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October 15, 1968 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-15

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Tuesday, October 15, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Poge Seven

Tu s aO t b r11 1 6 HE M C G N D I YPge e

Hines, Matson,

start

U. s.

ball

,By The Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - Randy Mat-
son, the mammoth shot put king
from Pampa, Tex., and sprinter
Jim Hines of Texas Southern won1
America's first g o 1d medals as
United States track and field
strength asserted itself at the
Olympic Games yesterday.
Americans captured two other
medals with George Woods of Los
Angeles taking the silver in the
shot put behind Matson and
Charlie Greene of Seattle finishing
third for the bronze behind Hines
in the 100-meter dash.
Hines put on a spectacular fin-
Michigan's Ron Iptschinski,
after surviving Sunday's, quali-
fying' runs, faded yesterday in
his preliminary heat from sec-
and to fifth in the stretch and
failed to make today's medal
field of eight. Only top four in-
ishers in each preliminary qual-
ified for the finals.
ish and:was timed in 9.9 seconds
for tie 100, shattering the Olym-
pic record and tying the pending
world mark.
Matson heaved the 16-pound;
ball 67 feet, 4% inches and won
the shot put by better than a foot
over/ teammate Woods.
The 6-foot-61/, 265-pound giant,

dai Y
s IPo rtS
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL DINNER
who finished .second to America's
Dallas Long at Tokyo four years
ago, had shattered the Olympic
record with a qualifying heave of
67-101/ Sunday. He holds t h e
world record at 71-51/2.
Woods, a 300-pounder, was sec-
ond with a toss of 66 feet, 1/4
inch. Russia's Eduard Ouschin
took the bronze medal with 65-11,
accounting for his country's first
medal of the, Games.
Dave Maggard" of Mountain
View, Calif., America's other shot
put qualifier, finished fifth with
63-9.
Hines thrilled a crowd of 65,000
packed into the Olympic Stadium
.with his spectacular performance.
He beat Lennox Miller, a Southern;
California student from Jamaica,
who was second, and Greene.
Hines, Greene and Ronnie Ray

Smith of San Jose, Calif., all have
marks of 9.9 up for recognition in
the event. The Olympic 100 car-
ries with it, even if unofficially, ti-
tle of the world's fastest human.'
Shortly after Matson had given
the United States its first gold
medal, Hines and Greene, w h o
both had won thei' semifinal
heats, went alfter the 100 crown.
After one false start, the field got
off with Greene apparently hold-
ing a slight lead at 40 meters.
Then Hines put on a tremen-
dous burst of speed and( won by
at least one meter over Miller.
After 'Hines passed the finish
line, he jogged back and hugged
Greene in joy. The two are long-,
time friends and rivals. Then he
wandered jubilantly in front of
the stands, waving to the.crowd
as the spectators roared their ap-
proval.

oiling
Bob Seagren and John Pennel,
America's premier pole vaulters,
soared over the qualifying height
of 16 feet, 1 inch to gain the final
Wednesday. But K C. Carrigan,
a 17-year-old schoolboy from Or-
ting, Wash., who has cleared 17
feet, failed three times and was
eliminated. He was one of two
nonqualifiers in a group of" 13.
Jarvis Scott of Los Angeles and
15-year-old Esther Stroy of Wash-
ington, D.C., moved into the semi-
finals of the women's 400-meter
run with second place finishes in
their preliminary heats.
The United States, defending
basketball champions in the Olym-
pic basketball tournament, steam-
rollered Senegal 93-36 for an im-
pressive second straight triumph.
The American five led by 6-
foot-8 Spencer Haywood, stormed
to a 44-15 halftime advantage over
the outmanned Africans and con-
tinued 'to pull away in the final
minutes.
Senegal managed to tie the
score 6-6 at 3;06 but then was held
scoreless for more than nine min-
utes while the U.S. ran off 19
straight points.
Haywood, a 19-year-old colle-
gian from Detroit, paced the U.S.
attack with 16 points. Bill Hosket
6-foot-7 Ohio State grad, tossed
in 14 points and Charley Scott of
the University of North Carolina
added 12.
It was the 68th straight victory
without a defeat for the U.S. in
Olympic competition since the
game was introduced into the in-
terntaional competition in 1932.
The Americans will play the Phil-
ippines today. They downed
Spain 81-46 in their opener Sun-
day.

Vvhel C pizza .(1is falwys(j>
in go ast"'
ILLAGE
- - T --
® 1f VPIZZA IPARLOR
Sing along entertainment with Charlie
and Kate, Wed.-Sun., 81
Come in and sample the widest selec
tion of imported beer in Ann Arbor-18
kinds.
Crisp, cold salads served with your fov-

i ;
JIMMY IJINES of the U.S. break

Bob Hayes won the 100 in 1964 to win the vold medal in Olymp
at Tokyo with a 10.0. He t h e n shattered the Olympic recordm
signed a professional football ,,n- American, Charlie, Greene (r),
tract and has starred as a flank-:
er with the Dallas Cowboys. rica Viscopoleanu took the golda
Angela Nemeth of Hungary won medal with a world's record !eap
the gold medal in the women's
javelin with a toss of 198 feet, % of 22 feet, 4% inches.2
inch. Rumania's Mihaela Penes The old mark was 22-2% held
took the silver medal a n d Eva by Englands Mary Rand. That
Janke of' Austria was the bronze was also the Olympic record. See-
winneru ond was Sheila Sherwood of Great
In the m - Britain and Tatjana Talysheva:of

MEN ON THE MOVE:,
Expansion draft shuffles NL teams]

By The Associated Press
MONTREAL - The San Diego
Padres tapped outfielder Ollie
Brown as the No 1 selection and
the Montreal Expos raided the
Pittsburgh Pirates for three aging
stars-Maury Wills, Donna Clen-
denon and Manny Mota-in yes-
terdays National League expan--
sion draft.
Two other major names were
selected on the second round
with Montreal taking outfielder
Jesus Alou of' San Francisco and
San Diego picking- shortstop
Zoilo Versalles of Lod Angeles.
Having lost the coin flip for the'
first round, the Expos selected

Mota, not necessarily their No. 1
choice from the Pirate roster butl
the player they felt Pittsburgh
was most likely to add to their
protected list once the first roundu
was over.
The Expos - apparently were
right,, for Clendenon was still
available at the start of the sec-
ond round and Wills was available
at the! start of the third.
rThre was one first-round de-
velopment greeted with consider-
able eyebrow raising-the selec-
tion of Dave Giusti by the Padres
as their second pick.
Giusti had been acquired by St.
LQuis just. after the World Series

Gridde Pickings'
In- the unpredictable world of football, the Gridde Pickings
alone, remains ;s the bastion of stability predictability. As in the
weeks before, there' again was a winner, the talented Roy Gordet.
"Immortal Roy." will long be remembered by football progonosti-
cators, for possessing the temerity to predict a Michigan victory
over State.
But,' one can not help thinking of .all these latent predicting-
power GiIdde Pickings.
If the material gain of one beautiful Cottage Inn pizza is not
sufficiently stimulating, then just ask Roy of all the personal satis-
faction and confidence -he has gained. So, get those entries in by
Friday midnight and follow in Roy's footpaths.

last week in a trade that sent
catcher Johnny Edwards to Hous-
ton.
It had been generally expected
that the Cardinals would include
diusti among their 15 protected'
players.
The ,Padres other first round
picks in order were: pitcher Dick
Selma from the New York Mets,
infielder Jose Arcia from the Chi-
cago Cubs and, pitcher Al Santo-
rini from Atlanta.
After Mota, the Expos selected
outfielder Mack Jones from Cin-
cinnati, Catcher John Bateman
from Houston, infielder-outfielder
Gary Sutherland from Phildadel-
phia and pitcher John Billingham
from Los Angeles.
On the second round, Montreal
picked besides Clendenon and
Alou pitchers Mike Wegener from
Philadelphia. Skip Guinn from
Atlanta and Bill Stoneman from
Chicago.
San Diego's second round picks
in order were: Pitcher Clay Kirby
of St. Louis catcher Fred Kendall
of Cincinnati, outfielder Jerry Mo-
rales of -New York, outfielder Nate
Colbert of Houston and Versailles.
Former American Leaguer Jim
Mud Cat Grant was selected by
Montreal in the fourth round of
the draft.
-N

Russia was third.
Jay, Silvester, a 245-pound in-
surance salesman from Smithfield,
Utah, broke the Olympic discus
record with an opening throw of
207 feet, 9% inches to lead three
U'S. qualifiers into today's finals.
Silvester, 31, is the world record
holder in the event and has a
mark of 224-5 pending.
Al Oerter, the 32-year-old de-
fender who is, going after an un-
,precedented fourth gold medal
in the event, set the old Olympic
record of 202-1% four years ago
at Tokyo. Monday the 260-pound-
er from West Islip, N.Y., did 194-9,
fifth best among the 12 qualifiers.
Gary Carlsen of Los Angeles was

-Associated Press
ks the tape in the 100-meter dash
pie competition yesterday. Hines
with a 9.9 dash; while another
finished third.
I one notch ahead of Oerter with a
toss of 198-0%.
Wyomia Tyus, the defending
Olympic champ from Griffin, Ga.,
and Barbara Ferrell of Los An-
geles each won' a .pair of prelimi-
nary heats in the women's 100-
meter dash zipping into today's
semi-finals along with Margaret
Bailes of Eugene, Ore
Miss Tyus ran her second heat
in 11.0 seconds, one-tenth faster
than the world record she shares
with Miss Ferrell and Polish
sprinters Irena Kirszenstein and
EwaiKlobukowska. But her time
was disallowed because of an aid-
ng wind of 2.7 meters peg second.
The wind also erased Miss Fer-
rell's 11.1 clocking in the next heat
then dipped below the 2.0 meters-
per-second limit as M i s a Kirs-
zenstein again matched the mark
in her heat.
Wilma Rudloph of the U.S. zip-
ped to an 11.0 Olympic clocking
in winning at Rome in 1960, has
been officially recognized.

r [

;

orite pizza
setting.

in our comfortable rustic

3411 Washtenaw

- Just West of Arborland-

971-5900

...there is no career that cai match business in diversity
of intellectual interest . . . A vigorous, free society calls for
the highest type of business leadership , ~
THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
invites you to megt its Admissions Representative' MR. TERRY
MAHURON, Assistant to the Dean of Admissions, on October
21, to discuss the Stanford M.B.A. and Ph-D. Programs in'
Administration. Appointments to meet with Mr. Mahuron
may be made through
DR. EVART W. ARmis,
Director of Placement.
The M.B.A. Program is a two-year general management course
particularly designed for students 'who have majored in
liberal arts, humanities, science, and engineering. The purpose,
of the Doctoral Program is to train scholars for the stimu-
lating challenge open to busin'ess educators, researchers, and
innovators.

CIVIL ENINEERS
WASHINGTON STATE
DEPARTMENT OF
H IGHWAYS
Highway engineering is a re-
warding career and the State of
Washington is an exciting place
to work and live. Every phase
of highway civil engineering is
employed in the Washington
Highway Department.
Representatives from the Wash-
ington Department of Highways
will be on the University of Mi-
chigan campus, Thursday, Octo-
ber 24, 1968 interviewing civil
engineers. , Iterested students
please signup for an interview
at your campus engineering
placement office.

i

1. MICHIGAN at Indiana

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

(pick score)
Wisconsin at Iowa
Minnesota at Michigan State
Illinois at Notre Dame
Northwestern at Ohio State
Wake Forest at Purdue
Iowa State at Oklahoma
Pittsburgh atNavy
Syracuse at Penn State
Virginia Military at The
Citadel

11. Alabama at Tennesseei
12. UCLA at California
13. Cornell at Harvard
14. Missouri at Nebraska
15. Arizona State vs. Oregon State
16. Texas Tech vs. Mississippi
State
17. Florida at North Carolina
18. Stanford vs. Washington State
19. Southern Mississippi at
Mississippi
20. Ursinus at Muhlenburg

LET US STYLE YOUR
HAIR TO FIT YOUR
PERSONALITY

I

* 8 BARBERS
* No Waiting
The Dascola
Near Michigan'

Barbers
Theatre

I

a

VOICE-SDS

GIVE...
A PINT OF BLOOD
To supplement a fund for needy students who will then be able to
receive ALL the blood they need FREE when they are injured.
So that' hardship cases in Ann Arbor might be able to have the
blood they couldn't ordinarily afford.
The Red Cross Blood Clinic will be in the Michigan Union Ballroom
Thursday and Friday, 10:00 to 4:00.
The students and citizens of the Ann Arbor area are counting on you.
Give . . so that others might live.
Sponsored' by Michigan Interfraternity council

Right now we're in communications,
military command and control, air traffic control,
transportation, medical information, education,
urban planning. We have openings for systems
engineers, electronic engineers, systems
analysts, mathematicians.
ON CAMPUS, OCT. 21-22
SIGN UP NOW AT THE PLACEMENT OFFICE...h'"
An Equa Opporunity mploye
Or rie fr ore information: Mr LJ Glinos. College Relations Coordi
nator The MITRE corporation, 4000 Middlesex Turnpike, Bedford, Mass.

Tues., 7:30,2nd floor, S.A.B.
* Academic Reform
" Election Issues

I

!

i

Education Committee No. 2
Meeteing Thursday, 4:00 2nd floor S.A.B.

r

A

TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 8 P.M., Multipurpose Room, Undergrad Library
"'THE UNIVERSITY IN AMERICAN SO (ETY-
AN END OF: IDEOLOOY" r

UNIVERSITY CHARTER & CALEDONIAN AIRWAYS
EUROPE FLIGHTS 1969
SIGN-UP
ON
BOEING 707 JET AIRCRAFT
FLIGHT 1--May 7-June 24 7 wks. $199
FLIGHT 6*-Dec. 21-Jan. 8 Christmas Holidays $175 FRIDAY, OCT. 18 3 P.M. Rm. 100
FLIGHT 2-May 15-Aug. 20 14 wks. $204 TUESDAY, OCT. 22 6 P.M. Rm. 150
FLIGHT 3-June 27-Aug. 25 81/2 wks. $229
FLIGHT 4-June 2-June 29 4 wks. $199 WEDNESDAY OCT 23 6 P.M Rm 150
FLIGHT,5-July 8-Aug. 17 6 wks. $214 -. -

MICHAEL NOVAK suggests that the university is to
our society what the church once was. "Radical stu-
dents turn upon their professors as protestant re-
formers upon complacent and powerful medieval
churchmen. . . The students protestonts are saying
that the old doctrines are wrong, the theories are
inadequate, the 'professors are blind to too many
realities of life. The reformation is theoretical as
well as practical. We have torevise our conception
of knowledgeand of the role of science, our view of

All flights are
DETROIT-LONDON-DETROIT

HUTCHENS HALL
LAW SCHOOL)

WAIT LISTS WILL BE TAKEN
for each flight.

FX: x 'n<4?ry

ourselves and of the world. The issues involved, in

I 11

I

II I - '-- ~ . - . __

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