100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, ,October 1], 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace N ln'e

riday, Octobe~r 11, 1968THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rPOOiya N"e u

M-JIS I
By JIM WILE
When a big game .against a rival
school approaches, feelings on
both sides are bound to be intense.
With t h e Michigan-Michigan
State game, it's been more like a'
70-years' war.
One might ask what's the story
behind this feud between the good
guys and the Spartans. Who were
the heroes and who were the goats
that had their shot at glory in
this ancient and immortal game?
It all began 70 years ago, on
* October 13, 1898 when people got a
charge from riding in a horse-
drawn Tally-Ho coach f r o m
Holmes Livery. Sprouting on thel
footballscene was the initial en-
counter between the Michigan
Varsity, pride of the Midwest, and
the upstart eleven from Michigan
r Agricultural College.
One must give credit to the
Farmers, (a team that was play-
ing Lansing High School, Olivet,

tradition:

The Seventy-years

and Port Huron Y.M.C.A.) f o r
even coming to Ann Arbor to play
the terror of Notre Dame, Ohio
State, and Minnesota.
The game was far from excit-
ing (39-0); even the players were
bored.
A local newspaper called it:
S.. -a game that did not afford
the Varsity half the practice that
they would have had in a line-up
against the third 'scrub eleven."
Not much of a game but it was the
first.
Moving along ten years to 1908
stud e n t s were entertained
by such great minstrel shows as
George Evans and his 100 Honey
Boys and Michigan fans by the
remnants of Fielding H. Yost's
point-a-Imninute football teams.,
State fans remember '07 as the
year fullback Leon C. Exelby led
M.A.C. Aggies to a smashing 30-6
victory over Saginaw Naval Bri-
gade, and a 6-0-2 season.

In that year, the Varsity was
humiliated for the first. time in
Lansing, as M.A.C. played them to
a 0-0 tie. A bruising game saw
M.A.C. push the Varsity lines all
over Lansing and Leon Exelby fol-
lowed.
A reliable news story said:
"..Lansing is football mad.
Nightdress parades and other noc-
turnal orgies were in progress as
the team left to city. Women
joined the shouting host of men
in the streets and whooped it up
for M.A.C."'
1917 saw General Pershing's
doughboys singing In the first line
trenches on the French front. And
back home, football fans saw the
Wolverines invade East Lansing
successfully in a 27-0 route over
Michigan Agricultural College in aI
bloodless slaughter.
Recent years had provided a
few too many Aggie upsets and the
Wolverines were out for revenge.
Big Tad Wieman stole theshow

along with three touchdowns away
from the stunned Farmers.
Some ol'dtimers may remember
this game as the one in which the
Farmers failed to make one first
down.
In 1928 it was Zepplins, Hoover,
and a new name for the Farmers -
Michigan State College. Already
the Spartans were "pointed for
the traditional encounter with the
Wolverines, their .most important
test each year." A hard fought 3-0
victory was the only bright spot in
the season for a poor Wolverine
eleven. It was a battle between
two powerful defensive teams with
the last- half played during a
steady rain.
The only score came when Wol-
verine Hughes drop-kicked from
21 yards. Surprisingly M.S.C.
fought the rain and Wolverine of-
fense until the bitter end. The
Spartans featured a spectacular
aerial attack, led by "Iron Duke
Schau" at quarterback.
1938 was the year of the leader,
the U.S. had Roosevelt, and Mich-

1948 was the year of the great
baby boom and another tight
game with State. This time Mich-
igan came out on the right side of
a 13-7 score brought about by Pete
Elliott and Warren Huey. The
Wolverines were up for this one-
and beat State and their great
coach Biggie Munn.
It was noted that "this was the
first time in years that sympathetic
Wolverine rooters didn't feel oblig-
ed to cheer for an underdog
M.S.U. team during a touchdown
drive".
1958 finds Duffy Daugherty and
the Michigan State University
Spartans as members of the Big
Ten making their presence felt.
Duffy has built a monster power-

war As usual the Unusual
: around All-Americans Sam
ims and speedy backs Dean (d
and Art Johnson I'I O
gued by injuries the Wolver-
aent up to East Lansing andh
i themselves ahead 12-0 at Quality Merchandise at Reasonable Prices
ime. But Michigan was un -
to hold the Spartans down. 330 Maynard, Across from Arcadea
k returned a Wolverine punt!
Lrds for a touchdown. When-- ------

Looa
9o ya2

the smoke cleared the final score
showed a 12-12 tie.
Now it's 1968, the year of Spiro
T. and Tiny Tim. The Wolverines
hold a 36-19-5 edge over the Spar-
tans, but they haven't socked it to
old Sparty since the Beatles were
holding everybody's hand.
It's time to stop holding hands
and start playing football.

F

'i

SPORTS SHORTS:
Br
Brundage ,re"mamns I

[r t E

lEXICO CITY () - Averyi
Brundage, 81-year-old apostle of
amateurism in sports, won re-elec-
tion yesterday as president of the
International Olympic Committee,
defeating Count Jean Beaumont of
France, the only other candidate'
for the prestigious post.
Brundage, who has held the
high IOC post since 1952, said in
a post-election press conference:
"I didn't come here as a candidate.
I was approached by members of
the Congress who asked, me to
stand by for re-election.
"I agreed to do so because I
think we all must unite in promot-
ing the true Olympic ideals which
are being challenged but which
should remain inscrutible.
"We are living in a changing
world and there are many prob-
lems for us that are new as far as
the Olympic movement is concern-
ed."
Questioned on the fact that he

will be 85 when the next Olympic
Games are held in Munich in
1972 and whether he considered
himself too old to hold the presi-
dency, Brundage retorted:,
. When I arrived in Mexico City
I was 81. Now I feel like I'm 91.
I announced I would never be a
candidate again or have my name
used again for this position."
Exit Hull
CHICAGO (R .- Hockey super-
star Bobby Hull, unhappy with the
salary offers of the Chicago Black
Hawks, quit th;e team. There was
immediate speculation that Hull's
announcement might be a wedge
in his efforts to become hockey's
first $100,000-a-year player and
the Golden Jet refused to com-
ment when asked it his decision
was firm.
In his brief statement, the top

ige adaF1ritz Cridler. Crisder built
I~tz~~tUthe machine around men like Eva-
oanead-,
shevsky, Harmon, and Kromer.
The Spartans were overpowered
gate attraction in the National by Michigan's winning combina-
Hockey League said, "It is with tion of player and coach talent.
a great deal of regret and much It was the opening game and the
sadness that I face the fact that I wes tookeing14-0 adthea
my contributions to my team, and Kolverines took it 14-0 wIth Paul
to hockey, are a matter of' dis- Kromer getting both touchdowns.
pute. whoisConstant gains were made by Tom
H ,ass h se Harmon to keep the Spartan de-
Hull,wh possessed the fastest fense occupied. Oan State's side
shot in hockey-estimated at more hensecie pnt of
than 100 miles an hour, mentioned the. precise punting of Jph
the possibility of retiring several Pingle was displayed.
times in recent years. A quotable source said "For
Hull came to the Black Hawks Michigan, victory was as sweet as
in 1957-58 and more than any nector ... a prolific rival had been
single player lifted them from the suppressed, and for the first time
doldrums o fthe NFL to a position in four years the sun began to
of contention, peep through the clouds"

i

.' SUNDAY, OCT. 20, 7:30 P.M.
Tickets: $5, $4, $3
.~ . On Sale at Ma'rwil s,
N.'Land, W.'Land,
Warren at Coss
Mail Order: Masonic Aud.
500 Temple Ave.,
Detroit 48201
Enclose Self-Addressed
Stomped Envelope
--00

Informal Fireside Chats
wi/h
President Fleming
4:00-5:00
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11 th
North Lounge, Union
ref reshn.enIs served

'".

i
a,:
y
!
L

--- _ ______m_ .__

U ,
ON E
N .

ER

Students For McCarthy Present
TITICUT FOLLIES
The Famous Documentary Filmed in a
Massachusetts Mental Hospital
Shown for the First Time in Michigan
Fri., Oct. 11, 7 and 9 P.M.
GRAND BALLROOM
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
Tickets on Sale at booth on the Diag,
Thursday and Friday, and at the door

I

RADIO TRONICS'
One of the largest selections of 8 track
stereo tapes in Ann Arbor
-We have many of your Motown favorites-
4
See the Electro-Voice EV 1122 amplifier
Electo-Voice quality at a reasonable price
Come in and listen to our wide
t selection of E-V speakers
Located at
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
Hours: 10:00-9:00 Mon.-Thurs. 12:00-6:00 Sun.
Fri.-Sat. until 9:30

p ,

FOOTBALL FANS!
Let your college spirit reign! Check the supply of
all your favorite college marches and fight songs at
"the home of Michigan music."
417 E. Liberty Phone
just past AA.Bank 662-0675
mUSIC SHOPS

i ter. - - 1 a . .. .

FREE MIXI

get turned by
"The Deaf Eruption"
Bursley Cafeteria
Fri., Oct. 11, 1968
9-12 P.M.

it

q

I w. - --- w - w W -

i,

C
g
N
0
h

VISIT OUR TAPE
RENTAL LIBRARIES
TERMS C
AVAiLAOLE _TER9
FREE
AMPLI FIER
TEST CLINIC

'
U
4

Bring in your component type amplifier,
old or new, Kit or Factory wied.'.
Find Out FOR FREE if it
(Test conducted by M

is operating at top performance
clntosh Factory Trained Engineers)
A GRAPH SHOWING
PERFORMANCE

I
ii'
ci
N
a
N
8
w
V
H
A
0
H
8
M
H
A
C

ot~oer
SLSIVAO'

Nvioo

'.*M R
ti t

Yours To Keep
A free graph will be made of your amplifier's
performance. It will show the power your
amplifier produces and the distortion it has
at different auto frequencies. Find out now
if your amplifier has any trouble-you may
head off an expensive repair later. (Sorry,
we're not equipped to measure tuners).
ANN ARBOR STORE ONLY

618 S. Main
fl~S .hm t

769-4700

RA

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan