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October 25, 1968 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-25

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Page Two

THE MICHICAN'DAILY

Friday, October 25, 1,968

P .d< i a 6 TalTE MCHIAN"DILYFriayOctoer 5, ,96

E. . .

Inadmissible

By HENRY GRIX
Anthony Page's film Inad-
missible Evidence, now showing
at the Campus mourns the de-
cline - and -fall - of the angry
young man. Mournfully, after.
looking back in anger, play-
wright John Osborne reveals he
has no future to look forward
to. Perhaps the stage version
of Osborne's most recent effort
was more satisfying, but the film
degenerates into self-conscious
driveling, which cannot be sal-
vaged by the sensitive perform-
ance of Nicol Williamson, as
another, aging anti-hero..
For 15 minutes, it is excrusia-
tingly painful to watch the
throes of Osborne's haut bur-
geoise hero. Then it becomes
dully painful. Then it becomes
dull.
Williamson recreates his ori-
ginal, but altered, stage role, and
appropriately behaves like a
man who knows his part too
well. "Thirty-nine years-old, tol-

erably bright, irredeer
mediocre," Williamson per
torily accepts, but noisily
moans his condemnation
eternally comfortable, succ
life. He brutally and bitter
sults everyone, but with
cabulary snatched from
Manchester Guardian. He 1
with tired pride of his prod
proficiency ("Do you like
you want it") at sex. He
up the phone on his wife
minating their conversatio
mindlessly completing it to
self.
r For himself, he feels imm
ly sorry. When Williamson
gazing steadfastly at wh
hopes is his cancer-r
thumb, he is sighing "I've
made a decision I've not r
ted. I've always depende
other peoples efforts. I
know the difference betw
friend and an enemy."
For'the first 15 minut
the film,, Williamson's del

cinema
laws in 'In
mably soul-searching is impressive. The and th
func- movie begins with Ken Hodge's cepting
y be- effectively photographed and while
to an nearly soundless dream se- impote:
essful quence in which the hero, the And,
ly in- head of a law firm, is dragged become
a vo- through prison under the scrut- viewer
the my of his "loved ones." not a
boasts As the dream' continues, not ev
igious courtroom sounds of ruffling neuros
it, do papers, coughing, and g 1 a s s less an
hangs beakers deafen Williamson and he lov
n, but he wakens after hearing him- tionall
him-n charged with circulating resolve
hm pornographic photos and while tesizes
swearing on his "faith in the than-is
aense- inevitability of automation," distastE
is not that he is . . despise
at he The film is no less intriguing strives
idden as Williamson proceeds to h is membe
never law firm and is curtly dismissed his cur
egret by his "obedients," who mumble This
ed on an impersonal greeting to him of twe
don't as Mr. Macon, Mr. Mathan, or unfolds
een a maybe Mr. Madchen. No one and no
ever, addresses him by his first film mi
tes of name. dedicat
lirious But he has names for them, mainin

I 11;

iadmissible Evidence'

ey deserve insult for ac-
their own impotence,
understanding what an
nt bastard he is.
as the abused anti-hero
s incorrigibly abusive, the
realizes he is certainly
tragic figure and really
en a pitiable one. His
es are too common, base-
d boring. He hurts whom
es, and courts whom he
He Is oversexed, but emo-
y frigid, unable to face or
any conflict. He roman-
his past into a larger-
ife orgy, which .is more'
eful than his present. He
s the present, but vainly
to regain his times re-
red by "identifying" with
vaceous hippy daughter.
acidly pessimistic view
ntieth-century cowardice
s, quite subtly, beautifully,
ot without humor, in 15
inutes. But Osborne seems
ted to squander the re-
g 70.

There is a succession of
dreams, including a return to
court for conviction. (The court
dreams paralleling Williamson's
mute mien at professional inter-
views with a tearful matron
whose marriage is dissolving be-
cause of her dissolute husband,
and with a latent homosexual
willing to plead guilty and hu-
miliate his family because he
"doesn't want to change.")
There is a dreamy s t r o l1
through Hyde Park in mod coat
and tie. (Paralleling William'-

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe

son's otherwise useless afternoon
trip to Carnaby Street to the
beat of Dudley Moore's Bedaz-
zled-like score and his errant
lust for his daughter with the
bell bottoms.)
What seems embarrassingly
clear to the sympathetic viewer
is that the most effective way to
scathe the idle rich is through
farce. The embittered Osborne
should have chosen a sturdier
whipping boy or else taken a
thoughtful lesson from Moliere
-or even Mike Nichols.

Sat., October 26

Indian Dinner

Celebrating Diwall (Indian New Year)

.6 PM.

Cost $1

(First Forty Reservations Only)
CALL 662-5189

HALLOWEEN PARTY

8 P.M.

All Welcome-Especially Foreign Students

A strange Sunday at Canterbury

Back to the roots
In an attempt to foster appreciation of a film genre that is
currently much neglected, even in the cinematically-aware com-
muity of Ann Arbor, a new film society has been formed in order to
boost awareness of American "grassroots" directors.
The group, named "The Ork Film Society," operates out of the
Ark Coffee House on Hill St., with showings every Monday night
at 75 cents admission. Among the directors whose works will be
featured are D. W. Griffith, the exiled Jean Renoir, John Ford, and
Englishman-cum-American Alfred Hitchcock.
Most of the films chosen for view in the first schedule (running
currently through Dec. 9) are from the two decades immediately
following the advent of sound in cinema; most of the films are also
lesser-known products of those directors who have achieved fame
either in commercial houses or at such "art" societies as Cinema
Guild.
For instance, the Griffith work on the schedule is from his
much-neglected late period; instead of Intolerance or Birth of a
Nation, the film is Abraham Lincoln (1931); the schedule dis-
tributed by the society calls it "his final masterpiece." The Renoir
on the program (scheduled ,for Nov. 11) is not La Grande Illusion,
but the rarely-seen This Land is Mine.
Other featured films are John Ford's Young Mr. Lincoln,
Raoul Walsh's They Drive by Night, Hitchcock's Suspicion (ap-
pearing this Monday night) and Notorious Max Ophuls' Letter
From an Unknown Woman, and, Moonrise, by Frank Borzage.
Members of the society indicate the group's continuation next
semester will depend on its reception this semester.

at the Del
ED TAYLOR
singing traditional folk songs
PROGRAM STARTS AT 6:30
Deli-6:00
ALL WELCOME

By JEREMY JOAN HEWES
Communication is to, from
and among people: to succeed, it
must also be of people. That is,
any form of communication-
sound, print, touch, whatever-
must be stated in terms that
people will understand and ul-
timately accept. These criteria
likewise apply to communication,
of any message or set of values.'
A fine example of such com-
munication may be seen any
Sunday morning at Canterbury"
House. A folk mass to, from
and among people is celebrated
there each week. Last Sunday,
Oct., 20, the folly mass was en-
riched by members of the San
Francisco Mime Troupe and
the first slhowing of a film by
Craig Hammond, one of the two
Episcopal ministers who direct
the center.
The service was i nzixed media
exercise - a folk trio of Bob
Franke on guitar, Gene Barkin,
electric guitar, and Andy Stein,
bass, accompanied the singing
of formal parts of the mass and
folk counterparts of hymns or
anthems. In one scene, the
Mime Troupe moved to the'
rhythm of one drum and a brief
narration from Time about pro-
secution of the Catonsville nine;
in another, a "cranky" of rolled
paper illustrated the, tale of a
soldier told by an actor and
punctuated by two recorders.
The.,color film combined an ex-
cellent spatial college for an
episode with the people them-
selves and their best communi-
cators, children. A musical tracle,
accompanied the film, intro-
duced by the Beatles singing
"Fool on a Hill."
Yet the litany of the mass was
not abandoned. Martin Bell and.
Bob Franke have written music
for the Kyrie, Creed, Agnus Dei
and other elements of the mass:
the people, performers and cele-
brants sang together. Message,
too ( was in the singing - as in
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING

Wi

FRIDAY
MIKE
GABBARD

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.,

no"

singing conte'mporary, traditional and Samoan folk
music accompanied by guitar.
SATURDAY
DAVE JOHNS and MARGERY HIMMEL
singing a variety of blues and folk music accom-
panied by guitar and harmonica.

#I

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3:00 P.M. SUNDAY, OCT. 27
1833 Washtenaw, Ann Arbor

-Daily-Andy Sacks

A new mode in religious services?

a verse of Franke's "Pilgrim-
age":
For doubt drove us down as
we walked upon the road
And a rain of indifference
held us back
And the maps of your mystery
weren't-noticed by the blind
When fear turned the day-
light black.'
Hammond reaa tne epistle to
the trio's quiet playing and
humming of "Hey Jude," and
people were asked to participate,
in the prayer of intercession.
One man said, "Prayer is so on
a downer, I pray it would be
NATIONAL OeNERAL. CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES S
FOX VILLa6E
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300
HELD OVER '
MON.-FRI.-7:15-9:15
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SUN.-1:15-3:15-5:15-
7:15-9:15
PETER SEER 3
IN-I Live Yu.
AuCE B.hIBULPS
NEXT-"WEST SIDE STORY"

otherwise." And communion was
celebrated with round loaves of
bread in baskets, and wine in
earthenware goblets p a s s e d
among the people.
The focus was constantly shift-
ing and the scene changing dur-
ing the service, but nothing
seemed to be forced upon the
people - things were being
done their way and the points
were made. Dan Burke, the min-
ister who officiated at the folk
mass, was silent for a moment

after the gospel was read, then
he said, "You can hardly avoid
it, but touch each other." Then
louder, "Come on, touch ea c h
other." A hundred and fifty
people sat on the floor and the
stage, leaned against walls and
railings, hand in hand. Com-
munication became fellowship
- the message was the people,
and, if only for a few moments
or a few hours, the message was
lived.

FRANCOIS MITTERRAND
* N
FRANCE IN MOTION

Thursday and Friday
ARSENAL
Directed by Alexander Douzhenko, 1929
"Arsenal" is one of a collection of late 1920's Russian films
which established the U. S. S. R. as an international film power.
It is the story of the Ukraine and the Ukrainian people during
the Russian Revolution. Dovzhenko stands with Pudoykin andI
Eisenstein as the "Big Three" of early Soviet cinema.
"Extraordinary visual impact, revolutionary both in theme and in
style."
7:00 & 9:05 5ARCH I TECTURE
662-$$715c A DITARI UM

.

CINEMA II
Homecoming Special
STEVE McQUEEN
in
CINCINNATI KID
Dir. Norman Jewison
"In the Heat of the Night")
FRI DAY-SATU RDAY-Oct. 25-26
AUD. A id req

;
, :/
K' ,\

OCTOBER 27 2:00 P.M!
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets on Sale-$1.00
Diag (11-2) and Union
Desk (All Day)
Tickets available at Door
Invitations to reception
available at Union
and League

UNION-LEAGUE

w

-Next-
BOSTON
STRANGLER

NO 2-6264

WRLT
DISEY
P-srnts
~ARLEV MILL

I

Techn 'color'

I

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I

U

U N D E R G R OU.ND
Thurs., IFri., Sat., Sun.-11:O P.M.
N-separate admission required

at the Vth Forum
5th Ave. at Liberty, 761]-9700

SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL
WINNER OF
ACADEMY AWARDS!
"Beautiful agting and inspired interpreta-
tions all the way, this visual closeness to
the drama offers insights that are bril-
liant and rare." -New York Times
A J. ARTHUR RANK ENTERPRISE
a z a r eepresents
6y William Shdkespearr
Ai TWO CITIES FILM
U"&r tlt mm lrmeit of. FILIPPO DEL GIUDICS
A CONTINENTAL DISTRIBUTING. INC. RERELEASE

2nd
WEEK

.

G3E; ertisc1n1 'Hfunme'

(

D

not recommended for anyone over 30 years of age

4

E

F1

EXPANDED CINEMA is a revolution. A new way of seeing. A new way of thinking. A new
way of being. The image is the idea is the word is the act. Expanded awareness. A taste of
the essences. Expanded Cinema says it. It says: Revolution.

i

R
G
R
0

1

PAULSEN-FOR-PRESIDENT
Gigantic Political Rally

MAIN STREET-a moment of sexual desire stretched in time so as to make fun of itself-psy-
chedelic background."
REPORT-by Bruce Conner-an' underground film-maker's examination of President Kennedy's
assassination.

IN PERSON

Friday and Saturday
2:30, 5:15, 8:00

PAT PAULSEN

BRATS-Laurel and Hardy play themselves and their sons. Very funny.

Also Featuring
The 1st EDITION

u

PIECE MENDALA-END WAR-one love making act which is seen simultaneously from both sides
of its space and both ends of its time.

MAURICE EVANS-JUDITH ANDERSON
"MACBETH"

Ticket Contributions

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