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October 10, 1968 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-10

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Thursday, October 10, 1968

THE MICHIAN DAILY Page Nine

Pow... and not a game too soon

(Continued from page 1)
was not Washburn's day. The Ti-
gers hopped on him for two runs
/in the second when Norm Cash
walked on a 3-1 pitch, Willie
Horton doubled him home and
Bill Freehan broke a 16-at-batl
hitless streak, with a single scor-
ing Horton. Washburn, a winner
with relief help from Joe Hoer-
ner in the third game, was wild
and was not throwing hard.

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ANDY BARBAS

The third inning started inno- I
cently enough with a walk to
Dick McAuliffe on four pitches. Brock, whose .400 all-Series av-
Before it was over 10 runs were erage and .480 in this Series led
in, 15 men had been at bat and all the hitters, went out the first
the Cards' Washburn, Jaster, Ron two times but singled in the sixth,.
Willis and Dick Hughes had been before striking out in the eighth.

'

roughed up for a grand slam ho-
mer, six singles, four walks and
a hit batsman.
Kaline, the hitting star of the
Tigers' fine comeback, delivered
his second Series homer 'with .no-
bodyon in the fifth against Steve
Carlton, fifth of seven Card
pitchers.

i

Associated

AL KALINE, an outfielder who has waited for this World Series longer than most people
like to admit, crosses home plate after his mighty homer in the fifth inning yesterday at
Stadium. The belt was Kaline's third straight hit and'fourth RBI of the Tiger slugfest.

d Press
would
Busch

G e runsfran gr

By BILL CUSVMANO
Today will start with a short
sports quiz designed to separate
the real'fan from the dilletante.,
What major college halfback
has gained over 1,000 yards rush-
ing in both his sophomore and
junior seasons?
Answers of 0. J. Simpson and
Leroy Keyes put a person in the
out group. The correct answer is
Chris Gilbert of the University of
Texas.
The question is not really fair,
though, since Chris Gilbert has to
be the least publicized star in col-
lege football today.
Gilbert -has the misfortune of
playing at a time when great run-
ning backs abound and so has nev-
er received the attention he mer-
Its. He is not the flashy, breaka-
way type of speedster that Keyes
is, but still has enough to pick up
the long gain. Gilbert can be as
tough as anyone in the open field,
as Is witnessed by his Southwest-
ern Conference record 96-yard
dash last year.
Yet nobody even hears of the
more sensational of Gilbert's feats.
This is probably due, in a large
-Br u'ndage in'
power figh
MEXICO CITY OP) - Avery
Brundage, the 81-year-old presi-
dent of the International Olympic
Committee, will be challenged di
rectly, by France's Conte J e a n
Beaumont, in the election today.
Madame Monique Berlioux, the
press relations office for the IOC,
announced Beaumont's challenge
to Brundage at a press conference
Wednesday night.
Brundage has ruled the IOCI
since 1952 with an iron hand, and
most observers believe that the 70-
member IOC Congress will re-elect
him, yet again.
They were the only two nomi-
nees for the post. '
Madam Berlioux said that the
election would take place at 12:30
p.m., EDT, Thursday and the elec-
tion would be decided on a simple
majority.
Before the meeting started,
Beaumont said that he would not
challenge Brundage for the presi-
dency unless many members of the!
IOC Commission demanded that
he did so.

part, to the mediocre records that,
Texas has compiled in recent
years. The Longhorns have been
6-4 for the past two seasons and
that doesn't help a star' get rave
reviews when others are playing
for national champions.
The ironic thing is that Gilbert
originally went to Texas for,
among other reasons, its football
,tradition. Texas had jus t had
'three great seasons in a row, in,
cluding a national championship,
when he enrolled. However, des-
pite the disappointing records of
the past two years Gilbert remains
happy with his decision to attend
Texas. He has a great liking for
his coach, Darrel Royal, and is
proud that he has been able to
prove himself at a traditionally
tough school like Texas.
To say that Gilbert has proved'
himself. is actually a vast under-
statement. All he has done is break
the Southwestern Conference sin-
gle game, season and career rush-
ing marks. He has easily lived up
to the reputation he gained while
earning All-American honors at
Spring Branch, Texas H i g h
School.
The sad part of it all is that
Gilbert probably will not be able
to .ave as great a season statis-
tically this year. Texas has chang-
ed from the It formation to a "full
house" backfield, taking some of
the load off Gilbert's strong legs.
He undoubtedly will not carry the
ball as much as he has previously.
Gilbert himself estimates that he
will only rush from ten to.fifteen
times a game now while he form-
erly carried twenty times or more.
This fact does not really bother
Gilbert, though, as he thinks that
he will become better prepared for
the pros. He is now used much t

niore as a pass receiver andi, be-
coming a more versatile ballplayer,
not to mention a bigger threat.
Texas Tech feared him so much
that they doubleteamed Gilbert on
all pass patterns in a game played
two weeks ago.
Gilbert also doesn't mind the
formation because he feels that it
will help Texas to become a win-
ning team. Gilbert wants to win
and at the moment this Is the
uppermost thing in his mind.
Gilbert could be upset by his
lack of publicity, but he is t o o
much of a team man for this. He
is one of Texas' tri-captains, along'
with Corby Robertson a n d Bill,
Bradley, a much hearlded player
in his own right. Some may think
that there is dissension cansed by
the attention given to Bradley,
but ,ths is not so. /Gilbert com-
mented, "Bradley and I are good
friends and our only concern is
for the team."
Gilbert's attitude stems from the
fact that he simply loves football.
He is happy about o'ny rewards
that he has received f r o m the
game but they are all secondary to
actually playing.
Gilbert wants to stay with, foot-
ball after graduation by Joining
the pros. He would prefer to go
with a winner, but the a c t u a 1
playing is w h a t really matters.
Chris Gilbert simply gets pleasure
out of football. f
It is too bad that he can't get
recognition for his work. but the
Texas Longhorn shouldn't h a v e
long to wait. From his record there
is no doubt that he will become
a well known person w h e n he
reaches the professional ranks.
The nice thing about it is that he
probably won't care, as long as he
is playing football.

McLain never had it so good.
The 31-game winner of regular
season, coasted along with a big
lead, pitching steady ball against,
the deflated Cards.
Smith gave McLain the oppor-
tunity to come back after two
defeats. the first pitcher to get
such a chance since Hippo
Vaughn of the Chicago Cubs in
1918 who lost his first two starts
to theBoston 'Red.Sox but won
the third time out.
McLain had the most lopsided
shutout in his pocket until the
ninth, when singles by Roger
Maris, Orlando Cepeda and Ja-
vier gave the Cards their only
run. He allowed nine hits, all
singles, didn't walk a nian and
struck out seven, including the
last hitter he faced, Dal Max-
vill, still hitless in 20 trips.
After the game, McLain w a s
asked if he had good stuff. "It
isn't that hard to pitch when you
have a 13-run lead," he said. "I
had real good control."
7Billboa rd
There will be a general in-1
formation meeting for the.
freshman basketball team on
Tuesday, October 15 at 4:30
p.m. The meeting will be held
in the basement of the athletic
administration building at 1000
State Street.

The deadlvthlird
McAuliffe walked on four
pitches. Stanley singled to
left, McAuliffe stopping at sec
ond. Kaline lined a single to
center, scoring McAuliffe and
sending Stanley to third. Larry
Jaster, a left-hander, replaced
Washburn. Cash singled to
center on Jaster's first pitch,
scoring Stanley and sending
Kaline to third. Horton walked
on a full count, filling the
bases.
Northrup hit a grand slam
homer into the upper deck in
right field, scoring Kaline,
Cash and Horton ahead of him
to put the Tigers ahead 8-0.
It was the eleventh grand slam
in Series history. Joe Pepitone
of the New York Yankees hit
the last one in 1964 against the
Cardinals.
Ron Willis came in to pitch
for St. Louis. Freehan walked
on four pitches. Wert was hit
by a pitch. McClain sacri-
ficed, and was out Shannon to
Javier who covered first. Me-
Auliffe drew an intentional
walk, filling the bases. Stanley
bounced to Cepeda, who threw
to McCarver. forcing Freehan
at the plate.
Kaline singled to left center
for his second hit in the in-
ning, scoring Wert and McAul-
iffe with Stanley taking third.
Dick Hughes replaced Willis ov
the mound for the Cardinals.
Cash bounced a single over Ce-
peda's head downsthe right
field line, Stanley scoring and
Kaline moving to third. It was
Cash's second hit in the in-
ning. Horton hit a liner that
deflected off Hughes' glove and
beat it out for a single, Kaline
scoring and Cash taking second.
Northrup flied to Brock.
Ten runs, seven hits, no er-
rors, two left.

-Associated Press
GENTLE JIM NORTHROP hops onto home Wate after swat-
ting his grand slam home run yesterday against the St. Louis
Cards. Northrup*is being greeted at the plate by Al Kaline and
Willie Horton, famous Tiger outfielders.

Another squeaker?

McAuliffe 2b
Stanley ss-cf
Kaline rf
Cash lb
Horton If,
Oyler ss
Northrup cf-If
Freehan c
Wert 3b
McLain p
To"
Brock If
Flood of
Maris rf
Cepeda lb
McCarver c
Shannon 3b
Javier 2b
Maxvill ss
Washburn p
Jaster p
Willis p

DETROIT
ab
25
4
4

3
5
4
3

F
i
7

r
2
3
2
2
1
0
1

b .bi .o
0 0 3
3 4 7
3 2 5
2 2 0
2 4
1 1 7
0 0 _2
0 :0 0

a
1
9
0
0
0
0
0
0
o

Hughes p 0
Ricketts 1
Carlton p 0
Tolan 1
Granger p 0
Edwards I
Nelson p 0
Totals 355
Detroit A ' 2 19 9
St. Louis N 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0
b 1, 0. o 4
0 0.0 1I1
0 $ 0 0 0
S0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0
;1 9 1 2713
1 0 '0 #,P-13
0.0 0 0..1-.1

als 34 13 12
ST. LOUIS
ab r 1X
4, 0 1
4 1
4 a 2
4 0 1
4 U 1
4 0 1
40 a0
a 0 0
0 0 0

13 27

bi
0
0
0
0
>o
0
0
1
0

0
1
0
2
7
1
3
4
9
0
a

1 E-Brock, Stanley. DP-Maxvill, Jav-
5 ier and Cepeda; Stanley, McAuliffe and
Cash, Maxvill, Javier and Cepeda;
Granger, Maxvill and Cepeda, LOB-De-
.atroit A 5, St. Louis N 7. 2B-=Horton. HR
0 -Northrup, Kaline. S--McLain.
0 ip h rer
2 McLain-w .9 9 1 1
0 WashburnL 2 4 5k5
2 Jaster r' 09 23 3
2 Willis x 1A4 4
5 Hughes 2 0 0
0 Carlton 3 3 1 1
0 Granger 2 0 0 0
0 . Nelson 1 0 0 0

CHRIS GILBERT

GRADUATING ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS
BUILD YOUR CAREER IN FLORIDA
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ENTERTAIN-
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314 S. Fourth Ave.
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c o

'

ECI'S ST. PETERSBURG DIVISION
-ON CAMPUS INTERVIEW OCT 16

1

This may be the chance you have
been waiting for - an exceptional
professional opportunity with an in-
dustry pace-setter on Florida's sub-
tropical Gulf Coast in St. Petersburg.
For qualified graduates in elec-
tronics, physics, and mechanical and,
chemical engineering , ECI offers
excellent career opportunities in such
areas of advanced development and
design as coding, modulation, digital
communications, microelectronics, RP
communications technology and satel-
lite systems.
ECI is a recognized leader in com-
%mand and control systems, minia-
turized transmitters and receivers,

multiplex systems and space instru-
mentation. With 2200 employees,
ECI is large enough to offer the fa-
cilities, programs and security you
are seeking, but small enough to
stress individual. achievement and to
give you every opportunity to realize
your capabilities to the fullest.
As a member of ECI's professional
team, you will be encouraged to con-
tinue your education with postgrad-
uate study. ECI, offers a full tuition
refund.
Visit the placement office today
and make an appointment to talk
with Electronic Communications, Inc.
on Wednesday, Oct. 16.

4

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low.

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So that we can get to know more about one another, we
have arranged an informal buffet for interested physics and elec-
tronic, mechanical and chemical engineering seniors and
their ladies at the Ambassador Restaurant, Statler Hilton Inn,
beginning at 6:30 P.M. Tuesday evening, Oct. 15, 1968. Please

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