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October 22, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-22

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Page, Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 22, 1968

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, October 22, 1968

Music

Arts".-Chorale:

By JIM PETERS
No one from the Michigan
Arts Chorale has ever met com-
poser Carl Orff, but surely each
menber of the group must know
him very well after their per-
formance last night' in Hill Aud.
under Maynard Klein. Their
hard work, determination and
enthusiasm turned out good
music and left little to complain
about.
The program looked short on/
the printed page, only three
pieces, spanning three centuries
of choral: music. Yet each was
sufficient in its own way to ef-
fect a unity for the whole con-
cert. But the final piece by Orff
made everyone stars of the
show.
The first two selections pro-
vided a balance to the long wild
Orff piece; and yet there was no
conflict, no jarring tensions be-
tween the two sections. Each
piece fitted into a scheme of
gradually letting loose, until the
final frenzy.

Three sections from Handel's
"Utrecht Te Deum" began the
evening's entertainment. Lesser-
known than the bombastic "Det-
tigen Te Deum" of Handel, this
piece relies more on choral pow-
er and dynamism to get its
grandeur across than on trum-
pets and timpani.
But brass and drums weren't
really needed. Beginning with
"Thou art the King of Glory,"
right through to the finale
chorus of the piece "0 Lord; in
Thee have I trusted," the Chor-
ale was sharp. Plagued by just a
few ensemble difficulties in the
first chorus, they immediately
got going straight in the more
subdued "Holy, holy, holy."
I would have preferred a fast-
er tempo for the second number,
but the light, bright, distinct
singing was enough to make this
interpretation valid; the piece
worked well at this tempo due
to the performers carving out
each line, polishing each note.
Having begun in this austere

Ove rlyric chamiber
it was music from the 17th century Venetian school that the
I Madrigalisti di Venezia presented Sunday night at the Rackham
Aud.,.songs and small instrumental pieces by Italian Renaissance
composers. The. instrumentalists are skilled and trained in per-
forming this simple but beautiful music, but the singers could use
some more lessons.
. The concert opened with the prelude to Monteverdi's musical
drama "Il 1allo delle. ingrate," an orchestral piece. The 7-man
orchestra includes recorder and lute in addition to the familiar
string quartet and harpsichord continuo. Renaissance sound is thin;
the strings of the time were smaller instruments with less volume.
And it is often a problem in performing this early music on modern
instruments to keep the spacious rich tone of the strings from
destroying orchestral balance.
The five instrumentalpieces, two sonatas in trio form and
three orchestral settings of madrigals, offered no trouble at all.
The subtle synchopation, the delicate violin lines, the tempi were
exact, and the conductor's hand stayed light.
However, I was somewhat bothered by the unenthusiastic con-
tinuo part. The harpsichordist never elaborated upon the simple
cello line; .she simply chunked along with chord after chord. Only
when the lute doubled in the continuo part did any color of
rhythm come through. For a group that specializes in Renaissance
work exclusively, a more sparkling and developed Aontinuo seems
essential.
WithA the singers the problem is more serious. The three
voices, soprano, tenor, and bass, (nameless in the program notes as
were all the musicians) perform this ancient music in a much too
modern style. In ensemble their sound is thick and heavy with no
-hint of historical insight into the precise sound of Renaissance song.
I found them to be too lyric, too rich for the delicate vocal lines.
Compared to the completely restrained, airy sound of the instru-
ments, the vocalists sounded, too often, like they were singing
Wagner or Brahms.
SNo stacatto bouncing carried any of the simple madrigal tunes;
Monteverdi's "Ecco vicine o bella tigre" came off best, though I
believe the tempo and rhythm of the song provided the impetus
rather than any change in musical style on the trio's part.
All three are more than adequate singers, as was shown in the
three solo opera arias from never-performed and all but unknown
operas; but when they sing together they are Romantics, not
Renaissance stylists.
As entertainers, the Madrigalisti score high, but from a
musicological viewpoint, concentrating on performing ancient music
in an historically accurate style, the three singers are just too
passionately Italian. They should take a clue from their orchestra.
-J. P.

ftter of
religious mood, the group mov-
ed to a series of lusty songs by Jo-
hannes Brahms. The move from
spiritual thoughts to love and
the gypsy life was good prepara-
tion for the final jump to the
carnal melodies of OrffM
The Brahms' songs come from
a larger work, scored for tenor
soloist with an occasional so-
prano aria. The Chorale's in-
tact excerpts stayed mostly on
the rambunctious side, touching,
only slightly on the sorrow of
unrequited love.
The singers seemed more at
ease with the Brahms music; the
"choir'" role they performed,
well, but these jubiliant secular
songs provided a drive and dy-
namism lacking in the Handel.
Tenor Waldie Anderson w a s
soloist with the group; his voice
has that melodious Romantic
quality perfectly suited to these
songs. The spirit4 of the entire
engemble burst forth in number
ten, "Weit and breit," a bounc-
ing romp bruiting the joys and
ecstasies of love.
I would, however, suggest that
the tenor and bass sections be
enlarged. Not so much in the
Brahms, but the sopranos and
altos tended to overpower th e
men in the Handel through pure
' volume. A more balanced sound
is necessary in Baroque music
where each line has a job to do.
Piano was the simple accom-
paniment for these two pieces;
but the very exuberance and big
sound of the Chorale provided
all the necessary pomp and fire.
Yet these were just a prelude.
Finally we come to Carl Orff's
"Catulli Carmina." Written and
revised and republished in 1943,
this cantata is scored for chorus,
two soloists, pianos and percus-
sion. And it is a difficult piece
for the singers as well as the
few instrumentalists.
I was very much afraid for
the Arts Chorale when I heard
they were doing this piece be-
cause from its first few measur-
es, the work can easily fall into
pieces if not done well. But the
Arts Chorale attempted it any-
way and won. No perfection, but
close enough to a great- per-
formancegtobe really exciting
Director Maynard Klein had
quite a challenge in this score,
and his cuts and changes, made
to facilitate performance, did
little to crimp the crazy, un-
halting drive of the work. Klein
used a bass soloist for most of
the part marked senes instead
of male chorus, and he deleted
several sections from Acts II and
} ;

control
IIL. But these changes and ar-
rangements did the trick; there
were few fumbles or slips. The
piece moved..
The men lost their tight un-
ity for just an instant in section
four of Act I, but they caught
themselves immediately and
continued just as strong. I men-
tion these technique criticisms
mainly because I have so few to
cite.
Tenor Anderson sang the role
of Catullus in this story deal-
ing with Catullus's love for my-
sterious Lesbia. Most of his
arias are unaccompanied, and
his careful work provided a
more than adequate perform-
ance, though he had troubles in
certain arias, particularly sec-
tion nine.
Soprano Linda Weston, sing-
ing Lesbia, played her part well,
warm rich lows and brilliant
highs, though she could have
supplied more emotion. Daniel
Berry sang the bass part of the
old men; he was often unsteady,
but good enough to keep the sar-
casm of his role apparent.
The piece is sung with little
accompaniment except for the
beginning and' closing sections,
in which a battery of percussion
splashes and crashes and clacks,
setting the mood and tone of
whirring excitation.
It's a good feeling when one's
high hopes are fulfilled. I didn't
want to expect too much' this
early in the year from the Arts
Chorale, yet I was really hoping
for a great performance on the
Orff work. I can see now that
I had little to worry about; a
good performance of the "Catulli
Carmina" in the fall may lead
to an excellent "Carmina Bur-
ana" in the spring.
Who knows? I can hope.

DAILY OFFICIAL
F } BULLETIN
The Daily Offical Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITER form to
Room 3528 L. S. & A. Bldg., be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
um of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 71": North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m.
Student Council Conference - Divi-
siosn I:Registration, Hill Auditorium,
8:30 a.m.
Social Science Education Lecture:
Saul H. Mendlovitz, Professor of Inter-
national Law, Rutgers University, "Edu-
cation for world Order": Schorling Aud-
itorium, University School, 10:00 a.m.
, School of Music: Trumpet Students
Recital: School of Music Recital Hall,
12:30 p.m.
Department of Architecture and En-
vironmental Simulation Laboratory Lec-
ture: Alan Schmidt, Harvard Center for
Environmental Design, Laboratory for
Computer Graphics and Spatial Ana-
lysis, "Computer Graphics," A & D Aud-
itorium, 3:00 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program: APA
Repertory Coinpany in Sean O'Casey's
Cock-A-Doodle Dandy: Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theater, °8:00 p.m.
-General Notices
Directed Teaching in Elementary
Education and Special Education (Educ
D305), Winter Term 1969: Students who
have not yet verified winter Term, 1969
directed teaching applications on file
or received a time permit for directed,
teaching must do so by October 31.
These steps should be completed at, the
Directed Teaching, Office, 2292 U.H.S.
or the Special Education Office, 734
East University. Winter term assign-
ments will be made from applications
verified by October 31eand will be,
available from November 11 to No-
vember 29.

A representative from the Georgetown
University School of Law will be on
campus today to interview prospective
students. Appointments may be made
by calling Mrs. Towle, 1223 Angell Hall,
40312.
The Junior-Senior Counseling Office,
1223 Angell Hall, will have a represent-
ative from the Harvard Business School.
here on October 25th to talk with those
students interested in learning of the
schools offerings. Appointments can be
scheduled by contacting Miss Jan Ap-
ple either by telephone at 764-0310 or by
coming into the office.
December Teacher's Certificate Can-
didates: All of the requirements for the
teacher's certificate must be. complet-
ed by 'November 18th. These require-
ments include the teacher's oath and
the material for the Placement Office.
The oath should be taken as soon as
possible in room 2000 University High
School. The office is open from 8-12
and 1-5, Monday through Friday.
Michigan College Workshop on Hu-
iman Relations: Students are invited to
participate in this Workshop. November
1-3. Clear Lake Camp, Dowling, Mich-
igan (sponsored by the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jewvs). Five
scholarship grants to cover the cst of
the Workshop are available through the
Office of Religious Affairs, 2282 S.A.B.
Apply immediately.
Botany Seminar: Dr. Larry Williams,
Botany Department will speak on
"Genetic and Physical Relationship
Between Two Early Steps of Pyrimidine
Synthesis", on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 1968
at 4:15 p.m., 1139 Nat. Set. Bldg. 4
Doctoral Candidates who plan to
graduate December 14 must observe the
following deadlines: (A) Three unbound
copies of the dissertation, complete In
every way except for binding, and three
abstracts must be submitted to the
Rackham Dissertation Secretary by
Monday, October 28. (B) Two corrected
copies of the dissertation--one bound
and one unbound-two abstracts, and
the Chairman's report on the final oral
examination must. be submitted to the
Dissertation Secretary by Monday, No-
vember 25. (Fees must be paid and
paperwork completed by that second
deadline )
Flu Shots: There will be 'a "Flu
Shot" Clinic at the Health Service,
Thursday, October 24, from 8:00 - 11:30
a.m. and 1:00 - 4:30 p.m. The charge is
$1.50 for students and spouses and $2.00
for faculty, staff and spouses. Persons
who have had a "Flu Shot" since 1964
need only one this year. Persons who
require a second injection this year
may obtain it at this time.
roadcasting Service: WUOM Radio
(91.7" Mc.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.
Tuesday 1:00 p.m. The Next Fifty Years
- "A Nation's Policy for Its Future",

with Lyle C. Fitch, Herbert A. Simon
and Joseph Fisher. Tuesday 5:15 p.m.
U-M Feature Story, with Jack Hamil-
ton. Wednesday, 11:00 a.m. The Elev-
enth Hour (repeated at 7 p.m.) Ed Bur-
rows hosts an hour of news and con-
versation about' the arts and literature.
Guest: Gertrude Kurath on American
Indian music and dance. Wednesday,
1:00 p.m. The U-M Conference on Ag-
ing: Dr. Charles M. Gaitz, on "Health
in Old Age", and M. Powell Lawton on
"The Psychological Status of the Eld-
erly". Dr. Gaitz is from Baylor College
of Medicine; Mr. Lawton from the
Philadelphia Geriatric Center. Wednes-
day 4:45 p.m. Campus News, produced
by speech department students. Wed-
nesday 5:00 pm. The Press and 'World
Affairs, with Prof. Ben Yablonky. Wed-
nesday 8:00 p.m. U-M Symphony Or-
chestra Concert, Josef Blatt conductor,
broadcast live from Hill Auditorium.
Final Paym it of Fall Term Fees. Is
due and payable on or before Thursday.
October 31, 1968. If fees are not paid by
this date: 1.A $10A.00delinquent penalty
will be charged. 2, A "hold Credit" will
be placed against. you. This means that
until payment is received and "Hold,

r,

SUMMER
I GREAT BRITiAINw
Opportunities in Teaching or Social Work-
Work and Travel

A

Credit" is cancelled: (1) Grades will not
be mailed: (2) Transcripts will not be
furnished; (3) You may not register for
future terms; (4) A Senior may not
graduate with his class at the close of
the current term. 3. The Dean of your
school or college will be given a lis
of delinquent accounts. Payments ma.'1
be made in person, or mailed to the
Cashier's Office, 1015 L.S.A. Building,
before 4:30 p.m., October 31, 1968. Mail
payments postmarked after due date,
October 31. 1968 are late and subject to
penalty. Identify mail payment as tui-
tion and show complete ten digit stu-
dent number and name.
Foreign Visitors
The individuals on the following list
can be reached through the Foreign
Visitor Division of the Visitor and
Guest Relations Office, Rooms 22-24,
The Michigan Union. Telephone: 764-
2148.
Professor Frederick Rimmer: Professor
(Continued on Page 3) k

Thurs., Oct. 24
7:30 P.M.
Room 21 2-,-SAB

Winant Volunteers
Kenneth Prideaux-Brune
British Representative
Will be on Campus

i*

Please come or call 769-3468
for information

I

IL

I

. . . . ._NTIwOnua AL In.GO~t '.NU' .J IYa~fU a_

MON.-FRI.-7:15-9:1 5 :N ANA ER T CRAE710
SUN.-- ':15-3:15-5:15
7:1$-9:15 FO IL6
SAT.-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15 375 No. MAPLE RD.-7691300
INmILCE sH
Aul Bnito~ as' s HOWING
t*. ____

D

LOOKING FOR A MEANINGFUL CHALLENGE?
LOOKING FOR SELF-FULFILLMENT?
If you are between 18 and 30
PARTICIPATE' ;

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SHERUT LA'AM
Volunteer Service Corps for Israel
ONE YEAR
If' you are "a professi6nal, college graduate or
undergraduate, you are needed osa teacher,
instructor, tutor, technician, nuse, social worker,
etc.
For an experience in communal living you may
loin the full year Kibbutz program on a border
Kibbutz or elsewhere.
ORIENTATION AND ULPAN
Knowledge of Hebrew not essential. Before de-
parture there is an orientation, seminar followed
by a three-month Ulpan, intensive Hebrew study
in Israel.
COST
$670 round-trip air fare and orientation costs.
NEXT DEPARTURES
July, 1969 for Prof. and Semi-Prof.
Sept., 1969, Kibbutz Participation.
Limited number of partial loans. Available to
professionals only.

SHERUT LA'AM SPECIAL
NEW PROJECT
TWO YEARS
If you are a professional, college graduate or
undergraduate entering your junior yea, you can
paticipate in one year of wqrk followed by one
year of study at an institute of higher learning
in Israel. Year of study -,ill be covered by ade-
quate scholarship; same cost as one-year pro-
gram; some departure dates.
VOLUNTEERS FOR
ISRAEL PROGRAM
(.I.P.)
Any assignment upon arrival in Israel, living and
working in a lKibbutz or Moshav with the possi-
bility of Special work projects or border Kibbutz
placements arising from new circumstances in
Israel.
H EBREW, LECTURES AND
SEMINARS AVAILABLE

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Whatever else you do
LOOK FOR

on Nov. 5th

UNITE

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on the ballot

COST
$570 ound-trip air fare.
NEXT DEPARTURE
January 1969 and approximately every
months thereafter,

four

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Rent your
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Program Information - 5-6290
HIGHEST RATING !
"AN ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT!"-- NY. Doily News
i the PAUL NEWMAN producion a
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More Informotion
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V.I.P.
Application
Forms

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Next: "BARBARELLA"

'V

i

1

III Ii-

NEWMAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION

COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
Democrat, 7th District (2nd Ward)
presents
"The most ebullient and engaging folk
dance troupe since the brillianf doiseu
yev dancers from Moscow! We flip ped!
-WALTER TERRY, Saturday Review *
FOlBALT
--COMPANY OF 100 - ....
"THESE ROMANIANS GO WITH THE
BEST OF THEM."- Barne:, N. Y. Time:
"A gay and completely winning eve-
ning's entertainment" - W::I'J.Y.News
"YOUNG, HANDSOME, EXUBERANT, THE ROMANIANS
ARE SOMETHING SPECIAL" -Johnson. N.Y.Poat
THURS.,. OCT. 24, 8:30

II

CITY.

HOMECOMING 1968
DIONNE WARWICK will appear in concert with Scooey Mitchell
on OCT. 24 at 8:30 in the Events Building. BILL COSBY will
appear with the Pair Extraordinaire on OCT. 26 at 8:30 in the
Events Building. Tickets for both concerts are still available at
the S.A.B. ticket booth.

0

S

TATE-

al

Z IP

NAME
ADDRESS

K1LLAN

McDONNELL

{:a
!
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fi
I E
II
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PENTACOSTALISM: AN ASSESSMENT
A professor of theology at St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota, Fr. McDonnell
holds a Licentiate in Catholic theology from the University of Ottawa and a doctorate in Pro-
testant theology from the University of Trier in Germany. His research at ecumenical institutes
or universities in Paderbom, Geneva, Paris, Oxford, and Edinburgh has received wide acclaim.
His books include John Calvin, the Church and the Eucharist, Nothing But Christ, and The
Restless Christian. Fr, McDonnell contributes frequently to such magazines and journals as
Worship, Commonweal, America and Journal of Ecumenical Studies. A member of the Na-
tional Presbyterian-Catholic dialogue, of the Ecumenical Institute on the Spiritual Life, and
tk. ..rvnAmt. .Ar. Ac,.-+,.. ,.4 +t isnsitute forEumeninl nndl Culturnl Research. Kilian Mc-

Tickets for the HOMECOMING DANCE
are available'on the Diag Today
Price is s5c
BUSSES will be provided from North Campus to
the University Events Building for both concerts.

I.

*

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,

Mill1

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