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October 11, 1968 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-11

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Page Eight

THE M1CH[GAN DAILY

Friday, October 11, 1968

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Fr iclay, October 11, 1968

I ENGINEERS & SCIENTISTS

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.,,,...":'.i; a ...... ............n.. n ....,:" .:s .:.r"{:'"l:...........: :1rrrr'.V:}.i}:}rV:: ....."

Mexico City braces
for Olympic ganes

---..,

Wth ur~Inter/ Vted
ouae OUdare vi
tooanni/t tinritew
with or repesentt
an jin je
to at frview
with our reprsensti
FI OCrtOieR2
. re e .
FR D ,
tR Z

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility, 14otlces should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 35281,
L. S. & A. Bldg., before 2 p.m. of the
day preceding publication and by
2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and Sun-
day. General Notices may be pub-
lished a maximum of two times on
request; Day Calendar items appear
only' once. Student organization
notices are not accepted for publica-
tion. For more information call 764-
9270.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 70": North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m.
Computers Fundamentals Workshop:
Chrysler Center, 8:30 a.m.
Department of Philosophy Lecture:
Thomas Nagal of Princeton University.
"Sxual' Perversion,"AFriay, October
I1. 1968, 4:00 p.m. Auditorium( A, An-
gell _ all.
Cinema Guild: Abram Room's Bed'
and Sofa: Architecture Auditorium,
7:00 and, 9:05 p.m.
Department of Astronomy Lecture &
Visitors' Night: Richard G. Teske, As-

sociate Professor of Astronomy, Univ.
of Michigan, "Observing the Sun From
Space," To Observe: a Star Cluster and
a Double Star: 8:00 p.m. Aud. B, Angell
Hall. Children welcomed, but must be
accompanied by adults.
Professional Theatre Program: APA
Repertory Company in Shakespeare's
Hamlet: Lydia Mendelssohn Theater,
8:00 p.m.
Dance Series: National Ballet (From1
Washington, D.C.) in Swan Lake, Act.
II (Tchaikovsky); Concerto Barocco
(Bach) = Balanchine; A Pas de Deux;
and Raymonda (Glazounoff) #- Frederic
Franklin, Director: Hill Auditorium,1
s:30P.M. '
General Notices

Recreational Hours, Women Students:
Barbour Gymnasium will be open for
women students from 3:00 to , 5:00
p.m. regularly on Fridays starting Oc-1
tober 11.,
Center for Russian and East Euro-
pean Studies and the Department of
History Lecture: Thomas J. Hegarty,
Associate Prof esor of History, Boston
University, "Student Activism in Rus-
sian Universities, 1855-1917," 4:10 p.m.,
Monday, October 14, Auditorium A,

MEXICO CITY (A) - The po-
litical strife that has soiled the
image of a progressive, stable
Mexico' is unusual in that it did
not happen sooner.
The students-inspired violence
that has claimed some 50 lives
since July has been throttled at
least temporarily by official mus-
cle. The world's foremost sports
pageant, the 19th Olympiad, seems
certain to go on, starting Satur-
day, without a hitch.
But when the last Olympic cheer
dies down at the close, Oct. 27,
the curtain may be going up on a
sequel to the worst political storm
to r o c k this prosperous nation
since the abortive revolt led by
Gen. Gonzalo Escobar in 1929.
The political illness has not
scarred the capital's impressively
modern facade or slowed its vi-
brant pulse. Nor does the city wear
that bruised, sullen look so fa-
miliar among Latin - American
cities in turmoil.
Because of its size, 6.3 million
Soviets plan
Czech pullout
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (iP) -

people in a 300-square mile met-
ropolitan area, Mexico City looks
big enough to stage a revolution
and an Olympiad at the same time
without one bothering the other.
This is why the games are not
expected to suffer. The evening
of the bloodiest clash between stu-
dents and troops, Oct. 2, Avery
Brundage, president of the Inter-
national 01 y m p i c Committee
(IOC). attended a jazz festival at
the Palace of Fine Arts, 11/2 miles
from the scene of the 'fight. Other
members of t h e IOC executive
committee dined at a luxury hotel
downtown.
Commenting on the violence,
Wayne Le Bombard, U-S. cyclist
from Milwaukee, Wis., said "It's
so far removed from us it might
as well be going on in Vietnam."
"The Olympic Village is a sort
of Shangri-La," said Barry Weiz-
enberg, water poloist from Los Al-
tos, Calif., "it hasn't touched us
and we feel it won't."
Ironically, the source of Mexi-
co's political stability, the Insti-
tutional Revolutionary party, PRI,
that has ruled Mexico for three
decades with partriachal firmness,
is the font of the current stor'm.
There has been growing disen-
chantnient at nearly all levels, but!
particularly among ,middleclass
youth and students, with the one-t

Angell Hall.
Broadcasting Service: WUOM
(91.7 Mc.) I a.m,to 11 p.m.
Friday 11:00 a.m. The Eleyenth
Friday 11:00 a.m. The Eleventh
(Continued on Page 12)

-Associated Press
Russian girls shaping up

Radio
daily.
Hour
Hour

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RC PROPOSAL:
Debate faculty review

(Continued from page 1).
T teraforsuch -

students to submit their criticisms
to him.

The Soviet Union was reported party system and its long-estab-
yesterday night to have promised lished ills; cronyism, nepotism and
that 90 per cent of the Warsaw corruption.
pact troops in Czechoslovakia Evidence of, growing sentiment
would be withdrawn by Oct. 28, the against the party has emerged at
!50th anniversary of Czechoslovak state. and municipal elections and;
independence. in bloody clashes. These were
Diplomatic sources said Soivet mostly in the interior. It was not
there to negotiate a treaty for until the student conflict brokeI
officials made the promise in Ithat the storm brewing on he,
Moscow to Czechoslovak officials fringes was brought home to Mex-
there to negotiate a treaty for icans in the capital.
temporary stationing of, some of - The student explosion was not
the troops in their country. set off by PRI-spawned discon-I
By some current estimates, that tent but that was the main propel-
would mean that about 50,000 or lant, serving to prolong and in-
fewer troops would remain. tensify its effects. Political rivals
The informants said all the and opportunists, Communists,
troops remaining would be Soviet foreign adventurers and thrill-
except for command detachments seekers turned a strictly student'
from Poland, East Germany, Hun- dispute into a conflagration ofI
gary and Bulgaria. still undetermined dimensions. .
Those five countries sent forces The tumult has now died down
into Czechoslovakia Aug. 20 for and post-mortems are proliferat-
the avowed purpose of preventing ing in t h e colorfully festooned
anti-Communist counterrevolu- capital that chose the word
tion. ep~ace" as its Olympiad motif.

11

2282 SAB

764-7442

gubscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone, 764-05,58

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Rbrtson also objected to a
tion would be unclear and possibly'Rbrsn.loojetdt
divisive. 'formal review committee o'n the
Prosf.JaeCONgrounds that criteria for evalua-
Prof. James C. O'Neill. chair- tion would be unclear,
man of the romance languages, de- "What would you judge faculty
partment in the literary college. on?" he asked, "Personality? In-
said student opinion as to; a fac- terest? Relevance? The definition
ulty member's ability would be of what is good. teaching varies in
"extraordinarily limited." the relation~siip of each student
"Because of the short time stu- to his instructor."'
dents are here at the University Guskin objected to the criticism
it is structurally impossible for that a review commitee would
them to gain any useful amount upset the unity of the college.
of expertise" in judging faculty. .de"Te relationship between stu-
desand faculty could break
* Prof. Carl Cohen of the philo- 'down if a review committee be-
ophy department, an Assembly came solely involved in accepting
representative, said a formal re- or rejecting faculty. The commit-
view committee would be "un- tee should be involved in several
realistic," and added it would intermediate steps, most impor-
"use up any reserve of goodwill" tantly, positive feedback to the
the Residential College.-has with professors themselves."
individual departments. Guskin added however that
"You are not dealing with many objections to implementing
hired hands but prima donnas. a review committee at the present
Review of faculty is a very deli- time are legitimate.
cate issue, q hot potato even in "It is true that many faculty
the hands of administrators. You members now would not put up
are not evaluating journeymen with such a review committee.
electricians." , However, I do not feel this means
Residential Co11e g e Director it is an impossible thing. I think
JamesdRobertson said he. felt a faculty attitudes must be changed.
formal board for complaints would It is a toucl iy issue, and it may
upset the unity of the college.- not be possible to resolve in six
month or a year, but it is impor-
Robertson and Cohen agreed tant to start now."
that students had a useful view Dean William Hays of the lit-
in evahliating faculty but that it erary college said there is "noth-
would be better left unstructured. ing in the structural relationship
"I believe the answer lies not in\ between LSA and the Residential
a committee structure but in open College to prevent RC review of
channel~s of communication be- ftaculty."
tween students, and my office," He said he was not prepared to
Robertson said. Ie ehcouraged comment further:
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