
Wolverine' is being heralded
across the length and breath of
America's heartlands as the Maize
and Blue hurtle past various foes,
be they Spartan or Hoosier.
Now, some of us would like to
think that it all sort of happens
by chance or divine intervention
or voodoo, but that just ain't so.
There are some hard-fact stone-
cold numbers to back up those
Wolverine victories out there on
the turf and with only a paltry
perusal of the relevant statistics,
we, can shortly uncover the real
and ALL TRUE FANTASTIC rea-
sons for Michigan's success..
Take points sbored for instance.
Michigan is fourth in the Western
Conference in points scored with
a 27.5 per game average while the
team's Scrooge-like defense has
allowed a miniscule 18.0 points 'per
tilt.
Michigan is also fourth in net
yards gained per game with a'
414.5 average. Iowa takes first
place honors in this category with
a surprising total of 519.5. ,
As we finish up rounding out
the team statistics, before looking
at how the Blue behemoths are
faring individually, we discover

that the defense backfield has
evidently been doing a creditable
job, and they indeed lead the
league ,in interceptions with an
average of 2.5 per game.
Not only that, but the offensive
team hasn't been exactly out to
lunch while handling the tricky
pigskin they've not ever lost the
ball once to top the league.
On the individual level,, captain
Ron Johnson is running second
only to John Isenbarger of luck-
less Indiana in total yards gained
with 327. Isenbarger has picked
up 358 but he's had 10 more rushes
in which to do it.
Johnson is currently in third
place in yards-per-carry with a
5.9 average behind Tim Sullivan of
Iowa and Bob Pernell of Indiana.
Harry Gonso heads up the
league in pases thrown with an
amazing 68 lofted so far this year,
and the Wolverines' Denny Brown
comes in fourth with (forthwith)
45. Brown is hitting for a com-
pletion average of .511, good for
third in the conference.
Brown is tied with Gonso in the
touchdown pass department with
four apiece.
The agile Brown is also doing
pretty hot in the total offense'
department coming in third with
462 yards behind Gonso and Larry
Lawrence of the ubiquitous Hawk-
eyes. Johnson, it might ,be noted,

is fifth in this piece of the sta-
tistical pie.
Perhaps the most interesting
statistic is the individual scoring
race. Michigan has failed to place
one player in the top nine in the
individual scoring indicating that
either the Wolverines are playing
totally as a team or the official
scorers are looney.
On the receiving end, Jim Man-
dich leads in yards per reception
with a torrid 21.7 average.
Defensive hot-shot Tom Curtis
is picking up right where he left.
The Homecoming Pep Rally
has been moved from its tra-
ditional site at the baseball field
to the track stadium. The Rally
will be held at its previously an-
nounced time of 8 P.M.
off last year by leading the pack
in interceptions with three.
Also, the longest punt return of
the year belongs to fleet George
Hoey for his 63-yard effort against
the Middies from Navy. (Navy is
situated near the sea.)
The farthest anybody has run
back a recovered fumble this year
is eight yards and the fellow that
did it was -Michigan's own Bob
Wedge against Indiana. Way to
go, Bob.
Johnson holds the season rec-
ord so far for number of rushes
per game with an astounding 34
carries at Bloomington last Sat-
urday.
That's enough about Michigan.
Now let's get to a real football
team Wisconsin.,
Wisconsin, the Pearls of the
midwest, have failed to place a
single player in any of the cate-
gories of passing, running, kicking,
catching, or anything. They are
alowing an average of 40 points
per game in league play and scor-
ing an average of zero points per
game.
I'm beginning to think that we
don't have to root for the Pro-
hibitionists anymore now that
Wisconsin has emerged as such an
inspiring team.

By ROBIN WRIGHT
The football team is comprised
of all kinds.
There are the studs, and the
nice-guys.
There are the stereotype ath-
letic animals and the old married
deadheads.
And then there are the Diamond
Jim Bradys.
Michigan defensive halfbackI
Tom Curtis typifies the last cate-
gory.
A favorite pasttime, Curtis re-
lishes a good wager, especiallyI
in a card game. As a roommate
and fellow card ,player lamented,
"he never loses a bet."
Curtis explained his passion "as
another form of competition. I en-'
joy playing against somebody with
a reward at stake. I'm up for a bet
anytime."
Proof if his statement goes back
to another affection-pizza.
Combining his gambling talent,
football confidence and a basic
craving for pizza, he acepted a
challenge from his roommate. The
bet, which the roommate later
termed as "not such a smart idea,"r
provided that every time Curtis
caught an interception the room-
mate had to buy him a pizza, and
everytime the opposition caught
the ball behind Curtis' back Curtis
had to do the same for the room-
mate. Again proving his adeptness
at speculation, Curtis is 3-0 pizzas;
ahead.
STOCKBROKER AS FUTURE
An economic major, Curtis has
no deep interest in the subject,
"although being a stockbroker
might not byea bad career, con-
sidering my native gambling in-
stincts.
A second consideration in Curtis'
future is professional football.
Commenting that I'd like to play
pro ball, and if I'm good enough
to be drafted, and confident of
playing quality ball, I'll sign."
Curtis added that he had no de-
finite plans in any direction.
Skilled in-all athletic endeavors,
Curtis follows what seems to be
a trend inMichigan football play-
ers as both high school football
and basketball captain.
Dropping basketball when he-
got to. college due to freshman
fatigue, Curtis now plans to go
out for the baseball team in the

TOM CURTIS

spring. A summer pasttime, his
lifetime average is well over .300-
while playing every position avail-
able. Confident of his skill, Curtis
is even considering pro baseball
in his future plans,
TIC. FINE
Nicknamed "T.C." by friends,
his rooommate finds no faults in
him. As he explained, "a lot of
guys tease him about being big-
headed, but it's just confidence in
himself." If they askhim if he's
good, he'll tell them that sure he
is, but he's just being honest, not
bragging.
"For example," he specified,
"when he was picked as an All-
American candidate this year, he
didn't tell anyone. He never talks
about his accomplishments, unless
he's asked. And then he just tells
them how he feels.
Cutis justified his attitude, "if
you don't have confidence in your-
self, you can't have it in anyone."
He went on to explain how the
same attitude contributed to what
is often mistakenly labeled by
Michigan fans as the new team ef-
fort. "Each game the guys have
gained more confidence in them-
selves, and it has, in turn, built
up the team's confidence and
spirit."
"We're a changed team since the

California game," he noted. "Then
we were just hitting with out'arms,
but now we're using our bodies,
and it obviously makes a differ-
ence."
BOWL HOPES
As for the season predictions
and rising hopes among Michigan
students for a rerun of the 1964
season, which ended in Pasadena,
Curtis commented, "I think we
have a chance to go to the Rose
Bowl. We'd have a lot going for
us if we went into the Ohio State
game undefeated.: About 25 guys
on the team are from Ohio, in-
cluding myself, and most will pro-
bably have several friends and re-
latives at the game. We'd really
like to put on a good show for
them.
"But, despite any long range
hopes, the team is only playing
game-by-game, and we've got a
tough one ahead against Minne-
sota this week.
GETTING "UP",
"T.C.'s" pre-game strategy in-
volves relaxation and quiet. "I
like to think about the game and
my role in winning. It really dis-
turbs me when I hear noise, be-
cause somehow that makes me
think that the guys aren't trying
to get ready, but they are just
goofing off.
"When it comes down to the
morning ofthe game, I get real
nervous. Like before' the Indiana
game, I was the worst I've been all
season, I was shaking all over, but
I played my best game. Now I
know that if I'm not nervous,
something's wrong, and I try to
force myself to be tense.
Sounding like captain material,
Curtis related how he likes to help
keep the guys going. "If a guy'
makes a good play, I like to tell
him what a good job he did. It'
really helps your confidence If
someone on the team lets y o u
know you're doing you're job."
But Curtis is also a perfectionist
in evaluating the team. "I can get
really upset when someone makes
a mistake. I know that I shouldn't
let it effect me, and I -always re-
gret it later, as I know I make
mistakes too."

(ridde Pilckigs

A Special for Opera Lovers
Three long-playing stereo records featuring thirty-
seven of the world's famous opera stars, for only
$6.79.
662-0675 Ak417 East Liber
just past AA Ban
WUi IOPS

TOM CURTIS leads the blocking for George Hoey on a punt
return in last year's tilt against the Gophers in Minneapolis.

ty
ank

Center for Chinese Studies presents
Dennis Twitchett
speaking on
The Tunhuang Manuscripts
and the
Study of Chinese Social History
OCTOBER 28 4:00 P.M.
Room 200 LANE HALL
Mr. Twitchett is a Professoo Qf Oriental History
at Cambridge University'
lCIHALK(STIPES3
- our 4p-to-date traditionals
r..
}w Z I
- Y
f :
Stripes are back in a big way. And in great
variety. White chalk on dark grounds.. ..
colored chalk on mixture grounds. All in
the best of taste and the best of tailoring by
H.Freeman & Sonof Philadelphia.
.fI

i

M mermaids drown CMU
Prepare for NCAA finals,

In trying to upset the infamous Daily Libels football squad, uac
(pronounced uck) has resorted to the most fiendish tactic possible-
it planted a spy within the Daily.
For four years this despicable vermin scouted the Libels, learned
their- secret tactics, and even messed up plays during the annual
slaughter of uac. His efforts,, though of no avail, irritated the Libels
to the point of establishing an investigative committee to discover the
slimy sleuth.
After many months of researching the basement of the Student
Activities Building, a break in the case was found. Though the agent
was fiendishly clever, he had one vice-entering Gridde Pickings.
This mania was discovered when an unusual number of entries were
found under the name of "Snortin' Lark." What was unusual was
that the entrant invariably sported a 0-20 record.
To corral the traitor, The Committee devised a trap. It added a
rule to Gridde Pickings saying anyone picking uac in the Daily-uac
grid contest would be -disqualified.
The agent was in a bind. To enter the contest and pick the Daily
would cause him disfavor with his uac superiors; to pick uac would
cause his discovery. He considered not entering Gridde Pickings, but
his vice was too ingrained.
He entered but immediately skipped town. The Libels were
shocked to learn that this scum was none other ;than last year's sports
editor, Clark Norton. Though still in shock, a spokesman was able
to babble, "i should have known. He never did pay me back that
$50 he owed me."
In order that the public see the truth, Norton's entry is reprinted
below. As punishment, he has been officially disqualified from Gridde
Pickings. But for the rest of the honest public, entries will still be
accepted until 4 P.M. this afternoon. Remember, though, the Daily
must be chosen in order to qualify.
BILL LEVIS, Associat Sports Editor, (67-33, .670) - MICHIGAN, Ohio
state, Northwestern, Purdue, Notre Dame, Indiana, California, Princeton, -Vir-
ginia,'Mississippi, Miami(Fa) Air Force, Texas Tech, Stanford, Wake Forest,
North Carolina State, Harvard, Alabama, Holy Cross, DAILY LIBELS.
DAVID WEIR, Sports Editor, (66-34, .660) - MICHIGAN, Ohio State, North-
western, Purdue, Notre Dame, Indiana, California, Princeton, Virginia, Missis-
sippi, Miami (Pla.), Air Force, SMU, Stanford, Wake Forest, North Carolina State,
Harvard, Alabama, Holy Cross, DAILY LIBELS.
DOUG HELLER, Associate Sports Editor, (64-36, .640) - MICHIGAN, Ohio
State, Northwestern, Purdue, Notre Dame, Indiana, Syracuse, Princeton, Vir-
ginia, Mississippi, Miami (Fla.), Air Force, Texas Tech, Stanford, Wake Forest,
North Carolina State, Harvard, Alabama Holy Cross, DAILY LIBELS.
BOB LEES, Associate Sports Editor, (62-38, .620) - MICHIGAN, Ohio State.
Northwestern, Purdue, 1Notre Dame, Indiana, Syracuse, Princeton, Navy, Houston,
Miami (Fla.), Pittsburgh, Texas Tech, UCLA, Wake Forest, North Carolina State,
Harvard, Alabama, Buffalo, DAILY LIBELS.
CLARK NORTON (Sports Editor Emeritus), uac spy - MICHIGAN, Ohio
State, Northwestern, Purdue, Notre Dame, Arizona, California, Pennsylvania,
Virginia, Mississippi, Auburn, Air Force, SMU, Stanford, Wake Forest, North
Carolina State, Harvard, Alabama, Holy Cross, uac muggers,

' .

UTTLE ,VICTORIES

by Back Lab.

Y

DON'T FORGET
YOUR APPOINTMENT
WITH THE DENTIST TURFY.

DEAR, DR. BAMFORTH'S
OFFICE CALLED.
THEY CANCELLED
YOUR APPOINTMENT,..

I

The Women's Speed Swimming
and Diving Club continued in its
winning ways Wednesday downing
Central Michigan 60-28. Previous
victories this season include an
83-37 smashing of Michigan State
two weekends ago.
Michigan took first in all events
execept the 100-yard Individual
Medley and the 50-yard Butterfly
which Lynn Alsop, a 1964 Olym-
plan and Central team captain,
won.
A 200-yard Medley Relay com-
posed of Jan {Dorah, Johanna
Cooke, Barb Patterson, and Kathy
Stidwell copped Michigan's first
points with a winning time of
2:04.
Miss Stidwell took the 200-yard
fresstyle before Michigan captain
Lyn Alison posted a :27.2 to cap-
ture the 50-yard freestyle with
teammate Jan Pfleeglor second.
Central picked up some points
in the diving event, taking second
and third places, but Michigan's
Gretchen Hughes held on for first.
The 100-yard freestyle was an
extremely close race, Mary Bennet
PAUL CAMELET
MASTER TAILOR
for Men and Women
alterations and remodeler
specializes in shortening ladies
coats, slacks, and skirts.
No longer with Camelet Bros.
in business for himself.
1103 S. University
above the du tr

just edging' out Central's ,Sue
Reeder for the victory. Margie
Scriva followed with another
Michigan first in the ' 100-yard'
ba'ckstroke, clocking a 1:31.1.
The next meet is the All-Michi-
gan meet held November 16 at
Wayne University. But the team
is looking forward to November 23,
and the NCAAs at East Lansing.
After six years as champions they
slipped to third last year, and
aim to regain the top position.
BIllboa rd
There willt be an organization-
al meeting for all those inte-
rested in becoming IM basket-
ball official on Wednesday, Oc-
tober 30th at 7:00 p.m. In the
IM Building. No experience is
necessary; pay is $2.50 a game.
* * * .
IM Co-recreation " activities
will be cancelled tonight due to
the Homecoming Dance. Activ-
ities will resume on Friday,
November 1.

dl

DR. BAM ORM
HAS A TOO'MACHE:
t
{

ANY AOMENT WORTH.
REWARDING
IS VvME7H REWARDING WELL.
L B
I~

(CONSENSUS in capitals)
1. Minnesota at MICHIGAN
(pick score)
2. OHIO STATE at Illinois
3. Wisconsin at NORTH-
WESTERN
'4. Iowa at PURDUE'
5. NOTRE DAME at Michigan .
State
6. Arizona at INDIANA
7. Syracuse at CALIFORNIA
8. PRINCETON at Pennsylvania
9. VIRGINIA at Navy

10. Houston at MISSISSIPPI
11. MIAMI (Fla.) at Auburn
12. AIR FORCE at Pittsburgh
13. SMU at TEXAS TECH
14. STANFORD at UCLA
15. North Carolina at WAKE
FOREST
f 16. Maryland at NORTH
CAROLINA STATE
17. Dartmouth at HARVARD
18. Clemson at ALABAMA
19. HOLY CROSS at Buffalo
20. DAILY LIBELS vs uac
muggers

4.

r

F

JEWS and CHRISTIANS

9r

I

_t

'I ,r r l r~

0'1466 cookHi*s Mgw W* NAPOiW. ma 0

in ROMAN EGYPT

.

I

Lecture by PROFESSEUR KILPATRICK
Chair of New Testament Studies-Queen's College, Oxford

4:15 P.M.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29th

MUltipurpose Room, Undergrad Library
Sponsored by: Dept. of Classical Studies, Dept. of Near Eastern Languages
and Literature, Office of Religious Affairs.

LOCK the DOORS
BAR the WINDOWS

CALL the NATIONAL GUARD

4'

The awesome Mugger unit from the University Activities Center will go through
the formality of retaining the little brown wastebasket on Wines Field today at
6:00 p.m. While the team had planned on extending the pleasure of their com-

/.

MARK RUDD Speaks

I

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111

11 11

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