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October 18, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-18

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Page Two,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 1.8, 1968

P~e Two.~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-Ida, Ocobe.1. 1968

music
Brother: Too much for the Grande kids

Cal protests support
Cleaver, grape strike
(Continued from Page l At about the same time about
by Peter Townsend, a black stu- 800 students rallied at the Berk-
dent, Regent Philip Boyd resumed eley campus in support of the
the meeting without discussion re- Mexican American Student Con-
ferring to Townsend as "boy" federation's (MASC) proposed
I nce b tt

By W. REXFORD BENOIT
Hundreds of kids went to the
Grande Ballroom in Detroit
Tuesday.
Why?
An original famous good-,
time-dope-blues-juice west coast
band - that's breaking up soon
was there to play a concert, but
few present ;seemed:.to.care.
Come on, people. Your clothes
were really beautiful, but you
didn't listen to the music.
Janis Joplin, Peter Gurley,
and the rest of Big Brother
make magical moments all the
time, and you probably cooled
yourselves right .out of some real
fun.
At 9:17, Janis sang the first
words of Big Brother's "Final
Concert Together in the Motor
City.",
"COOOOMMME AWN," she
yelled, two full tones sharp.
"Yea," the crowd said, half-
heartedly.
My wife, ever attuned to such
things, noticed (by leaning per-
ilously around a big speaker on"
the stage) that Janis was wear-

ing baggy pants, a thin chain
link belt, a frilly crepe blouse,
and l'ots of her famous bracelets.
It's all part of the magic.
I didn't see Janis at all. It
was too crowded and so hot
where we were pressed into a
corner that my glasses fogged.
Three songs later, Peter Gur-
ley had made it clear why he'll
be famous too when Janis leaves
Big Brother by playing some
well-chosen notes on his guitar.
Z tried to get onto the stage,,
figuring that total sensory in-
volvement also reliedeonbeing
able to see, but the heat had
shortened tempers and who
wants to see a press pass in the
middle of Joplin's rendition of
"Summertime?"
If ever people could get blast-
ed on a personal appearance,
this was the night.
Of all the directions the blues
took when dope rock grew up in
America, the poly-everything
Cream, ' the austere Siegel-Sch-
wall, the later effuse - though
skilled-Butterfield and Bloom-
field, and Big Brother develop-
ed closest to the people.

You've done better,
Yo '- n Baroque Trio .
By JIM PETEkS
I was hoping that the old locker-room pep talk at half-time
would once again be successful, would once ,again turn a not-so-good
performance into an excellent one. But last night at the Rackham
Aud. the Michigan Baroque Trio 'needed more than intermission-
time encouragement, needed something which they never got.
Their program featured various trio sonatas by German, Italian,
and French composers-music which demands not only expert playing
to keep its form intact, but also keenly sensitive interpretation to
prevent it from sounding like chunks of chords under flimsy solo
lines.
The thing which surprised me most is that the Trio was lacking
in both areas last night. Oboist Florian i Mueller has had better
evenings, to be sure. Throughout the first half of the concert, his
playing, seemed tense and unsure. Not only his unsteady technique,
but also his very cold sound tended to weaken each piece.
This aura of uninspiration crept even into the continuo line.
Lawrence. hurst played the bass line on double bass, while Charles
Fisher provided the accompaniment on harpsichord.
But how tight and academic the continuo line was; the proces-
sion of chords was hardly elaborated upon by Fisher. The continuo
line needs to move freely and improvisationally to keep these Baroque
miniatures alive.
' Sonde of the missing sparkle appeared in the minuet and gigue
of the Handel "Trio Sonata in G major," as well as in the E minor
sonata of Loeillet, but it wasn't until the final piece that the musi-
cians finally got together and began to make music, in Niccolo Jom-
melli's "Trio Sonata in D major."
However,the- second half of the concert offered some pretty
capable. singing from bass Willias Patterson. Performing arias from
two German cantatas, Patterson got things moving with "Endlich,
endlich wird mein Joch" from Bach's "Cantata No. 56," although his
first. selection by George Benda just plodded along due to the un-
delineated instrurnental lines.
The fast novements had little punch and, often; poor ensemble;
the slow movement lacked coherence. This mediocrity was amazing;
to me, especially since in the last selection the bright strong sound
of the Trio reappeared-something I had expected all along.

If you had a choice between
taking 'Janis Joplin or Gracie
Slick to a. party, you k n o w
you'd take Janis. Remember,
Big Brother played background
music for 'Frisco chapter Hell's4
Angel's parties, and that's about
as close to the earth as you can
get.
Many groovers today are tir-'
ed of people singing about
nightmares, good trips, bad
trips, Greek heroes, colored haz-
es and are completely turned off
by electronic overkill.
(Silver Apples; a band from
New York, has lost its personnel
and replaced all but two with
'switches' and amps. Now, it's'
down to a drummer and a pedal
pusher.)
So that's what's exciting about
Janis and Peter Gurley. Some-y
times they're so blasted they
hardly make it onto the'stage.
But they play and s i n g like
they're glad they got there.Y
We tried to stay until theyw
quit. But it was depressing that
no one cheered.
So we began to work our way
out, antagonizing d u 11 people
sitting on the floor with vapid
faces by stepping on their fin-
gers and toes. Smallrevenge.
On the way out, we passed
Uncle Russ' office, which re-
minded me to bitch t h a t he
charged five dollars for the
scene.
If you went, and laid out the
bread, you might have preferred
to dig t h e storefront revival
meeting a block a w a y where
people did a lot of responding
to the man up in front.
If you didn't make the trek,
you might have five surplus dol-
lars with which to buy their al- Daily-Andysacs
bum, "Cheap Thrills." It means Earth-jowei-: Joplncomes oil
what it says.
/1
Toigt:WAY DOWN iT
7 :00 & 9 :05
75c Maode in 1920 by D. W. Griffith, "the
macn wh nvented Hlyood." Starng
ARCHITECTURE Lilion Gish, who "risked her life and
AUDITRo IUM foze her hand" to mnake the dr aati
Fifth night of he ice scenes in "Way Down East,"
D. W. Griffith Festival H
tF

Students immediately began
chanting "Now!" and "Change!"
until it became obvious the regents'
did not intend to deal with the re-
solutions. About 200 students walk-
ed out. As they left, one black
student shrugged, "You just hung;
yourself, baby. Good luck, man."
One girl was pushed through the
only dining hall door still open as
campus police guarded the other
entrances. She went in, the regents
recessed, asking her to leave.
When she asked, "Why?" Chancel-
lor Dean McHenry told her she
was suspended and had one hour
to get off campus. Cops then hust-
led her out.
Hitch told the committee, "On
later reflection I have decided it
would be wrong to amend that ac-
tion (denial of credit for Cleav-
er's course and the one-lecture'
limit) before I have had a chance
to explore this matter more fully
with the academic senate."
By the time Hitch had finished
talking about the Cleaver case,
about 500 students were outside.
As the regents went into a closed
executive session, students chant-
ed, "F Reagan, F
Reagan, F Reagan."

s ycoc .
The Berkeley student govern-
ernment supported the class boy-
cott last night in an 11-0 vote
with two abstentions.
Whether the regents will con-
sider the Mexican American stu-
dents, demands tomorrow is ques-
tionable. But the Cleaver course
credit will certainly come up.
And when it does no one really
expects them to change their ear-
lier position since only three re-
gents have demonstrated support
for giving the _course credit.
As Thursday's meeting broke
up, a few regents got away quick-
ly. But about a half-dozen others
were caught up in the crowd of
students who tried to ask them
questions.
Most regents spoke briefly with
the 'students and politely tried to
slip away. But one 30-year vete-}
ran, regent Edwin Pauley, walked
away grumpling about hecklers.y
"I'm not heckling," a student
.implored; trailing behind him. "I'm
just trying to talk to you, Mr.
Pauley. Will you please talk to
me?"

DIAL 5-6290
4th and
FINAL
WEEK
WINNER BEST PICTURE
VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
SE4
. . . l.
dii
JOUR
with
CATHERINE DENEUVE,
Next: "Inadmissable Evidence"

9

"An Exuberant Comic Fantasy ..
'Cock-a-doodle' has a lift "
-Detroit Ne'ws.

I

3y,
ean
O'Casey
Directed by Jack O'Brien
Music by Bob James

MON.-FR.-7:15-9:15
t g. 11 - 155-5:15
7:15-9:15
SAT.-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
IN I E 70
t ILE ago2

1ANL 6ENERCOPTON IA
FOX EASTER~N THEATRE~
FOX VILL3GE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"7691340
SHOWING
.Bi{L

I I

_.

2 EXCITING NEW PLAYS!
A powerful and prophetic An imaginative and
play by the daring .young provocative new play by
Czech liberal leader. the author of
967 Prague success --Blackboard Jungle."
now banned)T W
PREIER: -HE~~m'OTHE WORED PREM ERE OF

t

i

by
EVAN HUNTER
MON., FEB. 3- SAT., FEB. 8

4
*

I

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WGieGReart i aLoel Cuntec
pchndcolor- T-mW' fts-5e cArts
l A5GZA BAZQrT TAGYriv KA4 CHI 6 f *Gt M PK Y RU i GWI C~ary T Y~~~ owS NDRA I CKF

fI

Directed by
Distaguisked Ir adway Cas t! MARCELLA CISNEY

r

.

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