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October 15, 1968 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-15

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Page- Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 15, 1968

Page1Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, October 15, 1968

UNDERGROUND
THUR$DAY
Vth Forum
GO GO
BAHAMAS
8 FABULOUS DAYS
7 GLORIOUS NIGHTS
$17900
Dec. 27th-Jon. 3rd,
INCLUDES:
* Round trip jet air fare.
* 7 Nights accommoda-
tions at the famous
Freeport Inn
*'7 Great happy hours
PLUS, PLUS, PLUS
$50 Holds Your Reservations
CALL:
Your Campus Representative
DICK RINI, 769-0226
ar
STUDENTOURS, 886-0844

OSU WINS:
artans: more stats, less score °S'"I"y

I

By JOE MARKER other Aone of their freque~nt inva-,

Last Saturday 102,789 scream-
ing fans jammed the Michigan
football oval for the 61st renewal'
of the Midwest's bitterest football
rivalry. For those readers who did
not see the game-either because
they could not latch on to tickets
or because they were too inebriat-
ed to appreciate the gridiron an-
tics (and there were many in the
latter category) here are the bare
statistics:
First downs: MSU 25, Mich. 16.
Plays run: MSU 90, Michigan 55.
Rushing yardage: MSU 295,
Michigan 243.
Passing yardage: MSU 61,
Michigan 177.
However, the winner of the
battle of statistics is not neces-
sarily the, winner of the war.
Michigan won the game, 28-14,
simply because they were able to
reverse the momentum when it
was against them, while State
could not.
Late in the third quarter, with
the Maize and Blue hanging on to
a 13-6 lead, State mounted an-

.

sions into Michigan territory. With
monotonous regularity tailbacks
Don Highsmith and Earl Ander-
son pounded the Michigan line for
substantial yardage. Barely two
minutes into the final quarter,
Anderson lugged the ball three
yards to the apparently equalizing
touchdown.
As Charlie Wedermeyer knelt
for the tying conversion attempt,
Wolverine fans anxiously awaited
Michigan's next chance to break
the expected tie.
But no! Little Charlie straight-
ened up and fired a pass to Frank
Foreman for two points and and
the lead.
One could almost feel the de-
flation of the Michigan enthu-
siasm as they awaited another
Wolverine fourth quarter collapse.
Michigan was stopped cold after
the ensuing kickoff, and the time
was ripe for State to 'finish off
their poor neighbors. But the
Michigan defense stiffened, for-
cing the .Spartans to punt and
giving Michigan the ball deep in

its own territory. Two passes
brought the ball out to the 47
yard line.
Then Dennis Brown connected
with Jim Mandich for 53 yards
and the go-ahead touchdown on a
broken play which Coach Bump
Elliott later described accurately
as, "not going exactly the way we
planned it." A two-point conver-
sion pass to Garvie Craw restored.
the Wolverones' seven point lead.
Now Michigan had the momen-
tum in its favor and it remained
to be seen whether State could
come back. The answer wasn't
long in coming, as Michigan
scored again a few minutes later
to ice the Victory.
Although most fans, in remem-
bering The Game, will only recall
the fourth quarter heroics, the
bulk of the action consisted of aJ
fierce line battle, especially in the JIM MANDICH
second and third quarters. ...TD bound
Michigan could generate virtual- noon, with Michigan's Ron John-
ly no offense as the Spartan de- son drawing first blood on a 38-
tack sndmbotneredtheWush rinatyard run with the game not even
receivers, two minutes old. State retaliated
Just as Dennis Brown and Co. soon afterward but Michigan re-
made the big plays on offense gained its advantage late in the
late in the game, Tom Goss, Phil first quarter.
Seymour, and their cohorts rose All indications pointed to a
up repeatedly in the middle wide-open scoring parade, bu t
stanzas and squelched Spartan suddenly the artillery was silenced
scoring theats. till the fourth quarter. It was as
Although this football gem was if there were two games played,
an anomaly in several ways (for one consisting of the first and
example, the fact that Michigan last quarters, and the other com-
won), it seemed especially strange prising the middle two.
that it should haVe developed into Fortunately, for Michigan par-
a defensive battle at all in the tisans, a win in the first and a tie
second quarter. in the second added up to a wild
The teams started out as if they Saturday celebration. in Ann Ar-
might trade touchdowns all after- bor.
1

1 E " A l.[ / N 9 ' UV 1,Z~ .11'[t [/" G tN7 "tY AIX V" C./ 5i%-'/

I

2
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ORGANIZATIONS and CLUBS
not registered with SGC for the Fall

By FRED LaBOUR : Indiana gallumphed past miser- Dame football eleven trounced
"Now that we've slept off the able Iowa. 38-34 in a full-blown Northwestern 27-7, but not before
joys of hang over, we see the offensive battle as the final score the Wildcats from Evanston threw
Big Ten was not sleeping in will indicate, a little scare into their Catholic
clover." Indiana totalled 527 yards of of- counterparts.
-L. Burpank fensive prowess and dignity but It had appeared that North-
Of course we would all like to they nearly were beaten anyway. western might really be into some-
believe that Michigan's so-called After blowing a 14-0 lead to the thing hot when they held the
glorious conquest of Michigan Hawkeyes, the frantic Hoosiers South Benders to seven points in
State last Saturday was the only had to make up a 28-21 deficit in the first half, but it was not to
game played in the conference. the final half, and make up they be.
This particular contest, to a few did on the passing arm of half- Last, and certainly least, we
anyway, has become the center back John Isenbarger. come to Madison, Wisconsin. *
of the football hub, so to speak. Isenbarger sent his teammates Madison is where the hippies now
To these fanatics, that strange and himself ahead in the fourth flourish and the football team
calliope of fate we call "Pigskin" quarter by hitting flanker Jade stinks, instead of vice versa.
seems to whirl solely around this Butcher m the endzone after h
taking a pitchout from quarter- Te hapless Badgers, (Hapless
tilt. bak a Gonso was invented for Wisconsin) took
But it just ain't true. For an- back Harry Gonso. n
nually, and often every year, the In sunny Minneapolis, home of on a team from the Far West.
nualy, nd fte evry ear th th mavelus uthie heareover the Great Divide, and per-
wizards of the Big Ten plan some the marvelous Guthrie Theatre, usual came out bewildered and
other games to coincide with the Minnesota belted Illinois in the usaldr
mouth, 17-10. beaten.
Michigan-Michigan State game, It was the Gophers clutch de-
in alternate cities of course. fensive play that saved the day and theiteam was Utah State.
Take Columbus, Ohb for in- nsvpayhtsvdthdy
stance. It was in Columbus that for them, as they stood off two An example of the fine, ex-
Ohio State whipped top-ranked Fighting Illini penetrations to posive Wisconsin offensive attack
Ohiord tte whippedto-rdayte their 10 and 20-yard lines .fn the is the fact that a total of six Bad-
by catapulting the Buckeyes into second half. ger runners gained a total of two
the "Team to be Reckoned With" Phil Hagen, Minnesota quarter- yards rushing.
the Tea to e Rckond Wth"back, played an exceptional game Another is that quarterback Bob
spotlight that pops in the at his position, threading the old Schaffner, who was removed in
Weste ofaeeneach son,' needle 17 of 26 times for. 171 the second half, hit for one of two
Purdue' f abled offense couldn'tads passes for minus one yard.
even whimper into the endzone yards. pasBed-fs, minusroCesyard.
for a single tally, the first time it's South Bend-wise, the Notre C'est la vie.
happened to them since 1965.
But it was the impotence of Le- *
roy Keyes the Great that was theWoivernes 17th in AP peilld
cruelest elixir to be forced down
the Boilermakers' c o 11 e ct i v e
throats. Keyes managed to ony
creep 19 yards in seven carries for
a new Big Ten record for let-
down. With its 28-14 shellacking of over Stanford, while Purdue, No. 1
Over in tree-swept Iowa City, Michigan State, Michigan shot last week, fell victim to oncoming
into the national ratings for the Ohio State, 13-0.
first time this year. Rated seven- The Buckeyes' shutout of Leroy
*:teenth, Michigan is tied with Tesuoto eo
Billboard s w aIdKeyes andCo. elevated them from
Southern California leaped into fourth to second place, while
first place with a 27-24 victory Purdue skidded to fifth.
The Women's Badminton Club 1. Southern California 23 4-0 718 12. Miami Fla. 3-1 133
is mjeeting at 5:10 p.m. Tuesday 2. Ohio state 12 3-0 672 13. Nebraska 3-1 122
. Penn State 3 4-0 606 14. Stanford 3-1 70
at Barber Gymnasim. 4. Kansas 4 4-0 540 15. Texas Tech 3-0-1 50
5. Purdue 3-1 452 16. Mississippi 3-1 32
The Women's Speed swim and 6. Notre Dame 3-1 348 17. Texas 2-1-1 28
Diving club is meeting Tuesday 7. Florida. 4-0 340 MICHIGAN 3-1 28
8.'Tennessee 3-0-1 319 9. Indiana 3-1 22
9-10 p.m., at the Women's Pool. 9. Arkansas 4-0 243 20. Missouri 3-1 21
All students are invited. 10. Georgia 3-0-1 240 Louisiana State 3-1 21
'71/

term, please do so

by October 16th

at 111

SAB.

it ='ii

t

Now you can buy Black Label, beer in a keg one man can handle.
A new 12-ounce reward, made for any time you feel you've earned one.
We call it the new, improved victory celebration.

I'our
success
symbol0
Ashland
Could be. The Ashland Oil and Refining
Company, a growth oriented petroleum
company rapidly expanding and diversify-
ing in petrochemicals, plastics, synthetic
rubber and many other industrial and
commercial fields, has unusually interest-
ing career opportunities for: DEGREED
ENGINEERS (ME, EE, IE, CHEMICAL
ENGINEERS), MARKETING PERSON-
NEL, ACCOUNTING MAJORS, DATA
PROCESSING SPECIALISTS and gradu-
ates in many other fields.
Interviews on Campus
Monday,. October 2 1968
For interview appointment
~' 7 7 ~ ..iX-,ppa.

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