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October 17, 1968 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-17

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October

17, 1968

Page Six THE MICHtGAN DAILY Thursday, October 17, 1968

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AIR PIRACY INCREASING:

Is F Stone'sneak's

Jet hijackings create new concernon 'our murk times'

E l

LONDONT (ATT iP) -"WXhat v- ..,.I m .-..,and n+1,. nnrp ,.rl i..

I'. ' - IVu JyUI, VV kw a
afraid of," said an airline official
in London, "is that some day some
silly so-and-so will poke a gun into
the back of the neck of the pilot
and order him into an airport that
he doesn't know, or that isn't
equipped to handle his plane. He'll
be forced to risk a landing, plunk
down his plane and crash."
He was talking about the score
of hijackings or attempted hijack-
ings that have taken place this
year.
So far there have been no prov-
en fatalities on Western commer-
cial airlines as a result of hijack-
ings. All planes seized on sched-
uled flights have been returned.
But pilots, airline officials, law-
yers, insurance specialists, govern-

mens no a .ines cocnema .wic
civil aviation are searching for a
solution to the growing problem.
The consensus among them is
that the only defense devised so
far is a piece of paper-an inter-
national convention pledging na-
tions to return hijacked planes and
the people aboard, and to assist
where possible in prosecution of
the hijackers.
Progress is slow. The convention
was drafted five years ago at an
international meeting in Tokyo.
Prompted by this summer's hi-
jacking of an Israeli plane, the
September meeting of the Interna-
tional Civil Aviation Organization
urged its member nations to ratify
the convention and bring it into
force. The United States promised

to do so by the end of the year.,
Cuba, the frequent destination of
hijackers, supported the plan.
The International Federation of
Airline Pilots Associations, based
in London, wants an even stronger
agreement to permit prosecution
under something like the maritime
piracy laws. This seems unlikely
and might not do much good. The
U.S. Congress applied the piracy
laws to aircraft hijacks in 1961,
but aerial pirates usually flee to
politically friendly states and are
not extradited.
Although hijacking has o v e r-
tones of piracy, it is something
new. The crime itself has no pre-
cise international definition. It
usually lacks the element of out-
right robbery that characterized
pirates seeking plunder. M o s t
hijackers simply want to get from
one point to another. They cannot
sell a stolen commercial airliner,
The problems of punishing hi-
jackers are clouded by the legal'
concept of territoriality - which
means that states punish crimes
taking place on their own terri-
tory. Hijacking often takes place
over international waters. The hi-
jacker soon leaves the flying piece
of territory on which he commits
his crime.
Under extradition laws, his
crime - often defined as endan-
gering the safety of a flight or
only a simple assault - may not
be regarded as serious enough to
warrant his return home. Cuban

officials have refused to discuss

what happened to the
who flew there.

hijackers

Peter Martin, a leading inter-
national aviation lawyer and co-
editor of the standard British text-,
book on air law, says:
"Hijacking of aircraft is, in}
effect, a form of armed robbery
with violence. As with murder,
there is no sanction on earth
strong enough to deter a potential
hijacker from taking an aircraft
if he wishes to do so. Worse, there
is no real possibility of restrain-
ing an armed and determined man
in an aircraft and the consequenc-
es of doing so could be catastro-
phic.
"The safety of the passengers
and crew is paramount. The return
of the aircraft is secondary but
also very important. It must there-
fore be made a matter of interna-
tional agreement to punish hijack-'
ers in the state where they have
forced the aircraft to land, and to
facilitate the return of the crew
and the passengers and of the air-
craft itself."
In Martin's view the Tokyo con-
vention would be a first step but
a necessary one. He suggests that
if some nations held out against
ratification, others might threaten
to withdraw landing rights to their
airliners. Martin sees another pos-
sible lever that might work quick-'
ly:
"The insurance markets of the
world would unequivocaly refuse
to give cover for aircraft flying to
states not parties to the conven-
tion. Airlines would soon bring
pressure on their governments to
ratify if they had to run the risk
of meeting the costs of losing an
aircraft out of their own purses."

(Continued from page 1)
Adding personal perplexion to
some inciteful insights, Stone con-
tinued:
"What do you say to blacks who
can't get past unskilled labor in
this society and whose families are
rotting on the outskirts? Do you
tell them not to riot when youj
know that no one will give a damn
unless there is violence?"
But if Stone senses the need
for the alienated and the disen-
Write-wIn
declared
-n I
inalid
(Continued from Page 1)
write-in stickers have been dis-
tributed, and a new batch is on
the way. -
Ross admitted that the Kelley
move caught him "not looking,"
but Kelley's opposition had been
known for some time. On Sept. 25,
Kelley issued a "letter opinion"
declaring the write-in votes void.
However, this was moredor less an
informal statement and held no
legal weight.
When he issued his formal rul-
ing yesterday, he surprised the
McCarthy backers since they be-
lieved the "lettersopinion" was as
far as the attorney general would
go.
Ross sees Kelley's ruling as
preventing "an individual - from
voting for whomever he pleases."
According to the Constitution, if
the political parties don't provide
the candidate a voter wants, he
can vote for someone else, Ross
said.

franchised to "hate back" after
yeais of humiliation, he also knows
the ugliness of the end result.
"There has to be some disorder,
some violence on the edges. But
what do, you do after that? We
don't need more excuses for war."
Stone. who has disavowed shrill
polemics in his carefully docu-
menteds critiques of government,
does put his faith in the earnest-
ness of youth despite his dislike
of its harshness.
Young people who are willing to
look for answers but who were
skeptical enough not to be satis-
fied with any, are what Stone
calls "a stumbling block in the
path of man's collective egotism."
"I guess it means living on
simple faith, learning to take joy
and pleasure in an almost hopeless
struggle. Almost hopeless, but ulti-
mately a struggle that will be
One listener asked Stone if his
speech was a religious confession.
"I'm a religious atheist," laughed
Stone, "because I can't believe a
beneficent Gol could be respon-
sible for a world like this."
rStone's fervor, though, did con-
tain a strange combination of
evangelism and honesty that ap-
pealed directly to those who have
lost their innocence but not their
idealism.
"You should believe deeply and
you should be willing to put your
life on the line for what you be-
alieve. But you need to be skeptical,
especially or yourself. Otherwise
xuI V1A, out of the best intentions,
en I up being unuk ually cruel to
everyone who doesn't believe what
you do."
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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Try Daily

To Swap?
Classifieds

------

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